COVID-19 cases on rise in Mid-Michigan

Michigan’s stay-at-home order was not extended by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer after June 12, opening the possibility for students to return to classes, allowing restaurants and bars to open in person dining, and retail stores to open with safety restrictions in place. 

Since then, COVID-19 cases in the state have been on the rise in mid-Michigan, and statewide according the State of Michigan’s COVID-19 data. CDC guidelines have been released on how to mitigate the virus, but ideas differ based on what is happening in each community, in which health professionals and experts are being put to the task on finding ways that work for their community.  

Courtesy of Jad Safadi

The question remains: Is it safe to resume certain activities, like dining out, going to public gatherings and shopping? Central Michigan University associate professor, and Division Director of Health Administration at CMU, Nailya Delellis said that financial reasons and quality of education are some wide-spread attempt to bring students back to college campuses, but still had some doubts about this being a possibility as cases are rising in the mid-Michigan area. Courtesy of Jad Safadi

“The National Institute of Health (NIH) in March stated that virus may stay on surfaces up to three days; how many people will be touching same door handle in a dorm or in a classroom,” said Delellis.  “If classes starts on Aug. 17, and if according to World Health Organization (WHO) incubation period is from five to six to 14 days, you will see a spike by the end of August.

Six Lansing-area fire stations receive grant

At fire departments, training happens all the time. It’s essential to the safety of both the firefighters and the people they protect, and according to Delhi Township Fire Chief Brian Ball, that training is about to get a lot easier, thanks a one million dollar state grant dispersed to six Lansing-area fire stations. “Instead of Delhi having to build and staff two more fire stations, I can use the city of Lansing for assistance and trust that they’ve been trained at the same level as Delhi as Delta, as Lansing Township or Meridian or East Lansing,” he said. Ball also said that the grant will allow for more up-to-date, specialized equipment. “We’ll get ballistic helmets, ballistic vests, we’ll get more medical treatment equipment, cots, studio monitor reviews, CPR machines,” he said.

Changes to CATA route could improve commute between Mason and Lansing

By Daniel Hamburg
Mason Times staff writer

A grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development is helping to gather input from citizens in Mason and Lansing about adding additional CATA bus service between both cities. Route 46, the bus route between Mason and Lansing, runs one northbound trip daily at 7:05 a.m. from downtown Mason, and one southbound trip at 5 p.m. from the CATA transportation center in downtown Lansing. Doug Klein, executive director of the Mason Area Chamber of Commerce, said the proposed change would add one more bus in the morning and evening, possibly an hour later than both times, alleviating problems of many people working a 9 to 5 job. The Mason Area Chamber of Commerce, the City of Mason and the Mid-Michigan Program for Greater Sustainability are some of the organizations looking to determine if adding routes would benefit both CATA and citizens who live or work in Mason. Julie Powers, executive director of the Mid-Michigan Environmental Action Council, says the grant of about $5,000 is being used to assess the need of more public transportation, as well as enable community members to get involved in the transportation planning process.

Ready or not? Residents are stocking up on salt and shovels

By Daniel Hamburg
Mason Times staff writer

At Ace Hardware on Cedar Street, Manager Chris Iott says if you wait too long, it’s too late. That’s the case for hundreds of residents in Mason, who have snow- and ice-covered sidewalks and roadways. Part of the problem is people not adequately prepared, according to Iott. “People will prepare for summer because they know they’re going to have to mow the lawn,” Iott said. “People don’t prepare as much for winter because you may or may not get big snow.

Oak wilt is killing Michigan oak trees

By: Lia Kananipuamaeole Kamana
Ingham County Chronicle staff writer

Michigan oak trees don’t have to worry just about getting cleared out for the construction of neighborhoods, homes, businesses and schools anymore. These days an oak tree’s biggest concern is a fungus known as oak wilt that constricts the water-conducting vessels. According to Steve Martinko of Michigan Organic Tree Care, the first kind of infection occurs in the leaves and spreads through the branches, trunks and roots.  

“The roots take the pathogen and disperse the infection like cancer,” said Martinko. Once oak wilt infects a tree, there is no cure and the best thing to do is start protecting nearby trees from getting infected.

Schor holds first constituent coffee at Avenue Café


By Lia Kananipuamaeole Kamana
Ingham County Chronicle staff writer

On Saturday, Feb. 16, State Representative of the 68th District, Andy Schor, held his first “Coffee time with Andy” at the Avenue Café in Lansing. Thirteen people heard Schor voice his ideas and concerns, and had a chance to tell him about their ideas and concerns. Topics ranged from education to gun handling and public roads to jobs. There will be a listening tour for House Democrats and a budget town hall meeting in March with the next “Coffee time with Andy” set to take place in April.

Focal Point Fall 2012 [Show 2]

With elections coming up soon and debates underway, we take a look at how much students care about the 2012 elections. And if they do care, will they choose to vote absentee and how do they decide who to vote for? Students living at St. Anne’s lofts react to the many empty promises from the complex. MSU’s homecoming parade and float building is a great start for a week of Spartan pride as Sparty watch goes underway before the big game against Michigan.

Focal Point Fall 2012 [Show 1]

Herman Cain visits MSU as a part of a nationwide “College Truth Tour” and students react to whether or not they’ll get on the “Cain Train.” MSU is undergoing several renovations while the City Center redevelopment project is delayed once again. ESPN Game day comes to Michigan States and students are getting excited about the new MSU hockey student section. Students also try sinking some shots behind the Rock to win Izzone Tickets. Reporters: Lauren Gentile, Chloe Hill, Josh Sidorowicz and Edith Zhou

Focal Point is an Emmy awarding winning, student produced newscast from the School of Journalism at Michigan State University.

Student premieres movie, joins ranks of mid-Mich. filmmakers

By Marina Csomor
Ingham County staff writer

EAST LANSING — When Brandon Laventure and his brother, Cameron Laventure, decided on a site to shoot their first feature film, “Apocalypse Theory,” they knew they wouldn’t have to go far. “We wanted to work with locations that we were well-acquainted with,” said Brandon Laventure, writer and producer of “Apocalypse Theory.” “We chose East Lansing as the setting in which we wanted to write it and shoot it because it was a setting we were familiar with. It was great.”

On Feb. 24, the brothers premiered their movie, a college comedy about two brothers coming to terms with the possibility of the world’s imminent end, to students in Michigan State University’s Wells Hall. The movie featured scenes shot at Michigan State’s Mayo Hall and in downtown East Lansing at businesses including Wanderer’s Teahouse, 547 E. Grand River Ave.

CART Single Stream Recycling

The city of Lansing has adopted single-stream recycling to make collecting more efficient. Using old trash compactor trucks, residents are able to recycle many new things, without having to sort it. Despite efforts to raise awareness of the new program, there are many residents who don’t know about the changes and that it’s easier for them to recycle now than ever before. Steve Chalker, Recycling Coordinator, said that they are able to collect twice the amount of recyclables with this new system than they did before–that means less trash and a better environment. He also said that the efficiency comes at no extra cost to residents.