Medical marijuana survey presents new possibilities for Bath residents

The Michigan Medical Marijuana Act establishes state law immunity to prosecution of those who use marijuana for medical purposes. This act was voter initiated and establishes qualifying patient and primary caregiver status. In Bath Township, Planning Director Brian Shorkey created a survey for the Bath community on new medical marijuana facility regulations, and whether or not it is right for the Township. “We want to hear from our residents first,” Shorkey said. “This is a big step within our community.

State ramps up opioid response

By COLTON WOOD
Capital News Service
LANSING — Last October, President Donald Trump called the nation’s opioid crisis a public emergency. Now, six months after his announcement, Michigan has taken more steps to strengthen the state’s battle against opioids. “The news has definitely been reporting on the opioid crisis for a while now, and, yes, it continues,” said Monica Gonzalez-Walker, the clinical implementation and engagement manager of Michigan OPEN — the Michigan Opioid Prescribing Engagement Network. Data published by the governor’s office says the number of opioid prescriptions dispensed has decreased by 10.7 percent since 2015. For the first time since 2011, the total number of controlled substance prescriptions dispensed in Michigan dropped to below 20 million.

More alternatives needed for criminal suspects with mental health problems, advocates say

BY COLTON WOOD
Capital News Service
LANSING — As more communities in Michigan join the fight for jail diversion programs for inmates with special needs, Lt. Gov. Brian Calley said he hopes it will soon become a mainstream program. The Snyder administration created a diversion program to reduce the number of people with  special needs entering Michigan’s corrections system. “It was informal in the beginning, and then we formalized it part way through our first term,” Calley said. “I served as a chair of the diversion council, and its mental health diversion. That’s what we’re trying to accomplish.”
The program works with pilot committees from counties across the state that want mental health-related changes in corrections facilities
“Our system in the past has been a one-size-fits-all approach,” Calley said.

More alternatives needed for criminal suspects with mental health problems, advocates say

BY COLTON WOOD
Capital News Service
LANSING — As more communities in Michigan join the fight for jail diversion programs for inmates with special needs, Lt. Gov. Brian Calley said he hopes it will soon become a mainstream program. The Snyder administration created a diversion program to reduce the number of people with  special needs entering Michigan’s corrections system. “It was informal in the beginning, and then we formalized it part way through our first term,” Calley said. “I served as a chair of the diversion council, and its mental health diversion. That’s what we’re trying to accomplish.”
The program works with pilot committees from counties across the state that want mental health-related changes in corrections facilities
“Our system in the past has been a one-size-fits-all approach,” Calley said.

More alternatives needed for criminal suspects with mental health problems, advocates say

BY COLTON WOOD
Capital News Service
LANSING — As more communities in Michigan join the fight for jail diversion programs for inmates with special needs, Lt. Gov. Brian Calley said he hopes it will soon become a mainstream program. The Snyder administration created a diversion program to reduce the number of people with  special needs entering Michigan’s corrections system. “It was informal in the beginning, and then we formalized it part way through our first term,” Calley said. “I served as a chair of the diversion council, and its mental health diversion. That’s what we’re trying to accomplish.”
The program works with pilot committees from counties across the state that want mental health-related changes in corrections facilities
“Our system in the past has been a one-size-fits-all approach,” Calley said.

More alternatives needed for criminal suspects with mental health problems, advocates say

BY COLTON WOOD
Capital News Service
LANSING — As more communities in Michigan join the fight for jail diversion programs for inmates with special needs, Lt. Gov. Brian Calley said he hopes it will soon become a mainstream program. The Snyder administration created a diversion program to reduce the number of people with  special needs entering Michigan’s corrections system. “It was informal in the beginning, and then we formalized it part way through our first term,” Calley said. “I served as a chair of the diversion council, and its mental health diversion. That’s what we’re trying to accomplish.”
The program works with pilot committees from counties across the state that want mental health-related changes in corrections facilities
“Our system in the past has been a one-size-fits-all approach,” Calley said.

Michigan reversing prison population boom of ‘90s

By GLORIA NZEKA
Capital News Service
LANSING — Following the closing of some correctional facilities in recent years, the size of Michigan’s prison population is at its lowest in two decades. Criminal justice experts, however say, there’s still more to be done. John Cooper, the policy director for the Citizens Alliance on Prisons and Public Spending, a nonprofit public policy organization, said the Department of Corrections’ current recidivism rate of 28 percent isn’t a good measurement of what’s going on in the criminal justice system. “To have 28 percent of people who got out of prison return still is a very high rate,” Cooper said. “We don’t want anybody to be going back to prison.”
Earlier this year, the department reported that the prison population is below 40,000 for the first time since 1992.

Spartans raise sexual assault awareness by swiping card

April is the focal point of social media campaigns and organized campus events recognizing Sexual Assault Awareness Month. The Michigan State University Federal Credit Union is helping increase awareness and healing for those affected by sexual violence in the “It All Adds Up” campaign.