Dup-Dup app takes off

A new social media application startup in Okemos, Michigan is beginning to gain traction and popularity among teens and millennials. Only about 40 days since its official launch, this company has garnered over 250 registered users. Dup-Dup is a simple way to ask and answer questions, help others, be someone’s hero, and share with the entire world who your hero is and how he or she has impacted you.This application enables users to follow their friends, family, and like-minded heroes, while enjoying the interest based curated feed fueled by A.I.  and CEO, Saquib Khan. “Our goal is to create something meaningful, to help each other, and have fun doing it,” said Saquib Khan (Buddy), CEO of Dup-Dup. Khan had the vision of Dup-Dup mid summer 2018.

Taco Tuesday in Williamston?

From Sunny Side Up Café to the Sun Theater and D&W Fresh Market, city officials brainstorm about what other businesses might be missing in downtown Williamston, Michigan.

“If Downtown Williamston is missing something, it is a Mexican restaurant; that would be at the top of my list,” said City Manager Corey Schmidt.

The Farmer’s Market moves indoors for the winter

The Meridian Township Farmer’s market in the summer is located in the Central Park Pavilion at 5151 Marsh Road in Okemos and moves in the winter to the JC-Penney corridor of the Meridian Mall. “We have about 21 vendors on average, everything from produce to hot food is ready to eat come on by” said Corey Patrick, the Farmer’s Market manager. 

Also, market sales Michigan strawberries, peaches, and other fruits and vegetables on Summer. Pumpkins in the fall, and hot foods on Winter. Most of the products sold are mainly grown in the state. Many customers gathered at one market stall, the owner was a woman with her bakery products.

Paddling partners blaze trail through northern Michigan waterways

By CASSIDY HOUGH
Capital News Service

LANSING — Rolling hills, beautiful beaches, great sunsets and a lot of water are just a few things you’ll find in Leelanau County, according to Jon Constant. “People need to see this,” the Leelanau County resident said.  “It’s just so pretty.”

It was his love for the area that inspired Constant to write “Leelanau by Kayak,” a love story to the Michigan county. Leelanau County is the little finger of Michigan, about 30 miles north of Traverse City. The cover of “Leelanau by Kayak” describes the book as containing “day trips, pics, tips and stories of a beautiful Michigan peninsula.”

The first edition was published last spring by Mission Point Press, and can be purchased for $22.

Michigan experts say businesses, farmers harmed in China trade wars

By CRYSTAL CHEN

LANSING — The trade war between the world’s two largest economies has lasted for nearly one year and has already affected U.S industries and consumers, especially buyers and sellers of two items important in Michigan — soybeans and auto parts. Economists have long argued that tariffs come with real income losses. A newly published research article from the Centre for Economic Policy Research, a research network based in London, found that by the end of 2018, import tariffs were costing U.S. consumers and companies that import goods an extra $3 billion per month in added tax costs and an additional $1.4 billion per month in reduction in real income. “Everything affects everything, and everything is related to everything,” said Erkan Kocas, an international trade specialist at the Michigan State University International Business Center. Kocas said that an individual’s income and needs don’t change in spite of tariffs.

Schools buy local produce with state grants

By KALEY FECH
Capital News Service

LANSING — More Michigan students than ever have access to fresh produce, thanks to a state farm-to-school program. The 10 Cents a Meal for School Kids and Farms program this year provided 135,000 children with locally grown fresh fruits and vegetables. “I’m all about kids eating healthy food, and there’s nothing healthier than fresh produce that’s grown right in their home state,” said Diane Golzynski, the director of Health and Nutrition Services in the Department of Education. Grant-winning school districts purchase fresh fruits, vegetables or dried beans grown in Michigan. The schools report how many meals they served that contained the fresh produce.