Feeling the squeeze-more Manhattan natives moving to NYC’s boroughs

NEW YORK — As more people move into a city, population, housing and overall living expenses seem to go one way—up. Manhattan is no different. People move in, prices increase, and those who have lived in a neighborhood their entire life may find that they can no longer afford it, said Nicole Gelinas a Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute, a local based think tank, and an expert in state and local fiscal policy, along with public transportation and infrastructure. The cost of living has changed significantly over several different time periods, and for different reasons she said. “Since the financial crisis, so we’ll say since 2008, the sales market has certainly increased markedly in prices,” Gelinas said.

Students sign leases for next school year

EAST LANSING, Mich.- It’s only six weeks into the fall semester at Michigan State University, but students are already looking into housing options for next year. Freshmen who just arrived on campus have settled into things and are making new friends. However, they now have to decide where they want to live for next year, who they want to live with and it has to be done fast. If not, all the houses and apartments will be leased. “It is a little bit of pressure to have to choose so early in the year when you don’t know what you’re going to take next year and who your friends are going to be,” MSU freshman Sarah Presley said. 

Presley wants to live with someone who doesn’t attend MSU, her friend goes to community college back home but will transfer next year.

Live comfortably, or affordably? College students have to choose

Over the last few years East Lansing, Mich. has seen a drastic increase of apartment complexes. Prior to before there are more options than ever, for East Lansing residents. More and more these apartment are coming with amenities that will have college students at Michigan State University living better than some working adults. Apartment companies like SkyVue , DTN, and Hannah Lofts just to name a few are dominating the millennial housing market in the area.

Housing plan stalled; future uncertain

By Nakea Paige
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

The city of Lansing is at odds with a proposed new housing development project that will create affordable housing for some families. Over the past two years, there has been a building, located at 1113 N. Washington Ave, that has been waiting to be turned in to a new low-income housing development. There has been a standstill because of the fact that council members feel that there might be some discrimination within the regulations for this housing project. The head of the project, Dr. Sam Saboury, has been trying to find ways to get the project underway. In March, the Lansing City Council rejected Saboury’s request for a 4 percent Payment in Lieu of Taxes, or PILOT, which would have enhanced the prospect of securing the tax credit and being able to start the development.

New apartments to be built on Grand River Avenue

By Riley James
The Meridian Times Staff Reporter

No later than this spring, Campus Village developers plan to build a new apartment complex on Grand River Avenue in Meridian Township. The actual address where the new complex will be built is 2655 Grand River Ave. According to Greg Schaefer, vice president of operations, the apartments should be available in August of 2017. “We decided to propose this development because we felt there was a need in the market for more housing along the Grand River corridor. With the proposed BRT system along Grand River [Avenue] we feel this is an excellent time to increase density along the corridor by incorporating a mixed-use design with some of the existing retail.

Holt looking to define downtown identity through 'Realize Cedar' study

By Austin Short
Holt Journal Staff Reporter

Delhi Charter Township has started an initiative called Realize Cedar and they are looking towards its residents for new ideas on how to improve Holt’s downtown area, specifically the triangle of Cedar Street, Holt Road and Aurelius Road. The study has three ways people can give input; offer a big idea, prioritize goals, and answer poll questions. The former allows people to write the township. Prioritize goals lets residents of the area tell the township what is most important to them. Finally ,the poll lets citizens vote and see the results of important considerations such as retail, bike paths, larger sidewalks and restaurants.

Is a gentrifying Old Town a good thing?

By Cynthia Lee
Old Town Lansing Times Staff Reporter

When first entering Old Town, at first it can be considered an inviting neighborhood. After touring an area filled with booming businesses, clean streets, upscale townhouses you reach the end of the street, and it all comes to a screeching halt entering the poverty-stricken area of Lansing. With newly high-end homes right next door to old low-income housing, Old Town is a prime example of gentrification. But is that a bad thing? Lansing resident William Blanchard doesn’t think it is.