Drunkest City

The Lansing area is known for many things. It’s home to the largest university in Michigan and well as the State Capitol. 

However it recently became known for something else

Students develop parking app

For Michigan State students, parking on-campus can be difficult, but the struggle doesn’t end for those living off-campus either.

“We have six girls that live here and our driveway only fits five cars, which is kind of a bummer because we always have to find a place to put one of our cars at night,” said Elena Ferman, a senior at MSU. 

New moped rules hit MSU’s campus

With a 5,200-acre campus, many Michigan State students look to mopeds for a convenient way to get to and from class. 

“The reason I did get a moped was because my classes were in like Comm Arts or Akers, pretty much every single one,” said Josie Foguth, a senior at MSU. 

However moped users are facing some changes this school year. 

The cost of breaking the law

Everyone knows, if you break the law, you’d better be ready to pay the consequences. Traffic violations such as speeding are all fun and games until the blue and red lights come on, and the green starts to come out of your pocket.But does the consequence of a fine deter people from driving recklessly?

Can you eat on $1,000 per year? Yes, says efficiency expert

Finding ways to save money can be difficult. Everyday people have to make decisions about where and how to spend their hard-earned dough. Back in 2014, Michael Kirk decided not only to help people save money, but time as well. After using engineering concepts, he was able to eat for $1,000 a year and decided to share with people what he had learned. He developed a company called Efficiency is Everything (EIE). Through this, he utilizes his master’s degree in engineering to give people tools and data that will allow them to become more efficient in their spending.

Price vs. quality: what influences where we shop for groceries

Money can have a big impact on not only what we eat but also what stores we choose to buy our food from. Some people place a priority on the quality of food while others on pricing of food. Quality seems to be most important when it comes to wife and mother of two, Crystal Oweis. When it comes to quality and organics, Oweis is willing to go out of her way and spend a little more for her family. “Whole Foods has a lot of organic things there and I’ll go to Kroger for cheaper, everyday items,” said Oweis.

Life in the big city comes at a cost

As exciting as living in a big city can be for a young person, when it comes to a budget, costs seem to multiply. Amanda Ogren, an intern at Bosch in Chicago, says that while living in a big city for the summer, she has had to make some financial precautions in order to stay on budget. “Before moving to the city I made a budget sheet with my allowances for food, living, transportation, health and entertainment,” says Ogren. Of her expenses, Ogren notes that her rent is one that is much higher in the city compared to her rent back in the suburbs of Michigan. In Chicago she pays around $1,000 a month and in the suburbs she pays around $700 a month.