Detroit’s comeback might leave some residents behind

By CHEYNA ROTH
Capital News Service
LANSING – Persistent poverty and a focus on commercial developments in Detroit are raising concerns that efforts to revitalize the city are ignoring its low-income population. “We don’t talk enough about how Detroiters who grew up in the city and are now in their 20s and 30s are concerned they won’t be able to participate in the revival of the city that made them,” said Aaron Foley, a Detroit writer whose book, “How to Live in Detroit Without Being a Jackass,” published by Rust Belt Chic, is due out this fall. Detroit’s economic and cultural health are tied directly to Michigan’s overall fortunes. Gov. Rick Snyder has said a strong Detroit is central to revitalizing the state. Millions of dollars have been invested in moving the city through bankruptcy and rebuilding parts of the city, such as refurbishing the David Whitney Building into luxury apartments and office space.

HIV rates remain high, report finds

By BECKY McKENDRY
Capital News Service
LANSING – The HIV crisis is far from over in Michigan. Thirteen of Michigan’s 83 counties have high HIV rates as of 2012, according to the most recent Department of Community Health report. They include Ingham, Macomb, Allegan and Oakland. But higher than any county is the city of Detroit, with 778 cases per 100,000 people. Wayne County outside of Detroit ranks as the sixth-highest county.

Children among those losing cash assistance

By JENNIFER CHEN
Capital News Service
LANSING – Many children have lost cash assistance since September due to the 60-month limit set by the Department of Human Services, according to the Michigan League for Human Services. The number of people who lost benefits dropped 30 percent between September 2011 and February 2012. Nearly 66,000 people, including 46,000 children lost benefits, according to the Department of Human Services. Families are allowed to receive assistances for 60 months while job hunting. “A 60-month limit is particularly harsh.

International student population up at some community college

By WEI YU
Capital News Service
LANSING – The number of international students at some community colleges – including those in Grand Rapids, Lansing and Wayne County – is increasing, according to the Michigan Community College Association. South Korea, China and India are the top places of origin for them, and business, health careers and computers are their most popular fields of study. Evan Montague, dean of student services at Lansing Community College (LCC), said the college has a strong international student population with 400 students from 56 countries out of 20,000 in total. To ease their transition to a new environment, the college holds an international orientation. LCC also has an international student services coordinator who assists students in connecting with campus academic support, as well as an international student department and an active international student club.