Watch: Lou Anna K. Simon’s resignation and more

Here are today’s headlines from the Spartan Newsroom:

Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon resigns after the sentencing of Larry Nassar
Professor Sue Carter resigns as chair of MSU’s Athletic Council
Oscars nominations
Dan Gilbert’s response to Amazon’s rejection of Detroit for its second headquarters.

What Will the Senate Tax Bill Do to Graduate Students?

In a series of shocking twists and turns, Senate Republicans were able to pass their tax bill, their first legislative victory of the year. The Senate Tax bill calls for a mass overhaul of the American tax code. Everything from tax brackets, health care to graduate student loan rates were touched upon.

Old Town gives to local schools

Old Town restaurants and shops are raising money for local schools in a project called Shop 4 Schools. On Nov. 18, participating retailers in the neighborhood gave 18 percent of customers check-out total to participating schools in the area. Lynn Ross, owner of Mother & Earth Baby Boutique, organized this event based on a similar fundraiser the city of Grand Haven does, where they raised almost $10,000 last year. “A lot of local, small local businesses, don’t have the means to be able to donate items to silent auctions or monetary donations,” Ross said.

Lansing group holds trainings in support of immigrants

On Nov. 11, the Lansing Immigrant Defense group hosted a Rapid Response Training at the Foster Community Center to discuss actions to support immigrants and their families in the event of a deportation. The training discussed direct action tactics, risk and safety assessment and an overview of how rapid response fits into the larger picture of immigrant support in Lansing. In Lansing, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has made no deportations. However, group members said they believe that ICE will begin to amp up their actions in the Lansing community over the next few months.

How Old Town stays afloat

You will always find some type of event happening in Old Town. Why? The neighborhood doesn’t receive any money from the state so these events help raise funds to pay for everything from trash removal to hanging baskets. “We don’t actually get any funding from the state,” Old Town Commercial Association board president Jamie Schriner said. “The largest way that we raise funding is through putting on events.”

Schriner said these festivals include the Old Town Oktoberfest, ScrapFest, and the Chocolate Walk.

Fewer refugees are finding a new home in mid-Michigan

Since the beginning of 2017, there is a substantial decrease in the number of incoming refugees in Lansing. According to St. Vincent Catholic Charities, which is the designated refugee resettlement agency in Lansing and mid-Michigan, there were 248 refugees that arrived in Lansing during the last three months of 2016, but and there are only 83 refugees arrived STVCC in the first quarter of 2017. “We had around 776 refugees last year,” said Judi Harris, the refugee resettlement director at STVCC. “We expected the same number this year until the administration made all these changes, so now we will be lucky to get 450 this year.”

This change is not only happening in Lansing but all over the United States and it appears to follow the new presidency.