Williamston Pub & Grill expands promotions, community involvement and unique menu

From the Williamston Hornet décor, to the prime location right in downtown Williamston, the Williamston Pub & Grill continues to be a popular restaurant to Williamston residents and beyond. Through continuous community involvement, new promotions and a unique menu, the Williamston Pub & Grill has found new ways to attract customers and strengthen its relationships with pre-existing consumers. Prior to the opening of the Williamston Pub & Grill two-years ago, the restaurant was known as the Bucket. “The old owner was in between chefs and staff when we got here,” Executive Chef and Co-Owner Luciano Loredo said. “We tweaked the menu a bit at first and then I got out here and we started working on it to create what we have now.”

According to Loredo, a driving component to their success lies in their continual community involvement.

Groovy Donuts promotes fresh products and customer relations

From retro décor, to old-school records lining the walls, the Groovy Donut shop enters its third year in business while continuing to strengthen customer relations and their reputation for their distinct brand of freshly baked donuts. Groovy Donuts manager Rachel Craner said since being established in 2015, Groovy Donuts has found success through strengthening their relationship with regular customers. “Most of the employees here are from Williamston, which helps with knowing familiar faces that come in,” Craner said. “Our success relies heavily on our regulars. Some come in every week for a dozen donuts, and others come in every morning for a donut and a coffee, but either way we find ways to strengthen those relationships.”

According to Craner, Groovy Donuts finds success through promotions and their ability to produce fresh and unique products.

PHOTOS: Eating on less than $20 per week

The relationship between college students and food assistance has been very scarce since the U.S. Department of Agriculture Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) policy requirements changed and was then adapted by Michigan Department of Health and Human Services in 2011. This has affected various college students when it comes to paying for constant groceries, especially student Cahlan Gillard-Tucker, a junior at Grand Valley State University in Michigan. He opened up and showed a day in the grocery store for him — from budgeting, coupon cutting, and hoping to find sale sides in every aisle. Groceries can get quite expensive for Tucker when you only have less than $20 in assistance to work with.

Dusty’s Cellar continues to serve Okemos after 31 years

 

Small and locally owned businesses are rare and often hard to find, but in the heart of Okemos stands Dusty’s Cellar: a wine bar, tap room, bakery, and cellar all in one. For over 37 years Dusty Cellar has been providing delicious baked goods, fine wine, and fresh hand carved meat for the Meridian and Okemos area. “In 1980 my dad, Dusty, founded this establishment which started off as a bakery in Meridian Mall and then in 1981 we moved from the all into this current location and we’ve been here since”. said Matt Rhodes, the current owner. The establishment started off with a bakery, specialty food, gourmet wine and cookware, which eventually got phased out and got turned into the first restaurant and 12 years later a second restaurant was added to the same location.

Feast or famine for food banks at Thanksgiving

By KAREN HOPPER USHER Capital News Service LANSING — In Comstock Park near Grand Rapids, the hunger organization Feeding America West Michigan is doing something it’s never done before for Thanksgiving. The group is opening its warehouses directly to the … Continue reading →

Clinton County farms still vital to economy

By Rachel Bidock
Clinton County Staff Reporter

The relationship between farmers and non-farmers in Clinton County has changed, but the importance of farmers in the county has not. Farms are a vital source of income for towns in Michigan, said Paul Thompson the Kellogg Chair in agricultural, food and community ethics at Michigan State University. “Farming really is the single, economically most important industry in most of these rural communities, particularly here in the southern half of the state,” Thompson said. According to Scott Swinton, a professor at MSU’s Department of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics, because farmers earn money for their crops and then spend that money, they help out the communities. “When one person in a region earns money, as farmers do from selling their crops and livestock, they spend that money other places in the community, it’s what economists call a multiplier effect,” Swinton said.