“Now Hiring” signs more common than not in Northwest Michigan

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. — Looking around Traverse City it’s hard not to notice the large quantity of stores looking for more employees in this northwest Michigan beach town. Diane Kimmel, who taught general business at Northwestern Michigan College, says “summer is Traverse City’s tourism time, so early summer and spring are big times for hiring. Traverse City Area Public Schools is one of the biggest employers and so is Munson (hospital). If you think about those two places, the public schools have to hire during the summer and the hospital is pretty much ongoing.”

Kimmel says the most successful way for Traverse City businesses to reach a larger audience of potential employees is by either newspaper ads or employment websites: “If you’re a local person you probably know about the email that comes out every week or every day called The Ticker.

Traverse City businesses prepared for the National Cherry Festival

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. — The annual National Cherry Festival is July 1-8 this year and Traverse City was busy preparing in recent weeks for the thousands of attendees, including both tourists and citizens. Steve Heap, a professional at the Association of Festival Organizers, says that communication is key when a city prepares for a festival. He also says it gets easier with experience, but still takes the whole year to prepare for the annual festival. Kaylie Camp, 19, has worked two previous Cherry Festivals at Fustini’s, an oil and vinegar store located in downtown Traverse City.

Waters rise, gas prices drop and boats boom in summer 2016

By BRIDGET BUSH
Capital News Service
LANSING — Michigan boating boomed this summer as water levels reached near-record highs, gas prices stayed low and the weather invited people to cruise, said boating experts across the state. New models helped increase boat shop traffic, said Nick Polan, executive director of the Michigan Boating Industries Association. Low interest rates made financing more feasible than in years following the 2008 recession. That spurred sales in an industry known for owners who hold onto their boats for decades, Polan said. It was “the seventh consecutive year of expansion for the state’s marine economy.”

Businesses go into summer mode as temperatures rise

By Danielle Duggan
Clinton County Chatter

ST. JOHNS — The end of spring brings preparation for summer sales among various businesses in Clinton County. With the release of students from school and the coming of warmer temperatures, businesses plan early in hope of increasing funds and customers for summer services. Some businesses begin the process of exchanging winter merchandise for summer merchandise in the spring. Shaggie’s, an ice cream store located at 110 N. Clinton Ave., St.

Libraries modernize to bring literature to a technology-dependent generation

By Danielle Duggan
Clinton County Chatter

ST. JOHNS — Even with the growth of technology and virtual books, Briggs Public Library uses summer programs and online resources to keep customers coming through the doors. According to Sara Morrison, library director at Briggs Public Library, located at 108 E. Railroad St. in St. Johns, the summer programs the library hosts not only brings in many participants, but also assure that the children don’t forget information over the summer.

Area farmers still optimistic about summer crops

By Ethan Merrill
Holt Journal staff writer

After one of the most persistent winters that anybody can recall, farmers in the Holt area are not curtailing expectations for their summer crops just yet. The middle of April typically marks the time of year for farmers to begin planting corn in Michigan. However, the unusually cold weather of the past few months is delaying those plans. “Some crops are definitely going to be harvested later than the past few years,” said Farm Bureau agent Dennis Greenman. “Corn and soybean harvests are going to be late if the ground doesn’t warm up soon.

Snow, now field runoff, could close beaches

By ALEXANDRA HARAKAS
Capital News Service
LANSING — Even after all the snow Michigan received this winter is gone and melted, it could still find a way to adversely impact summer vacations. A new study by the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the University of Michigan suggests that extreme precipitation is linked to the need for beach closures. Intense precipitation may cause runoff from farm fields and increase bacteria such as E. coli in the water, leading officials to close beaches. The study focuses on 12 Great Lakes cities from May through September in 2000-06: Detroit and Grand Rapids; Buffalo and Rochester in New York; Chicago and Rockford in Illinois; Cleveland and Toledo in Ohio; Erie, Penn.; Gary, Ind.; Milwaukee, Wis.; and Minneapolis. During the period studied, beaches in eight of those cities were closed for 100 days.

Climate change’s impact on wine grapes under study

By DANIELLE WOODWARD
Capital News Service
LANSING –If you sip your favorite wine and it tastes a bit funny, climate change may be the culprit. More extreme weather, like unpredictable springs and long summer droughts, is to blame for changes in grape production, said Erwin Elsner a small fruit educator at Michigan State University. Scientists say extreme weather is one of the consequences of climate change caused by the burning of fossil fuels. What that means to wine production is as yet unclear, and it’s still too early to tell for certain, Elsner said. “If we could tell our growers that they could expect consistent warming trends, it would be beneficial, but at this point all we have is a more unpredictable climate.