Dusty’s Cellar continues to serve Okemos after 31 years

 

Small and locally owned businesses are rare and often hard to find, but in the heart of Okemos stands Dusty’s Cellar: a wine bar, tap room, bakery, and cellar all in one. For over 37 years Dusty Cellar has been providing delicious baked goods, fine wine, and fresh hand carved meat for the Meridian and Okemos area. “In 1980 my dad, Dusty, founded this establishment which started off as a bakery in Meridian Mall and then in 1981 we moved from the all into this current location and we’ve been here since”. said Matt Rhodes, the current owner. The establishment started off with a bakery, specialty food, gourmet wine and cookware, which eventually got phased out and got turned into the first restaurant and 12 years later a second restaurant was added to the same location.

Feast or famine for food banks at Thanksgiving

By KAREN HOPPER USHER
Capital News Service
LANSING — In Comstock Park near Grand Rapids, the hunger organization Feeding America West Michigan is doing something it’s never done before for Thanksgiving. The group is opening its warehouses directly to the public instead of only to hunger organizations like soup kitchens. The reason is that the group is having its fourth record year in a row of food donations, said Andrew Steiner, the media coordinator for the organization. That means its warehouse is full. The full house is partially due to a strong harvest, he said, and partially due to the organization’s relationships with food producers.

Northern Michigan pioneers effort to reduce food waste

By BRIDGET BUSH
Capital News Service
LANSING – Emmet County’s recycling program has been recognized as one of four model programs in the state for having a high quality service that matches the needs of the community. The Michigan Profile of Recycling Programs and Potential Recycling studied recycling programs across the state, concluding that the level of participation among residents and businesses is a strong social cue to encourage others to recycle. The study was done by the Northeast Michigan Council of Governments with a grant from the Department of Environmental Quality. Under a recent law signed by Gov. Rick Snyder, beginning October 1, establishments that recycle 100 tons or more per year must collect data and report their activities to the state. The law requires the Department of Environmental Quality to operate a statewide database of recycling efforts, exclusive of food waste, by the facilities, which will be published annually online.

Rescued food feeds the poor

By KAREN HOPPER USHER
Capital News Service
LANSING — Trucks carrying some 40,000 tons of cherries will drop them off this month in Cadillac to fill food bank shelves in West Michigan and the Upper Peninsula. It’s part of a statewide effort to reduce food waste and put it to use feeding poor people. “The state is one of the winners when hunger comes off the table,” said Phil Knight, executive director of the Food Bank Council of Michigan. Flawed and ideal vegetables are held back from the grocer’s shelves and your dinner plate. Industry marketing agreements among growers mean some ideal or “type one” fruits and vegetables are not sold during years where the harvest is strong.

Clinton County farms still vital to economy

By Rachel Bidock
Clinton County Staff Reporter

The relationship between farmers and non-farmers in Clinton County has changed, but the importance of farmers in the county has not. Farms are a vital source of income for towns in Michigan, said Paul Thompson the Kellogg Chair in agricultural, food and community ethics at Michigan State University. “Farming really is the single, economically most important industry in most of these rural communities, particularly here in the southern half of the state,” Thompson said. According to Scott Swinton, a professor at MSU’s Department of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics, because farmers earn money for their crops and then spend that money, they help out the communities. “When one person in a region earns money, as farmers do from selling their crops and livestock, they spend that money other places in the community, it’s what economists call a multiplier effect,” Swinton said.

Holt offers low-income families a crack at farmer's market products

By Roya Burton
Holt Journal Staff Reporter

Fresh is the word many of us like to hear when it comes to our nutrition. Questions of our food being organic or processed can be a frequent concern. However, no matter how you like your food, many of us can rely on our local farmers markets to supply locally-owned and grown produce year round. In Holt, that includes low-income customers. The Holt Farmers Market, which is owned and operated by the Delhi Downtown Development Authority (DDA), has been supplying local residents of every income the last couple of years.