“Schools of Choice” and modern segregation

Zachary Barnes explores the roots of segregation during the early part of the 20th century in Lansing area schools, and how it compares to modern-day segregation — meaning those who have the privilege to, can transfer to another school, leaving a larger number of minority and economically disadvantaged without funding for resources. Segregation — “the separation or isolation of a race, class, or ethnic group by enforced or voluntary residence in a restricted area, by barriers to social intercourse, by separate educational facilities, or by other discriminatory means.” — Merriam Webster

Although it may not be segregation in the traditional sense, policies such as “red lining,” where minority neighborhoods were outlined in red on a city’s master plan meaning “high-risk” under rules laid out by the Federal Housing Administration. Both direct and indirect racism has lead to major inequities in the classroom. According to MSU education professors and non-profits that work to better education for minority students, these inequities have lead to resource gaps and unequal opportunity. A main reason for this, “Schools of Choice,” the process where families can choose to apply to another school district within the same region. It could be time to revisit the 1994 legislation as schools become increasingly segregated.

#TakeAKnee: Is it your right?

The movement that we are now calling the #TakeAKnee protest has moved to the forefront of conversation in America and has garnered the attention of many. Some people, including President Donald Trump, are calling the movement disrespectful to the American flag and veterans who have fought for the country, while others say its meant to protest a long-standing battle against white supremacy in America. Former Michigan State University quarterback Bill Feraco, recalls his experiences during his journey to the Cotton Bowl of 1968, on the brink of the civil rights movement. Feraco remembers a somber time for his teammates after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King when it seemed that some of his teammates had had enough, and decided to do something about it.

Amid racial tensions, black students find refuge in religious groups

Q&A: Student organization doubles as a safe haven for minority students at MSU

The Black Lives Matter movement was born out of the outpouring of grief and frustration following the death of Trayvon Martin in 2012 – a young, unarmed black man who was shot while walking in a gated neighborhood – and the subsequent acquittal of the man who killed him. In the five years since Martin’s death, the Black Lives Matter movement has gained momentum, driven by the killings of Sandra Bland, Mike Brown, Eric Garner, Philando Castile and other black people at the hands of the police. The movement has grown into an international network of more than 30 chapters. College campuses across the country have used various platforms to respond to and/or participate in efforts led by Black Lives Matter. At Michigan State University, a student-run Christian organization encourages students to use religious faith as a tool to combat racial tension.

Does makeup have diversity?

EAST LANSING, Michigan — For years, men and women have struggled with the idea of finding the right shade of beauty for their skin and having it fit to their complexion and skin type.  

There has always been a debate between drugstore makeup companies like Maybelline and Covergirl compared to high-brand cosmetic companies like Urban Decay and Rihanna’s new line “Fenty Beauty.”

Christopher George, who works at Sephora in Lansing and is responsible for matching customers to the right type of makeup for their skin type, said, “Many people have said that the difference between drugstore and Sephora is the quality. Though that may be true, it’s probably just based on their skin type.”

Skin type is different for every person. One can be oily and one can be dry. No one has the same skin type — just like no one has the same skin color.

Lack of funding affects Michigan schools

Twenty-one-year-old Tim Ashley loves his job. “The job was fun, I like being at a job standing up walking a lot it’s better than being at a desk or a chair for eight hours,” he said.  

His mom, Nancy Ashley, never thought he’d be able to hold the job he has today. “Our son Tim Ashley was born in 1996 and he was diagnosed with Noonan Syndrome,” Ashley said. 

Noonan syndrome affects his cognitive and physical abilities. Nancy Ashley credits Tim’s success to the special education programs he receives attending high school, but a recent task force committee determined special education is underfunded by 700-million dollars.

Athletic Doping – Local MSU athletes say it’s not worth it

On Dec. 5, the International Olympics Committee ruled that Russia will be suspended from the 2018 Winter Olympic Games because of doping. The country had two scandals back in the 2014 and 2016 Olympic Games, and now they are paying the price for their previous actions. Doping is the act of illegally using drugs or other substances in order to enhance athletic performance. Performance enhancing drugs have long been a problem in sports and local athletes here at Michigan State say the cheat isn’t worth the risk.

Talking with Teachers, Episode 2. Guest: MSU Instructor David Watson

On the second episode of “Talking with Teachers,” I am joined by another Michigan State University employee, College of Arts and Letters faculty member, Dave Watson. Not only does Watson teach at Michigan State, he also has classes at Jackson College and is in a program known as the PEI (Prison Education Initiative), where he teaches inmates at Cooper St. Correctional Facility in Jackson. In the interview Watson talks about how he got into teaching, what his courses can offer and what it’s like teaching in a prison.