Coffee shops take major steps to minimize environmental impact

Coffee shops across the state are working to become more environmentally friendly. Measures include growing their own plants to flavor beverages, reusing glass milk bottles, donating leftover grounds to community gardens, buying beans grown without pesticides and revamping their roasting systems. We hear from owners in Coldwater, Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti and from an MSU expert.

Minong Ridge Trail: One tough trek

It may be Michigan’s toughest hike, the 29-mile Minong Ridge Trail in Isle Royale National Park. Rustic and rugged, it lures backpackers seeking a challenge. Portions are a path in the woods, but much of it is a route along a rocky ridge where an occasional rock cairn is the only indication hikers are headed in the right direction. For news and outdoors pages.

Commentary: Free speech, hate speech and campus values

By ERIC FREEDMAN

Capital News Service

LANSING — From our earliest days of independence to the present, it’s been tough to balance constitutional rights and other fundamental American values:

The Alien and Sedition Acts under John Adams, Abraham Lincoln’s suspension of habeas corpus during the Civil War, internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II, the Red Scare of the Joseph McCarthy era and the suppression of civil rights and the rights to speak and publish freely, to worship, to wed, to protest, to privacy. We’re now witnessing one such debate on public and private college campuses, according to a new national study examining student attitudes toward diversity and inclusivity on one side balanced against free speech on the other. “College students are divided over whether it’s more important to promote an inclusive society that welcomes diverse groups or to protect free speech, even if those protections come at the expense of inclusivity,” said the report, “Free Expression on College Campuses.”

Meanwhile in Lansing, some GOP lawmakers are pushing legislation they assert would strengthen students’ First Amendment rights at public universities and community colleges. College Pulse, an online survey and analytics firm, did the study commissioned by the Knight Foundation and based on interviews with 4,407 full-time students in four-year degree programs. They included about 100 students from Central Michigan University, Eastern Michigan University and the University of Michigan. However, there were too few Michigan participants to “break out and draw conclusive insights into what Michigan students think,” according to Jake Gaba, College Pulse’s vice president of marketing.

CNS BUDGET – June 28, 2019 – Summer environmental bonus 3

June 28, 2019 – Summer environmental bonus 3

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841; cepak@msu.edu. For other matters, contact Dave Poulson at (517) 432-5417 or (517) 899-1640 poulson@msu.edu. This is the fourth of occasional summer bonus budgets of environmental stories produced by our partner, Great Lakes Echo. They will move periodically through the summer. 

Here is your file:

 MUSSELS: Invasive zebra and quagga mussels are badly hurting commercial fishing for whitefish in lakes Huron and Michigan. We talk to commercial fishers and DNR and NOAA representatives from Charlevoix, St.

Invasive mussels slam commercial fishery

By KURT WILLIAMS
Capital News Service

LANSING — Denise Purvis’ family began fishing the waters of northern Lake Huron off Manitoulin Island in 1882. Over the years, they came to expect the unpredictability of a livelihood  that depended on their ability to capture wild fish. Purvis came back to the family business in the mid-1990s after college. Her return coincided with the arrival of zebra and quagga mussels into the Great Lakes. The mussels have become synonymous with the problem of invasive species in the Great Lakes.

Growing green: marijuana presents water, air and energy challenges

By QUINN ZIMMERMAN
Capital News Service

LANSING — Michigan regulators are preparing for the environmental impact of the state’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana. High demand and the new legal status will drive the growth of the state’s crop, Marijuana Business Daily reported last November. Environmental concerns related to water and air quality are associated with the expanding production, said Jill Greenberg, a public information officer with the Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy. “The way the ballot (question) was written, there was no consideration for environmental impact. it all had to be picked up afterward,” said Robert Elmouchi, an environmental quality analyst with the agency’s Air Quality Division.

CNS Summer bonus – June 21, 2019

June 21, 2019 – Summer environmental bonus 3

To: CNS Editors

From: David Poulson

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841; cepak@msu.edu. For other matters, contact Dave Poulson at (517) 432-5417 or (517) 899-1640 poulson@msu.edu. This is the third of occasional summer bonus budgets of environmental stories produced by our partner, Great Lakes Echo. They will move periodically through the summer. Here is your file:

TRIBAL WATER QUALITY: The U.P.’s Keweenaw Bay Indian Community has applied to the Environmental Protection Agency for authority to regulate water quality on tribal land.

Air quality casts pall over Michigan national parks, report says

A new study by the National Parks Conservation Association warns that air quality problems are adversely affecting virtually all national parks, even those remote from major cities.

Those include Sleeping Bear Dunes and Pictured Rocks National Lakeshores, Isle Royale National Park, River Raisin National Battlefield Park and Keweenaw National Historic Park.

We hear from park officials and the Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy. By Eric Freedman.

Tribe seeks to set its own water standards

The U.P.’s Keweenaw Bay Indian Community has applied to the Environmental Protection Agency for authority to regulate water quality on tribal land. I

t would be the first Michigan tribe to gain such responsibility, although 60 tribes elsewhere already have it.

A Senate committee has passed a resolution, sponsored by senators from Vulcan and Ludington, opposing the application. We hear from the tribe’s water resources expert and council president and a law professor who belongs to the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians.

CNS Budget – June 14, 2019

June 14, 2019 – Summer environmental bonus 2

To: CNS Editors

From: David Poulson

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841; cepak@msu.edu. For other matters, contact Dave Poulson at (517) 432-5417 or (517) 899-1640 poulson@msu.edu. Editors: Note that this week we placed images directly into the posts instead of as links to separate downloads. Let us know if that causes problems on your end. This is the second of occasional summer bonus budgets of environmental stories produced by our partner, Great Lakes Echo.