Federal court orders big tobacco to tell the truth in new ads

Cigarettes kill 1,200 Americans a day. That’s more people than HIV/AIDS, car crashes and alcohol combined. Michigan State has banned smoking on campus, but the behavior is still common with young people. Now, a new court order might change that. After nearly a decade of court battles, Big Tobacco companies are being forced to pay for ads that tell consumers just how deadly their products are.

More pregnant mothers smoking, rates particularly high in rural counties —Chart

Michigan Births by Mothers Who Smoked During Pregnancy- 2014

County
Rate

Alcona
44.9

Alger
38

Allegan
19.5

Alpena
44.7

Antrim
34

Arenac
36.2

Baraga
46.4

Barry
23.6

Bay
36.6

Benzi
29.7

Berrien
23.8

Branch
26.2

Calhoun
26.1

Cass
34.1

Charlevoix
33.7

Cheboygan
34.5

Chippewa
39.9

Clare
41.9

Clinton
20.3

Crawford
47.7

Delta
37.3

Dickinson
24.8

Eaton
25.5

Emmet
26.5

Genesee
24.2

Gladwin
28.3

Gogebic
37.1

Grand Traverse
25.5

Gratiot
32.5

Hillsdale
34.8

Houghton
21.3

Huron
24.7

Ingham
22.6

Ionia
24.8

Iosco
39.5

Iron
32.4

Isabella
26.6

Jackson
30.7

Kalamazoo
21.4

Kalkaska
41.6

Kent
12.8

Keweenaw
25.5

Lake
39.7

Lapeer
29.9

Leelanau
21.3

Lenawee
23.2

Livingston
22.3

Luce
45.2

Mackinac
35.7

Macomb
19.1

Manistee
37.4

Marquette
30.3

Mason
25.6

Mecosta
31.2

Menominee
37.4

Midland
25.7

Missaukee
25.4

Monroe
26.6

Montcalm
26.3

Montmorency
36.8

Muskegon
33.2

Newaygo
30.5

Oakland
14

Oceana
28.5

Ogemaw
39.1

Ontonagon
34.4

Osceola
33.3

Oscoda
34.4

Otsego
33.7

Ottawa
11.2

Presque Isle
38

Roscommon
46.9

Saginaw
32.5

Saint Clair
30.9

Saint Joseph
27.8

Sanilac
26.3

Schoolcraft
42.9

Shiawasee
34.4

Tuscola
32.9

Van Buren
21.6

Washtenaw
18.2

Wayne
18.9

Wexford
33.8

More pregnant mothers smoking, rates particularly high in rural counties

By BRIDGET BUSH
Capital News Service
LANSING– Limited educational resources for smoking prevention and cessation, combined with limitless high-risk addictive substances caused a spurt in women who smoke during pregnancy, policy experts and educators say. Babies of smokers are at an increased risk of malnourishment, preterm birth, asthma, childhood obesity and sudden death, according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. “More mothers smoking during pregnancy means more babies are being born with lifelong complications,” said Alicia Guevara-Warren, Kids Count project director at the Michigan League for Public Policy. The number of births to women who smoked while pregnant skyrocketed 18 percent from 2008 to 2014, according to a recent report by the league. That means that 21.4 percent of all live births in Michigan are to mothers who smoked during pregnancy, the 27th-highest rate in the country.

Group pushes repeal of restaurant smoking ban

By JASMINE WATTS
Capital News Service
LANSING—A group of Michigan residents and businesses is pushing to repeal a state law forbidding smoking in restaurants. Nearly 90 percent of Michigan residents in an online poll want to allow business owners to decide if they want to allow smoking, according to the group that is pushing to repeal the 2010 prohibition on smoking in restaurants, bars and veteran halls, including outdoor eating areas. Ban the Ban Michigan recently polled about 40,000 residents about the issue, said Sheri Woody, a representative of the group. Ban the Ban Michigan has more than 5,000 volunteers who oppose the smoking ban, Woody said. The group has proposed that owners of private businesses be allowed to decide whether to allow smoking in outdoor areas on their property and indoor areas for people ages 21 and up.

Electronic cigarette trend reaches Grand Ledge High School

By Rachael Daniel
Living in the Ledge Staff Reporter

Alternative forms of tobacco such as electronic cigarettes or “e-cigs” and also herbal vaporizer pens have become increasingly popular among smokers as a way to step away from the traditional cigarette, but according to senior Taylor McCrackin, the revolution has made its way to Grand Ledge High School. According to McCrackin from MigVapor, students are not just using them outside and around the school, but e-cigarettes are making appearances inside the classroom as well. “I’ve definitely seen people in class smoking. It’s not frequent, but I’ve seen it,” McCrackin said. Senior Deb VanDeVusse has first-hand experience with the issue.

Fines for tobacco sales to minors could increase

By YUEHAN LIU
Capital News Service
LANSING—The penalties for selling or furnishing tobacco products to minors would increase if the House passes a bill approved by the Senate. Under the bill introduced by Sen. Steve Bieda, D-Warren, violators would face a fine of up to $100 for a first offense and up to $500 for a second offense. Currently, the fine is only up to $50 each time. Bieda said the main concern is people who sell or furnish tobacco products to minors repeatedly. The bill would also require retailers to post signs warning that it’s illegal to provide tobacco to minors and that minors who illegally buy tobacco face criminal penalties.

Spartans Plan to Go Tobacco Free


It may soon be time for Michigan State University smokers to put out their cigarettes, at least while on school property. For some

Michigan State students this is cause for celebration. Senior Marie Steinbock says her commute to class is sometimes hampered by smokers who gather outside building doors. “I would just really love to be able to walk around campus and not have anyone smoking or anyone chewing tobacco or anything like that,” she says. MSU is forming a task force to help transition the University to a tobacco free campus. While it is still in the very early stages of development the according to Jason Cody, a task for member and Communications manager for Michigan State the force will work to guide the campus towards being tobacco free.

Smoke Shop Ban

Hanging in the local Hookah lounges Blue Midnight and Six Lounge, has become somewhat of a past time for students and city residents in East Lansing but after much review and debate City Council has voted in favor of a new law that will ban future smoke shops from opening their business in the city. Focal Point’s Cortni Moore brings you the story. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xK92nie22NY&feature=youtu.be

Prohibiting smoking in the parks

By Tiara Marocco
Bath-DeWitt Connection Staff Writer

BATH, Mich. – In Bath Township’s efforts to provide a cleaner environment for its citizens, the board passed the first reading of the proposed ordinance amendment to prohibit smoking in the parks. On Monday, October 1, 2012, the board debated on the importance of banning smoking in the parks.  The first reading passed with four votes in favor of the ordinance while three opposed. “The No Smoking Ordinance will become effective November 21, 2012 and will be enforced by our police department on a complaint-basis only,” said Kathleen McQueen, Bath Township Clerk. To support or not to support?