Old bikes get recycled into burgeoning rental programs

By ALEXANDER SMITH
Capital News Service
LANSING — As the number of abandoned bikes grows on college campuses, bike rental programs flourish. In New York, abandoned bikes are recycled or trashed. In Denver, they are auctioned and the proceeds go to the city’s general fund. Elsewhere they are donated to charities. In Michigan, some colleges are recycling them into bike rental programs.
The University of Michigan and Western Michigan University have programs stocked with brand new bikes.

Eighty more miles of bicycle paths coming to Ingham County

By Griffin Wasik
Ingham County Chronicle Staff Reporter

The Meridian Township Board of Commissioners recently unanimously passed a revision to the Pedestrian-Bicycle Master Plan will add nearly 80 more miles of bicycle paths on shoulders of roads, cross-country paths, and unpaved roads to Ingham County. There are currently about 110 miles of such paths, according to meeting officials. The plan will improve safety for pedestrians and cyclists who are trying to access parks, businesses, or people out exercising, according to meeting officials. The master plan deals with much bigger things, Ron Styka, a trustee member on the Meridian Township Board of Commissioners, said. “Our goal is to have people be able to travel anywhere in this township by biking or hiking all the way to Lansing,” Styka said.

Bicycles growing in popularity, says Old Town bike shop owner

By Zachary Swiecicki
Old Town Lansing Times Staff Reporter

While traveling along Grand River Avenue in Old Town Lansing, you can see CATA buses, cars, trucks, bicycles, motorcycles, or pedestrians walking around. Chad Cottom, owner of SPIN Bicycle Shop, has seen the change in transportation in the eight years his store has been open.  Cottom is passionate about bikes and is committed to providing his bikes to the residents of Old Town. “I would say cycling has become a little more popular,” Cottom said.  “I would hope to say that we’ve helped a little bit to adding to that by having a bicycle shop in Old Town.”

Tri-County Regional Planning Commission look to residents and professionals for brainstorming sessions

By Missy Sebring
Ingham County Chronicle staff writer

The Tri-County Regional Planning Commission asked members of nearby communities and professionals from across the country to put their heads together on ways to improve the Michigan Avenue and Grand River Avenue corridor with a charrette. A charrette is a planning and design session for problem solving. While these changes won’t happen overnight, they will give the planning commission direction on what the community wants for the future. Open houses and design sessions were held in Lansing and Okemos from Oct. 22-30.

MSU Bike Share

As bike clutter worsens around campus, ASMSU says they have a fix. “The idea is: create a bike sharing community,” said ASMSU VP for Finance and Operations, Mike Mozina. With nearly 50,000 students enrolled at MSU, bike racks are overflowing. ASMSU wants to implement a program where students could pay for shared bikes when they need to get around campus. Students could either rent bikes at $1 per hour or buy a year-long membership for $50.