Image from Fenner Nature center. Photo taken by Andy Chmura

Urbanization could actually help improve Lansing’s natural environment

Spring is coming. It may not feel like it today, it may not feel like it tomorrow and it may not even feel like it in the middle of May. Nevertheless, it is coming. Soon, the smell of freshly-cut grass on a neighbor’s lawn or the fragrance of a beautiful young wildflower will remind us something we often forget in the winter. There is nature around us and it is worth protecting.

An alternative story format, or ASF, highlighting the pros and cons of Daylight Saving Time. Infographic by: Casey Harrison.

Feeling tired? Your body may be working overtime to rebound from Daylight Saving Time

It’s one of the most loved and hated times of the year — depending on how you feel about Daylight Saving Time. When it comes to springing forward, the good thing is the days become longer, you conserve a small amount of electricity, and in all likelihood, you’re outside more than in the winter. The cons, however, include losing that coveted extra hour of sleep, and multiple health risk factors, like increased stress levels, car crash rates, and an increase in heart attacks and strokes. Whether you’re in Lansing Township, Michigan or Anchorage, Alaska, the effects of daylight saving can be both a blessing and a curse.

DelhiTownship

Cedar Lake Trail Head access point in the works

The Delhi Township Development Authority (DDA) is in the process of applying for a Michigan Department of Natural Resources Trust Fund (MNRTF) grant that could provide up to $300,000 toward an access point to Cedar Lake for recreation activities. The Cedar Lake Trail Head as it is called will allow for parking and access to trails as well as a launch for canoes and kayaks. A public input meeting was held on Feb. 21 where the project was discussed before the Delhi Township Board of Trustees and recommended for a public hearing on March 7. The application will be sent to the Michigan DNR.