Michigan State Theatre Department returns to in-person learning

The Theatre Department at Michigan State has allowed classes to return to in-person learning with COVID-19 safety measures in place. Theatre isn’t the only department to bring students back into classrooms, but with acting, singing and dance classes, it makes sense that it would be one of the first departments to do this. Normally, drama and singing classes would take place in the MSU Auditorium, but the Wharton Center for Performing Arts is allowing students to do their theatrics in its various theaters and spaces this semester. While the Wharton isn’t the typical classroom for the students, they were excited to be able to practice on stages that professional actors normally use. Students with in-person classes are required to participate in the Michigan State “COVID-19 Early Detection Program” and fill out a health screening prior to vising campus.

COVID-19 creates further financial burden: Will relief come?

While Congress and the White House put overturning the election ahead of COVID-19 relief, college students against across the country are waiting and struggling.

What would they do withe the money? Pay rent, pay down bills, be able to pay tuition to stay in school or get career-related exoerience.

Freshmen skip dorm experience for off-camus living

When the pandemic hit, only 2,000 students were allowed to live on campus instead of the regular 1,500. With Michigan State recommending students to stay home, most freshmen have not had the traditional college experience. But some freshmen made the decision to live near campus while still feeling at home. “Usually you meet people in the dorms,” Nayna Chhabria, a freshman at Michigan State, said. Nayna knew she couldn’t live in a dorm, and she knew she may get homesick.

Michigan universities lose $1.2 billion to the pandemic

UNIVERSITY BUDGET WOES: Declining enrollment and new costs related to the pandemic have Michigan universities cutting costs, deferring construction projects and laying off employees. The Michigan Association of State Universities projects that the state’s 15 public universities will take a $1.2 billion hit. By Zholdas Orisbayev. FOR SAULT STE. MARIE AND ALL POINTS

Watch Focal Point: President Trump rallies in Lansing, enrollment down at MSU, and Spartan football prepares for game against U-M

On this edition of Focal Point, President Donald Trump visits Lansing for the first time ever. Our team meets supporters and protestors at the rally. With admissions down at MSU, Jacob Lothamer investigates how the school is handling a $54 million loss in revenue. We preview MSU football’s massive matchup with Michigan and catch up with Jalen Watts-Jackson. Those stories and more on Focal Point.

Watch Focal Point: Spartan Football resumes, graduating seniors struggle to find jobs during pandemic, and East Lansing prepares for socially distanced Halloween

On this edition of Focal Point, a look at the recently announced changes to the Spring Semester and how MSU plans to keep students healthy while slowly reopening. Due to the pandemic, one East Lansing business is forced to close its doors, and graduating students struggle to find jobs. Big Ten football is back, but two MSU linebackers will not take the field after being arrested in September. Other varsity sports will not return at all after the Athletic Director announced swimming and diving have been cut. Those stories and more on Focal Point.