CNS Summer 2024 1st Michigan Environmental budget

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Eryn Ho at (616) 485-9295; hoeryn@msu.edu. 

For other matters, contact Eric Freedman at (517) 256-3873; freedma5@msu.edu

You are welcome to use the CNS logo: 

Editors: This is our 1st CNS summer Michigan environmental package in partnership with Great Lakes Echo. Here’s your file:

BUTTERFLIES: Three butterflies are racing to become Michigan’s official state insect – and the black swallowtail is ahead, at least politically. The Michigan Garden Clubs and a House committee are among its fans, but the Karner blue and the monarch aren’t out of the running yet. Lawmakers, including ones from Meridian Township, Muskegon and Pontiac, are split. By Vladislava Sukhanovskaya.

Jim and Melinda O’Neill’s property overlooks the east end of Belleville Lake. They don’t boat or fish on the lake, but enjoy the view.

Dams may power a stop harmful algal blooms in urban lakes, expert says

DAMS & BLOOMS: Like clockwork, Ford Lake and its downstream neighbor, Belleville Lake, turn bright green every summer due to harmful algal blooms. The lakes, near Ypsilanti, have struggled for decades with phosphorus pollution that spurs algae growth. The quest for a solution is familiar to urban lake communities across the Great Lakes region. Area residents, a U-M researcher and an Ann Arbor public works official discuss. By Elinor Epperson and Daniel Schoenherr. FOR ALL POINTS.

Author Sally Cole-Misch says her background in environmental communication taught her that story-telling is a powerful educational tool.

Need a summer read? Join this Great Lakes -wide book club

GREAT LAKES BOOK CLUB: Readers across the Great Lakes states and Canada this year will participate in a basin-wide book club hosted by the Library of the Great Lakes. From now until September 2025, participants will read Bloomfield Township author Sally Cole-Misch’s The Best Part of Us that takes place on an inland lake near Lake Huron and deals with family history, heritage and place-based attachment.They’ll also read an Ontario author’s children’s book, The Water Walker. By Kayla Nelsen. FOR ALL POINTS.

Farmland in Livingston County.

Utility-scale solar farm proposals cause turmoil in Livingston County

SOLAR DISPUTE: Large-scale solar projects are a hotly disputed topic in Livingston County and elsewhere in the state, especially in rural areas with lots of farmland that could become project sites. Complex, interconnected questions about local government authority, private property rights and renewable energy sources. We talk to a Conway Township farmer, Consumers Energy, Great Lakes Renewable Energy Association and Michigan Environmental Council. By Ruth Thornton. FOR ALL POINTS.

CNS budget, April 19, 2024

CNS BUDGET April 19, 2024 – Week 12

To: CNS Editors & Elaine Kulhanek

From: Eric Freedman

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Eryn Ho at (616) 485-9295; hoeryn@msu.edu. 

For other matters, contact Eric Freedman at (517) 256-3873; freedma5@msu.edu

You are welcome to use the CNS logo: 

Editors:

BONUS WEEK AHEAD: This is our last regular file of the semester. Next Friday we will move our traditional end-of-semester Bonus Week package of still-timely stories you may not have had space for earlier in the semester. You can also continue using archived stories and visuals. Here’s your file:

LAW ENFORCEMENT MENTAL HEALTH: Law enforcement personnel and other first responders face mental health problems from the demands of their jobs, and there are growing resources to help them. We hear from the Michigan Sheriffs’ Association, Police Officers Association of Michigan and Frontline Strong Together based at Wayne State.

Norm Hess is executive director of the Michigan Association for Public Health.

Limited access to health care contributes to higher rural death rates

RURAL MORTALITY: The gap in death rates between urban and less healthy rural areas has widened, USDA figures show. Rural hospitals are reducing services and communities are having trouble recruiting and retaining health care providers. We hear from the Western Upper Peninsula Health Department and the Michigan Association for Local Public Health. By Anish Topowala. FOR MICHIGAN FARM NEWS, SAULT STE. MARIE, IRON MOUNTAIN, MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, CHEBOYGAN AND ALL POINTS.

State pushes to expand free pre-K programs

FREE PRE-K: The governor is pushing to expand free pre-K programs for 4-year-olds. We hear from the Department of Lifelong Education, Advancement and Potential, the Wayne Regional Education Service Agency and a Wyoming legislator who is enthusiastic about its potential benefits. By Sophia Ceru. FOR GREENVILLE, WKTV, DETROIT AND ALL POINTS.

The ExpandXR exposure therapy program

Mental health resources expand for first responders

LAW ENFORCEMENT MENTAL HEALTH: Law enforcement personnel and other first responders face mental health problems from the demands of their jobs, and there are growing resources to help them. We hear from the Michigan Sheriffs’ Association, Police Officers Association of Michigan and Frontline Strong Together based at Wayne State. By Anish Topawala. FOR DETROIT AND ALL POINTS.

New tax-form check box boosts Michigan organ donor registry

ORGAN DONORS: More than 6,000 Michigan residents so far have taken advantage of a 2023 law that lets them check a box on their income tax returns to be designated as an organ donor. A pending bill would mandate organ donor education for 9th graders. Ohio and Illinois have higher rates of organ donors among new drivers. We talk to Gift of Life and to lawmakers from Pittsfield Township and Berkley. Other sponsors include legislators from Grand Rapids, Detroit and Eastpointe. By Owen McCarthy. FOR DETROIT, LANSING CITY PULSE, GREENVILLE AND ALL POINTS