Refugee Appreciation Day brings the Lansing community together

On Nov. 5, people from the Greater Lansing community attended the Refugee Appreciation Day event hosted by the Refugee Development Center (RDC) at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Greater Lansing. A reception was held to honor refugee stories from the Center and an art show was presented by the Niagara Foundation’s youth. High school students from the area participated in the art show creating  displays based on the theme “Compassion in Action.”

These displays shared the many ways that people can cultivate compassion into their daily lives and the lives of others. Mariah Shafer currently works as the senior school liaison with the Refugee Development Center and volunteers in  organization since 2007.

Expanding modes of transportation in DeWitt Township

The City of Dewitt, Dewitt Township and the Clinton County Road Commission have come together to provide walking and biking paths throughout Dewitt Township. Dewitt Township is calling it the Non-Motorized Transportation Plan, which will be making walking and biking much more desired modes of transportation.  

“The township adopted a non-motorized transportation plan in 2013, so this is one of the projects that was identified on that plan,” said Rod Taylor, Dewitt Township manager.  We started working on it in a concentrated fashion in 2015.”

“The Non-Motorized Transportation Plan identified 60 different projects where we ranked those projects based upon a weighted system that looked at safety issues, connection with commercial areas, schools, and neighborhoods,” said Taylor.  “In addition, this project was a joint venture with the City of Dewitt as well as the Clinton County Road Commission.

LCC comedy play running for second consecutive weekend

Lansing Community College’s theater department is playing the comedy “The Government Inspector,” a play that takes place in 19th century Russia. The first two shows happened on Friday, Nov. 3,  and Saturday, Nov. 4, at the Dart Auditorium at 8:00 p.m.. The next showing is Friday, Nov.

Tricked-out cars treat children at Halloween event

The First Christian Church in Lansing hosted its annual Trunk-or-Treat event on Oct. 29, following the morning’s service. Community members decorated the trunks of their cars and handed out candy to children. The event began around 12:30 p.m. and lasted about an hour, with many kids coming to trick-or-treat. Attendees were not just from the church, as the event was open to anyone who wanted to participate.

Ingham county residents enjoy free zoo day  

Potter Park Zoo welcomed Ingham county tourists with free admission on Oct.7. This event happens every year on the first Saturday of October. “Doing a free day is a sort of giving back to them (residents), since they supported us,” said Sarah Pechtel, the general curator of the zoo. “Free day is also a great way to experience something positive from that,” Pechtel continued. Encompassing over 20 acres and featuring more than 500 individual animals of  160 different species, the Potter Park Zoo has three conservation efforts that support the black rhino, red panda, and Puerto Rican crested toad.

Teddy Bear Posse comforts children in distress

The third year of Ingham County’s Teddy Bear Posse rounded up thousands of the stuffed animals. Bears will be given to first responders and local agencies to help ease trauma for children found to be in stressful situations.

Hall of Justice celebrates anniversary with food and friends

A celebration for the Michigan Hall of Justice’s 15th anniversary had a surprising turnout for the organizers, vendors, and guests that attended the event on Oct.06. The hall was celebrated with food trucks parked out in front of the building, serving employees and other guests from 11:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Laura Stoken, the Manager of Constituents for the Office of the Governor, said the event was a testament of the love and support for the people that work in the building. “We’re here to support the Hall of Justice and congratulate them on [the] 15th anniversary of occupying this gorgeous building,” Stoken said. The Michigan Hall of Justice is the headquarters for the state’s judicial branch of government, having courtrooms for the Michigan Supreme Court and the Court of Appeals. Lynn Seaks, the Community Outreach Coordinator for the Michigan Supreme Court, said there were more people than they had anticipated.

Lansing residents talk about their city

“There’s almost always something to do here and free. Lansing is blooming right now, during the summer the Lansing city parks were very popular for their concerts and events.”

Nancy Heldt, Elementary School Cafeteria Employee.  

 

“Lansing is a city on the cusp of serious change… changing demographics, changing economic drivers, changing political characteristics.”

Dr. Bryan Beverly, Research Assistant and Coordinator of the Fellowship of Instructional Leaders with MSU’s College of Education, Office of K-12 Outreach and Lansing School Board member.  

“We have a lot of diversity here in Lansing. It’s not like on the outskirts where it’s not diverse.

‘It’s not easy’ being part of Lansing’s heavy metal music scene

The history of metal music can be traced back to England, when economic growth became slower and unemployment started rising after World War II. Black Sabbath, the first major heavy metal band, formed and expressed the feelings of desolation. Then the metal music spread all over the world. Today in Lansing, the metal music bands, or underground music society, has a foundation of the audiences in these years, but still facing a lot of difficulties. “It’s not easy, being any musician, especially in a metal band, is very difficult,” said Alfonso Civile, the booking agent at the Loft, a venue dedicated to live, original touring music in Lansing.