Local Reaction to Obama’s Immigration Action

For Oscar Castaneda, an immigrant from Guatemala, President Obama’s announcement could not have come fast enough. “I’ve been waiting for 10 years for someone to do something about immigration and nobody does,” Castaneda

But now, that has changed. “First, we’ll build on our progress at the border with additional resources for law enforcement personnel…Second, I’ll make it easier and faster for high-skilled immigrants, graduates and entrepeneurs to stay and contribute to our economy…Third, we’ll take steps to deal responsibly with the millions of undocumented immigrants who already live in our country,” Obama said in a statement to the United States. But there are not enough details for Castaneda to know whether it will truly effect him. Despite this, he is happy to see something done.

Obama Signs Farm Bill at MSU

President Barack Obama made a historical event at Michigan State University on February 7, 2014. He signed the farm bill, which ensures farmers with crop insurance, and allows people to buy fresh locally grown produce at an affordable price. Debbie Stabenow, who is the senator for Michigan, was the one who pushed this bill. It took her three years to get it though congress. Obama greeted the audience with a powerful “Go Green” so show is Spartan spirit.

Focal Point Spring 2014 [Show 1]

President Barack Obama traveled to Michigan State University to sign the Agriculture Act of 2014. A shooting just of of MSU’s campus has some worried for their safety. And, many people are getting last minute flu shots due to the recent outbreak going around Mid-Michigan. Focal Point is an Emmy awarding winning, student produced newscast from the School of Journalism at Michigan State University.

How to Stay out of Default Paying Back Student Loans

The massive expenses behind higher education in America have been a hot button issue for many years. Every year, thousands of students graduate with thousands of dollars of student loan debt to their name. It may seem like an unbearable vicious cycle to most, but Michigan State University’s Office of Financial Aid stresses that there are options available that will keep students from going into default. Reaching default haunts credit scores for years, affecting what purchases a person can make. Graduates today are using plans that tie loan payments to income. These income-based programs are built to make loan repayment manageable and make life easier for those who struggle to find a job, although the Financial Aid staff does warn about interest collecting when you miss payments.

Gun Control Back on National, Local Stage

The future of gun control in America is currently a blurry picture. Proponents of new legislation are pushing for a reinstatement of the assault weapons ban, as well as a ban on high capacity ammunition magazines. There is also a push for universal background checks. Meanwhile, gun rights advocates are pushing back and insisting that no new gun legislation will stop criminals from committing crimes. The only thing both sides can seem to agree on is the need for further mental health studies for a potential gun purchaser.

Students in Final Push to Get Out the Vote

In the final days leading up to the election, students on campus with both the Romney and Obama campaigns are working hard in their final get-out-the-vote efforts. Will Staal has been volunteering with the Romney campaign since August. The MSU junior said he got involved because the implications of the this election couldn’t be greater. “For people, especially my age, we’ve had enough time of sitting on the sidelines and letting people in Washington make our decisions” Staal said. “I just wanted to stand up and fight for a cause I believe in.”

College students look forward to voting in first election

By David Topham
Ingham County Chronicle staff writer

EAST LANSING — Most students at Michigan State University will be old enough to vote in a presidential election for the first time this year. On Tuesday Nov. 6, the public will determine who will be the next president. As Election Day draws near many students are gathering information to make an informed decision. The votes that these first-time voters will cast will help elect either Barack Obama, the nation’s current president, or Mitt Romney, the Republican Party’s nominee.

First presidential debate brings the clash to small towns

By Eric Finkler
Grand Ledge Gazette staff writer

GRAND LEDGE, MI – The trickle-down effect may or may not create jobs, but the strife between Republican and Democratic Parties certainly trickles down into small communities following the debate. On Thursday, Oct. 4, after the debate, advertisements were made by both parties highlighting the negatives of their opponents and the positives of their candidates which reflected the feelings in the residents of Grand Ledge. “I was disappointed in the debate,” said Grand Ledge resident, Christine Walker. “I’ve been watching the debates since ’64 and this was probably the most tedious one I’ve seen.”

“Romney was well prepared; it felt like he had memorized and repeated stats the entire time.