Drug addiction: Resources are available for Bath, DeWitt residents

Drug abuse in Michigan is an immense problem surrounding the entire state. In 2015, Michigan had the seventh-most drug overdoses in the nation, according to data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Even small areas such as Bath and DeWitt Townships have seen drug use within its borders. While these townships are small, they have managed to make statewide news with their drug issues over the last few years, including an August meth lab raid in a DeWitt motel that sent two people into custody. Clinton County, which the townships of Bath and DeWitt fall under, suffered one death from a heroin overdose and three others died from opiate-related causes in 2013, according to Stopping Addiction with Family Education (SAFE).

Williamston schools stand firm against firearms in educational environment

In the wake of previous mass shootings that have occurred around the U.S, a Michigan senate committee have approved bills that would allow concealed weapons in gun-free zones, such as a public school or church. The legislation would allow schools to prohibit students from carrying concealed weapons, along with employees, which may or may not help a life-threatening situation. The Williamston community is one of many who have not faced the challenge of a mass shooting, but they still stand strong against the proposed statewide bill. Superintendent of Williamston Schools Adam Spina completely disagrees with the proposed legislation and he said the Ingham County stands firmly in opposition. “If you are asking the people who do this for a living every day and are here in schools, there is no one of my knowledge who is an advocate,” Spina said.

Sexual objectification: Is it a problem? How do we solve it?

EAST LANSING, Mich. — During Halloween in 2016, Sharon Thomas, a human biology major at University of Michigan, was walking through the neighborhood of Cedar Village around 8 p.m. when a man called her from across the street. “He said, ‘Hey, baby, you look fine,’ then he ran over to me from across the road,” said Thomas.  “I didn’t really register what he was doing at the moment.”

Thomas said the man ran up to her and grabbed her waist while complimenting her. She pushed him away physically, but she couldn’t get him out of her mind.

Ingham 911 centers paid over $1 million in overtime

After a September meeting that saw Ingham County Controller Tim Dolehanty say that the county’s 911 dispatch center was facing a ‘crisis point’ in its staffing, recent campaigns to increase applications have yielded a handful of applicants and trainees. However, dispatch center director Lance Langdon is facing a problem that has begun to plague local governments across the nation.

Citizens in Meridian Township are not surprised to learn of the church shooting in Texas

Tabitha Mpamira was at work scrolling through social media when she suddenly thought, “here we go again”. It has happened again. Another mass shooting in the United States has captured the media’s attention and some citizens of Meridian Township are not surprised. “I’ve seriously grown cynical,” said Tabitha Mpamira, who is a citizen of Okemos. “ I figured here we go again, and nothing is going to be done and something else is going to come up and take over the news.”

On Sunday, 26-year-old Devin Patrick Kelley, grabbed his AR-556 rifle, and opened fire

in First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, TX.

WATCH: Accident injures 2 on campus

Here are today’s headlines from the Spartan Newsroom:

Two athletes were hit by a truck and injured riding mopeds on North Shaw Lane. Four people killed and two people were injured when a gunman opened fire in Northern California. Are you ready for some ribs or some brisket? A new BBQ joint opens in Okemos. Australia legalizes same-sex marriage resulting in a huge celebration.

It’s time to pick up leaves in DeWitt

Every fall, the community of DeWitt partake in the Fall Leaf Pick Up Program. The Fall Leaf Pick Up Program is a citywide program that begins each year with a city wide sweep in early October and will continue until the final week of November. Even though it is not a mandatory program, however it’s encouraged for community members to get involved. If residents are looking to burn their leaves instead of leaving them on the curb of your house, it’s prohibited. The City’s Fire Prevention Code prohibits the open burning of grass clippings and leaves.