Students react to MSU canceling in-person classes for fall

Students respond to MSU canceling in-person classes less than two weeks before classes start and undergraduates move on-campus. Jay Gooden wants better communication from Michigan State University and its staff when informing students of changes due to COVID-19. Gooden, 22, Spartan Remix co-director at Michigan State University, said he is worried about his lack of drive, lack of being able to be social and most of all, not receiving the full experience of acting with in-person class. MSU planned on resuming in-person classes for undergraduates when the semester starts Sept. 2 but reversed their decision Tuesday and moved most classes entirely online.

Restaurants feel loss when internationals students leave

Every summer Ginny Cheung makes the decision to close her East Lansing Chinese restaurant for a few weeks to travel. With her largely Asian college student customer base on summer break, it didn’t make financial sense to keep the doors open. But this summer, East Café located at 1001 E. Grand River Ave. didn’t close its doors. “There are still a few students staying for the summer,” she said.

#MeToo campaign causing stir across MSU campus

After The New York Times published a stunning article saying Hollywood Producer Harvey Weinstein has been sexually abusing various Hollywood actresses and models throughout his career, the discussion of sexual assault has surfaced to the front page news. The article stated that Weinstein, popular for movies like Django Unchained and Gangs of New York reached many settlements with women who accused him of sexual abuse. Actress Ashley Judd came out criticizing the producer saying he sexually assaulted her when she was a young, eager actress trying to break into the business. Judd is not the only actress that has come forward.  Since then, actresses like Gwyneth Paltrow, Angelina Jolie, Kate Beckinsale and 54 others have come forward with stories about Weinstein’s abuse. Alyssa Milano, popular for her role on King of Queens and Saved By The Bell posted on Twitter “If you’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted write ‘me too’ as a reply to this tweet.”

Backpacks and diaper bags: affording student life and parenthood

AUDIO: Full-time student and full-time parent. Being a college student is already expensive, but imagining being a parent as well. With the rising cost of tuition averaging $12,000 a year, housing, books, along with diapers, baby formula and more, it can be financially overwhelming. For some it can seem impossible to live a balance like that. Yet there’s some that can make it work.

Live comfortably, or affordably? College students have to choose

Over the last few years East Lansing, Mich. has seen a drastic increase of apartment complexes. Prior to before there are more options than ever, for East Lansing residents. More and more these apartment are coming with amenities that will have college students at Michigan State University living better than some working adults. Apartment companies like SkyVue , DTN, and Hannah Lofts just to name a few are dominating the millennial housing market in the area.

Spring break another financial stress for college students

College in the spring is all about spring break. Yet, spring break vacation can be expensive. Students already having to pay for the new school year can be another financial stress putting together a vacation. Luckily, planning early help to make it more affordable. Michigan State student Albertina Mays is an expert at saving money for spring break.

Young adults are finding themselves living at home to cover costs

 

When 24-year-old Ben Zink moved to Los Angeles last March, he was hoping that he would be able to sustain himself and accomplish his major goal: moving out of his parent’s house. “I feel like I should be living on my own,” said Zink, who graduated from Grand Valley State University. “I know my parents do not mind, but I still feel bad just being here.”

Despite working as a production assistant at Helo Productions, cooking at Buffalo Wild Wings and interning at Therapy Studios, Zink ran through all of his savings in just three months in Los Angeles. “I moved home because I basically ran out of money,” Zink said. “I had less than $500 in my bank account and I needed some of it to even get back.”

But Zink’s not alone: 19 percent of college graduates find themselves living at home, according to a recent study by the Pew Research Center.

New push aims to close skills gap between graduates and jobs

By BRIDGET BUSH
Capital News Service
LANSING – Michigan lawmakers, university officials and local school systems have taken up the fight to improve how well the state’s students learn to be high tech producers and consumers. Just this fall, Michigan State University redesigned a course that will teach 175 student teachers to incorporate computational thinking into curriculum. And the university is offering a new graduate certificate in creative computing to about 250 teachers for professional development. Aman Yadav, MSU associate professor of counseling, educational psychology and special education and director of its Masters of Arts in Educational Technology program, sees the greater purpose of this new approach to be “moving students from consumers of technology to creators and producers.”
Meanwhile,  lawmakers are considering a bill that would allow computer programming to count as a foreign language or arts requirement. The bill was approved by the House in May and is in the Senate Committee on Education.