MSU playing central role in vaccine distribution in Ingham County

An individual arrives outside the pavilion to check-in to receive their vaccine. Photo by Kayla Richards. By April 13, a little more than 100,000 Ingham County residents, 42.9% of the county’s population, received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine.  

At the heart of Ingham County’s vaccination effort is the Michigan State University Pavilion for Agriculture and Livestock Education, which opened Dec. 21 for vaccinations. MSU works with the Ingham County Health Department, which receives the vaccines from the state, to administer vaccines via drive-through at the pavilion, eight hours a day Tuesday through Friday. 

Lt. Dave Oslund, emergency management unit commander for the MSU Police Department, said the university works with the City of East Lansing and Ingham County’s emergency management unit.

Parents raise concerns about Haslett schools communication on in-person learning

Photo by Jack Harrsion

The timeline and communication by Haslett Public Schools officials offering in-person learning has caused parents to raise questions. The district first offered in-person learning in February. A district survey with 72% participation found that 58.8% of students are enrolled in the in-person hybrid option, while the remainder are entirely virtual. On March 12 Steven Cook, superintendent of Haslett Public Schools, announced the district will increase in-person learning to 20 hours per week by March 22. This came after Gov. Gretchen Whitmer signed House Bill 4048, requiring districts to offer at least 20 hours of in-person instruction to avoid additional funding loss.

CATA managing well after one year of COVID-19

Ingham County had its first reported cases of COVID-19 in March of 2020 and Capital Area Transportation Authority (CATA) reduced routes at Michigan State University from nine to four. The authority navigated reduced revenue and implemented several safety measures.

Ingham County had its first reported cases of COVID-19 in March of 2020 and Capital Area Transportation Authority (CATA) reduced routes at Michigan State University from nine to four. The authority navigated reduced revenue and implemented several safety measures.

CATA also did not charge riders for a portion of time. Robison said CATA did not furlough nor terminate any employees and wages were not reduced.

Gun violence reduction under consideration in Ingham County

A county health department manager provided an overview to several Ingham County commissioners on a proposed partnership with Advance Peace, which seeks to reduce gun violence in urban areas.

Jessica Yorko, manager of the department’s Health Promotion and Prevention Division, said “The crux of this model is that it deliberately involves those at the center of gun violence, shooters and victims, in the approach,” Yorko said. “That is something that sets it aside from some other models that take a more generalized approach in the community.”

Lansing City Council member seeks repeal of police ordinances

A Lansing City Council member proposed repealing ordinances that permit city police to charge residents with misdemeanors punishable with up to 90 days in jail. 

At a Lansing City Council meeting on Feb. 8, Brian Jackson introduced 15 ordinances to repeal that will be discussed by the Council and reviewed by police at upcoming meetings. In a Feb. 4 memorandum, Jackson wrote that police have the discretion to charge residents for simple violations of ordinances, such as loitering near where controlled substances are sold, playing in streets and engaging in boisterous conduct. Why did Jackson introduce the proposal to repeal ordinances? 

Jackson said he considered police reform and because of his background as a public defender.