Dusty’s Cellar continues to serve Okemos after 31 years

 

Small and locally owned businesses are rare and often hard to find, but in the heart of Okemos stands Dusty’s Cellar: a wine bar, tap room, bakery, and cellar all in one. For over 37 years Dusty Cellar has been providing delicious baked goods, fine wine, and fresh hand carved meat for the Meridian and Okemos area. “In 1980 my dad, Dusty, founded this establishment which started off as a bakery in Meridian Mall and then in 1981 we moved from the all into this current location and we’ve been here since”. said Matt Rhodes, the current owner. The establishment started off with a bakery, specialty food, gourmet wine and cookware, which eventually got phased out and got turned into the first restaurant and 12 years later a second restaurant was added to the same location.

Feast or famine for food banks at Thanksgiving

By KAREN HOPPER USHER Capital News Service LANSING — In Comstock Park near Grand Rapids, the hunger organization Feeding America West Michigan is doing something it’s never done before for Thanksgiving. The group is opening its warehouses directly to the … Continue reading →

Clinton County farms still vital to economy

By Rachel Bidock
Clinton County Staff Reporter

The relationship between farmers and non-farmers in Clinton County has changed, but the importance of farmers in the county has not. Farms are a vital source of income for towns in Michigan, said Paul Thompson the Kellogg Chair in agricultural, food and community ethics at Michigan State University. “Farming really is the single, economically most important industry in most of these rural communities, particularly here in the southern half of the state,” Thompson said. According to Scott Swinton, a professor at MSU’s Department of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics, because farmers earn money for their crops and then spend that money, they help out the communities. “When one person in a region earns money, as farmers do from selling their crops and livestock, they spend that money other places in the community, it’s what economists call a multiplier effect,” Swinton said.

Holt offers low-income families a crack at farmer's market products

By Roya Burton
Holt Journal Staff Reporter

Fresh is the word many of us like to hear when it comes to our nutrition. Questions of our food being organic or processed can be a frequent concern. However, no matter how you like your food, many of us can rely on our local farmers markets to supply locally-owned and grown produce year round. In Holt, that includes low-income customers. The Holt Farmers Market, which is owned and operated by the Delhi Downtown Development Authority (DDA), has been supplying local residents of every income the last couple of years.

Farmer’s markets taking off in DeWitt, nationwide

By Laina Stebbins
Bath-DeWitt Connection Reporter

DEWITT — The Downtown DeWitt Farmers Market is a one-stop shop for fresh produce, locally-sourced meat and eggs, an assortment of home goods, and a hefty dose of community engagement. The farmers market, which is run by the DeWitt Downtown Development Authority, brought in an average of 1,000 attendees in 2015. “Last year, we had a pretty tremendous showing with both vendors and attendance,” said Linda Kahler, Market Manager and DDA Coordinator. As for this year, Kahler said attendees “can expect higher foot traffic and more of a variety of vendors … which will allow our shoppers to have a more diverse shopping experience.”

The growing attendance rates of Downtown DeWitt’s Farmers Market are not unique to DeWitt, as farmers markets nationwide are experiencing a rise in popularity among consumers. Official surveys from the U.S. Department of Agriculture confirm this trend.

Holt Farmers' Market seeing record sales this year

By Carrie Lynch
Holt Journal staff reporter

The Holt Farmers’ Market has extended its hours and is now open every Saturday all year round due to increasing sales from vendors. Marcy Bishop Kates, executive director and cofounder of Holt Community Connect — a nonprofit organization to help the community thrive — said that market sales have broke a record of over $5,000 this past year. The market is located at 2150 Cedar Street, which is the former fire department building. Market Manager Chuck Grinnell says the increase in sales is due to the growing amount of customers as well as vendors. “Our customer base has grown such that it can support a year round market, we have vendors that rely on year round sales income, and making the best use of an indoor facility, ” says Grinnell.