COVID-19 is causing chaos in grocery stores

It’s like the holiday rush, shoppers in a frenzy. 

COVID-19 has created chaos all over the world, including a place you might not expect: grocery stores. Shoppers have been scrambling to buy whatever is left, but there isn’t much. “I’m here ‘til like 10 and I don’t see it slowing down that much,” Meijer employee Dylan S. said. But the hot commodity isn’t a run on turkeys, it’s toilet paper. “Every store you go to, it seems like everyone’s bought toilet paper,” Jean Schlicklin said.  “They’re trying to restock them, but they can’t get them restocked quick enough.”

Toilet paper isn’t the only thing people have stocked up on.

Williamston High School fights the vaping epidemic

Michigan made history as the first state to move toward a flavored nicotine vaping ban on Sept. 4, with other states like New York, Massachusetts and Oregon following shortly after. 

With an increase in vape-related deaths being reported across the nation, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D) with the help of her Chief Medical Executive Dr. Joneigh Khaldun concluded that underage vaping constitutes as a public health emergency. 

Under Whitmer’s orders, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services issued rules detailing the ban, including the prohibition of flavored nicotine products in stores and online and misleading marketing strategies claiming the products are “safe.” Whitmer also ordered the Michigan Department of Transportation to outlaw vape advertisements on state billboards. 

Timeline of the 2019 Michigan vape ban. Graphic by Claire Heise. “As a governor, my No. 1 priority is keeping our kids safe,” said Whitmer in a statement on Sept.

Meridian Township helps those in need

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 12 percent of Meridian Township residents are living below the poverty level. For those who are struggling, Meridian Township has many resources and programs for families in need. One is Meridian Cares. Darla Jackson is a human services specialist for the Meridian Cares program. Jackson helps families with finding shelter, covering utilities, rent to avoid eviction and even help with medications and furniture.

The cost of knowing: is it too much to get tested for STDs?

Many people are not a big fan of tests, especially tests that deal with letting you know if you have a sexually transmitted disease or not. Although it is imperative to your status, it can be pricey. At The Macomb County Medical Clinic in Metro Detroit prices can be around $150, per test. The the cost also depends on how many you getting, as well medical insurance provider. Cameron James recently got his second STD test for the year, which costed the 23-year-old $500 to get tested for all STDs.

Sexual violence on college campuses

The number of sex crimes reported on U.S. college campuses increased by 50 percent over the last decade, according to the latest Indicators of School Crime and Safety survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Justice. While sexual violence is difficult to measure, factors such as grade level, gender and rates of campus crime reporting can help determine the prevalence of sexual violence.

Lake fish, even with some mercury, good for your health

By ERIC FREEDMAN
Capital News Service
LANSING — Eating Great Lakes fish that contain mercury may threaten your health, but the nutritional benefits may outweigh the risks, according to a new study of lake trout and lake whitefish consumption by members of Native American tribes with high rates of obesity, diabetes and other diseases. “Great Lakes fish should be considered for their nutritional importance relative to contemporary options, even when adjusting for risks of mercury toxicity,” according to the researchers from the Chippewa Ottawa Resource Authority’s Inter-Tribal Fisheries and Assessment Program in Sault Ste. Marie and the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. The findings come from the assessment program’s 25 years of studies of whitefish and lake trout from lakes Huron, Superior and Michigan. Authority members come from five Ottawa and Ojibwa tribes — known collectively as the Anishinaabe– in the Upper Peninsula and Northern Lower Peninsula and represent fisheries’ interests.

Bath’s parks benefit the community in more ways than one

By Holly Osmer
Bath-DeWitt Connection Staff Reporter

BATH — Access to public parks can have positive attributes to communities, no matter the size. According to an article published by The Trust for Public Land, some of these benefits include exposure to nature and greenery which makes people healthier and increased property value. “Research has shown that cities with good parks and recreation services have stronger economic growth so they can attract residents and businesses because they are seen as amenities,” said Director of the Global Urban Studies Program and Professor of Political Science Dr. Laura Reese at Michigan State University. According to Reese, parks can also positively contribute to public health and lowering crime in local communities. “Public events can bring in tourists that shop and eat in the community,” said Director of the Global Urban Studies Program and Professor, Political Science Dr. Laura Reese.

Woman in DeWitt Township arrested for alleged drugged driving

By Cydni Robinson
Clinton County Chatter Staff Reporter

DEWITT — Driving under the influence doesn’t simply mean drunk driving. Prescription drugs can also impair a driver, something a 27-year-old woman allegedly learned the hard way earlier this month. The woman was arrested by DeWitt Township police for operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of drugs after an alleged hit-and-run with a mailbox on March 5, police officials said. Driving under the influence doesn’t only deal with illegal drugs and alcohol, it includes any mood or mind-altering substance, says Diana Julian, substance abuse/program manager and counselor at McAlister Institute. Julian says being aware that driving under the influence involves prescription drug abuse is very important.