Citizen Yoga instructors, practitioners discuss outdoor classes and practicing in a pandemic

Courtesy of Lindsey YoakumLindsey Yoakum stretches during an outside yoga class

“Yoga has saved me,” is a common expression stated by yoga teachers and practitioners alike. “I’m a different person [because of it],” said Daniel Johnson, yoga practitioner. “I have this whole thread of joy that I never had before.”

Due to COVID-19 shutting down exercise facilities such as gyms and yoga studios, there is now a greater demand for different methods of exercise. That is why Citizen Yoga has curated alternative ways for yoga practitioners to enjoy an hour’s worth of peace and quiet with their Zoom classes and new, free outdoor yoga at Grand Circus Park in Detroit. The summer classes began June 21 and take place every Sunday at 7 p.m. through Aug.

Geo-Whatting?

By Kristen Alberti
Listen Up, Lansing

You’re sitting in a park enjoying a lovely afternoon with some friends. The sun is shining, the birds are chirping, and a group of people are running around behind you searching through trees and bushes. Your curiosity is piqued when you see them whip out GPS systems, but you never get the guts to ask them what they’re doing. Meanwhile, Jessica Rehling, a student behavior and conflict resolution administrator at Michigan State University, is leading a group of her friends on a trip through the forest to find a geocache, or as she would say, a hidden treasure. Geocaching is like a scavenger hunt made by anyone around you, said Rehling.

Bath Farmer’s Market offers town alternative ideas

In today’s impersonal world, where people often buy their food at a supermarket, a farmer’s market can help create a special sense of community. Dru Montri, the owner of Ten Hens Farm in Bath and the director of the Michigan Farmer’s Market Association, was approached to help begin the Bath Farmer’s Market in 2010. “I think people in the town were starved for something to happen,” said  Jeff Garrity, the owner of Laughing Crane Farm, which maintains a booth at the market. Garrity, who is also the township treasurer, said that a total of 53 people showed up at the initial organizing meeting, a significant turnout for a town of  roughly 2,000. Towns across the nation are set up in neighborhoods, supermarkets and impersonal settings.

State parks lure visitors with free sports, classes

By SARA MATTHEWS
Capital News Service
LANSING —
If you want to know if that latest fitness trend lives up to the hype, you can find out for free in Michigan’s state parks. They’re offering more than just trail running. Beginner kayaking, windsurfing, and even stand-up paddle boarding – what the Wall Street Journal recently referred to as the “fitness rage of the summer” – are just a few of the classes in Recreation 101. The program is designed to get people into state parks. Local outfitters volunteer their expertise and gear in beginner classes that also include archery, disc golf and orienteering.

Environmental education combats `nature deficit disorder’ among children

By SAM INGLOT
Capital News Service
LANSING — By the age of 5, the average child will have watched as many hours of television as the classroom time it takes to earn a college degree. “In essence, a 5-year-old has the equivalent of a college degree in television watching,” said Tom Occhipinti, the environmental education coordinator for the Department of Environmental Quality. “The youngest generation today is not getting outdoors at all. They’ve got too much indoors to keep them busy.”
Occhipinti’s program produces environment-related teaching materials for schools across the state. Television, computers and video games keep young people inside at an unhealthy rate, Occhipinti said.