Safety issues, property value concerns prompt township to tear down a Stoner Street home

Homeowners on the township’s west side have one less problem to worry about. The Lansing Township Board of Trustees decided on March 7 that a rental property at 507 Stoner St. had to be demolished. According to the Ingham County Treasurer’s Office, the 956-square-foot home was built in the 1930s and had been in delinquency since the summer of 2015. “Buildings in our township are usually torn down because they pose as a safety hazard,” Lansing Township supervisor Diontrae Hayes said.

Lansing Township “not the smallest but not the biggest”

According to 2015 Census data, Lansing Township has a total of 8,145 people. The township is made up of both urban and suburban islands of about 4.93 square miles of land. Amongst the 1,242 other townships in Michigan, Supervisor Diontrae Hayes of Lansing Township said “it’s not the smallest but not the biggest.” Still, it’s getting bigger in some ways. “Lansing Township is unique with its new construction and new businesses,” Hayes said.

Lansing Township’s youth warily watch for changes in health care coverage

Antonio Baker stands behind the counter of Biggby Coffee located on 1701 S. Waverly Road, and prepares an iced coffee drink for a customer. He has few worries while he’s focused on his job. One of them definitely isn’t health care, at least not today. Biggby Coffee is one company that does not offer part time health benefits to its employees, which isn’t uncommon for part-time employees, according to healthcare.gov, “Employers aren’t required to provide health insurance for part-time employees, even if they provide coverage for full-time employees. ”

Therefore, Baker remains a dependent with his health care being covered under his parent’s insurance.

Working women in Lansing Township drive civilian labor force

Three years ago, Abby Ciesalk was entering her sophomore year at Michigan State University. She was on the job hunt like many students always are and went looking around for applications to fill out. “I’d never worked in retail before but I just needed like a simple part time job to do during school,” Ciesalk said. “So I just applied to places around my area, [Eastwood Towne Center] is like 10 minutes from my apartment, so I kind of applied out of convenience at first.”

She found the perfect job at a Bath & Body Works located within Eastwood Towne Center, a shopping mall in Lansing Township. Flash forward, Ciesalk will be graduating this spring and has continued working in the township for so long because of the people.

Lansing Township first responders, among others in Lansing area, respond to calls outside jurisdiction

Like the other first responders in the greater-Lansing area, Lansing Township Police Officer Matt Birr’s daily routine is different from others in his field of work. The 10-year veteran can spend his 12-hour shift doing a number of things; from patrolling the morning traffic at Waverly East Intermediate School and other surrounding areas in the township, or handling penny thefts and other reports of mischievous behavior to intervening with calls about domestic abuse. “The days tend to go by pretty fast,” Birr said. And due to the fragmentation of Lansing Township, many of the station’s calls from the dispatch center aren’t actually cases where the Lansing Township Police Department has jurisdiction. The east and west sides of the township sandwich the city of Lansing, and the township is just blocks away from Clinton and Eaton counties.

Lansing Township makes recovery from wind storm

The tumultuous windstorm that swept through Michigan on March 8 left Susan Flores feeling as if it was ‘just a normal day.” But her workplace’s neighbors may beg to differ. “The whole strip with Little Caesars, McDonald’s and all the way down to Taco Bell lost power,” said Flores, who works at the Subway located on the corner of Saginaw Highway and Waverly Road. “Our restaurant was okay and it hasn’t impacted us so far … It was just a normal day.”

At the storm’s peak, there were more than 20,000 outages in the area, according to Board of Water & Light.

Despite vacant buildings, some Lansing Township residents say “this is a good area to move to”

For 58-year-old Lansing Township resident Sherry Ellis, abandoned buildings impact the township’s look but not the resident’s attitudes about where they live. The green and white bricked building located on the corner of Clare Street and West Michigan Avenue isn’t a symbol of the Michigan State Spartans. The windows are boarded up, the paint is peeling, overgrown weeds are starting to take over and the bricked walls hold nothing more than the words “Jokr,” sprawled out in purple spray paint. “I do think that the abandoned buildings affect how the township physically looks,” Ellis said. “But I don’t notice business [vacancies] as being a serious situation for someone not to live here.

No signs of re-development for Lansing Township’s Waverly Golf Course

Currently, there are no plans underway showing signs of re-development for the now-empty lot that was once the Waverly Golf Course. Due to a zoning moratorium expiring in Lansing Township, the 120-acre property owned by the City of Lansing closed in 2007. The lot is now a “single-family residential area,” according to Sam Schultz, who is the township planner in Lansing Township. “Currently, it is used as recreation space and it would have to be re-zoned if anything was to be done,” Schultz said. “If zoning was re-done, it could be used for only the options under the township ordinances which involve low resident intensity like churches or public parks and playgrounds.”

Holly Madill who is the outreach specialist for the Michigan State University Land Policy Institute and Planning & Zoning Center provided information on zoning moratoriums from the Michigan State University Extension.

Feeling tired? Your body may be working overtime to rebound from Daylight Saving Time

It’s one of the most loved and hated times of the year — depending on how you feel about Daylight Saving Time. When it comes to springing forward, the good thing is the days become longer, you conserve a small amount of electricity, and in all likelihood, you’re outside more than in the winter. The cons, however, include losing that coveted extra hour of sleep, and multiple health risk factors, like increased stress levels, car crash rates, and an increase in heart attacks and strokes. Whether you’re in Lansing Township, Michigan or Anchorage, Alaska, the effects of daylight saving can be both a blessing and a curse.

Lansing Township working to keep parks in order

John Elias, who lives across the street from Elizabeth Park in Lansing Township, recalls his neighbor, Cheryl Basey, putting her ambitions into action. Basey had a family to worry about. Before passing away, Elias recalls her being the driving force behind creating Elizabeth Park, and arranging for the upkeep of it afterwards. “Most people in this area rent houses and have kids. Cheryl’s house was right next to this empty lot and on top of that she couldn’t see her kids when they were playing outside,” Elias said.