Eastern Market implements new guidelines, business models to cater to the health, safety of guests

Courtesy of Samuel MorykwasShoppers attend the Flower Day Market in Eastern Market

Eastern Market has been one of Detroit, Michigan’s most prominent tourist destinations for over 150 years. With the COVID-19 pandemic going on, the market has remained open, but with new safety measures implemented. Sam Morykwas, marketing manager for Eastern Market, explained that Eastern Market wanted to ensure the safety of its guests and to make sure that they were complying with the state and city’s safety initiatives. Eastern Market uses several safety measures to limit face-to-face interactions and to keep the vendors and guests safe. These measures include sanitizing services and handwashing stations for the staff and guests, a taped 6-by-6-foot grid for a visual guide to help maintain social distancing, no longer allowing sampling from vendors, contact-free payments, additional signs to encourage people to distance themselves, required masks upon entry, temporary fencing around the market and a north and south entry point into the shed to regulate the flow of traffic.

Fall draws locals to Meridian Township market

Purchasing locally grown produce can be done every year at the Meridian Township Farmers’ market. The market hosts over 20 vendors every Saturday and Wednesday from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m.

Some vendors have been partnering with Meridian selling products for years, and other vendors include new entrepreneurs like Bri Makaric, MSU student and founder of Brite Bites. “My company is not over a year old yet and so growing customer base is very important,” said Makaric. “Meridian Township Farmers’ Market has allowed me to sell my products and grow customers from the local area.”

The Meridian Township farmers’ market is not limited to vendors who live in Meridian, but is also open to vendors outside of Meridian Township as well. They come from towns as far as Grand Rapids and as close as Lansing.

Feeling the squeeze-more Manhattan natives moving to NYC’s boroughs

NEW YORK — As more people move into a city, population, housing and overall living expenses seem to go one way—up. Manhattan is no different. People move in, prices increase, and those who have lived in a neighborhood their entire life may find that they can no longer afford it, said Nicole Gelinas a Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute, a local based think tank, and an expert in state and local fiscal policy, along with public transportation and infrastructure. The cost of living has changed significantly over several different time periods, and for different reasons she said. “Since the financial crisis, so we’ll say since 2008, the sales market has certainly increased markedly in prices,” Gelinas said.

Gun sales for 2016 to topple previous year’s record

American gun company shares are down, but gun sales are up amidst election scares and Black Friday sales. After Donald Trump defeated Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election, popular handgun manufacturer Smith & Wesson saw a 25 percent decrease in their share price in just two days. Similarly, .22 caliber firearm giant, Ruger fell from from a high of $64.40 a share to just $47.50 a share in the same amount of time. This plunge was the result of the end of a period of pre-election uncertainty.  

Market instability is common for unpredictable presidential election years.

Holt Farmers' Market seeing record sales this year

By Carrie Lynch
Holt Journal staff reporter

The Holt Farmers’ Market has extended its hours and is now open every Saturday all year round due to increasing sales from vendors. Marcy Bishop Kates, executive director and cofounder of Holt Community Connect — a nonprofit organization to help the community thrive — said that market sales have broke a record of over $5,000 this past year. The market is located at 2150 Cedar Street, which is the former fire department building. Market Manager Chuck Grinnell says the increase in sales is due to the growing amount of customers as well as vendors. “Our customer base has grown such that it can support a year round market, we have vendors that rely on year round sales income, and making the best use of an indoor facility, ” says Grinnell.

Bath Farmer’s Market offers town alternative ideas

In today’s impersonal world, where people often buy their food at a supermarket, a farmer’s market can help create a special sense of community. Dru Montri, the owner of Ten Hens Farm in Bath and the director of the Michigan Farmer’s Market Association, was approached to help begin the Bath Farmer’s Market in 2010. “I think people in the town were starved for something to happen,” said  Jeff Garrity, the owner of Laughing Crane Farm, which maintains a booth at the market. Garrity, who is also the township treasurer, said that a total of 53 people showed up at the initial organizing meeting, a significant turnout for a town of  roughly 2,000. Towns across the nation are set up in neighborhoods, supermarkets and impersonal settings.

Meridian Township Farmer's Market 2011 Information

With interviews, taste samples, photos, video, newscasts and more, I will bring the Meridian Township Farmer’s Market experience to interested viewers and readers this upcoming week,

I would highly recommend families, senior citizens, single or married people of all ages check out the Meridian Township Farmer’s Market at least once this summer. After all, until October there are two days a week, one can attend this market. Wednesday’s and Saturday’s from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. There are numerous vendor’s one could check out. There is good and healthy food for every man, women and child.  Vendors must follow 29 rules in a four-page document; these rules are clearly stated so violations should be minimal.