Williamston’s 304 River Edge Lofts has 17 apartments ready for lease

It’s not hard to find 304 River Edge Lofts while strolling through downtown Williamston. The four-story brick building stands out in the mix of old-fashioned buildings because of its newness and modern aesthetic. The apartment complex was built last summer and opened in October 2017. With 30 apartments, 17 are sitting empty. With one-bedroom floor plans for $1,250 a month and two-bedroom floor plans for $1,510 a month, property manager Katelyn Franklin said this has some residents concerned.

MDOT proposal receives mixed reviews from Bath Township

The Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) presented a plan during the Bath Township Board of Trustees meeting on Feb. 20 to reconstruct the intersection on Business Loop I-69 and Marsh Road, aiming to make it safer and more efficient. The state-funded plan is to transform the current intersection into a J-turn format, with a pedestrian crossing to allow for non-motorized access through the intersection, which would restrict northbound vehicle traffic up Marsh Road short of the neighborhood past the intersection. It also has federal funding from the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program to help reduce traffic build-up and improve air quality with less idling at the stop lights. However, the plan has been met with mixed reviews from township residents and board members.

Building permit request approved by Planning Commission

By Katie McCoy
Entirely East Lansing

EAST LANSING – Pablo Majano, planning and zoning community development analyst, requested approval to have the ability to apply for a building permit for Michigan State University Federal Credit Union’s headquarters and other zoning districts to build solar panels on carports at the Planning Commission meeting last Wednesday.  

There are no permits in play but this approval would allow business districts and community retail districts to request building permits for solar panel construction, according to Majano. At the planning commission meeting, Majano said this ordinance is based off another ordinance that allows for solar energy systems to be built carports with appropriate permits

Majano said Ordinance 1357 has been an existing regulation on alternative energy generation systems since 2011. “There are no current proposals for a carport energy system,” said Majano.  “Staff of the planning and zoning committee anticipates a future use of carport energy systems in the two different districts.”

Located on a zoning map of East Lansing, the districts requesting the building permits are located in the northern tier of East Lansing.

Vacant building in heart of downtown St. Johns finally being discussed

By Nathaniel Bott
Clinton County Chatter Staff Reporter

ST. JOHNS — What to do with the vacant space at 116 and 118 N. Clinton Avenue was a major point of discussion for the St. Johns City Commission at its regular March 28 meeting. The building, which was a former furniture and mattress liquidators store, has been vacant for some time, and the planning commission began to take matters into their own hands. The planning commission recommended the the city commission approve a petition for special land use allowing residential units to be constructed on the second and third floors of the building.

The request to rezone preserved land withdrawn by the Planning Commission

By Kelsey Banas
The Meridian Times

The Planning Commission motioned to withdraw the rezoning of land request first initiated in Meridian Township at the meeting on Aug. 11. The requested rezone of township-owned land is approximately 16 acres from C-2, commercial, to RR, rural residential, located on the east side of Saginaw Highway between Lake Lansing and Newton roads. The Planning Commission initiated a rezoning of some of one of the Township properties, which is a land preserve. The commission held a public hearing where the Land Preservation Advisory Board met and discussed the rezoning and was opposed to it.

Planning Commission approves Master Plan

By Micaela Colonna
Mason Times staff writer

For three years, the Mason Planning Commission has been updating its 2004 Master Plan. On Tuesday, Feb. 11, city commissioners passed the resolution and sent it to City Council for consideration. The intent of Mason’s updated Master Plan is to create a vision and set policy for growth. Looking to direct new commercial, residential and industrial development, the plan hopes to guarantee appropriate land use, bring awareness to the city’s agricultural practices, reduce tax burdens on citizens and preserve its historical and small-town character.