Technology and sustainability are key focuses for future of Novi

NOVI, Mich.- Approaching its 50th anniversary as a township, Novi has attained the status of being among the fastest growing communities in the state of Michigan. With a population of more than 60,000 as of 2018, Novi is among the 20 most populated cities in Michigan, according to the Michigan Demographics website. With a population that keeps growing, though, as evidenced by how the population has gone up by nearly 5,000 since the 2010 census had it at 55,224, the process of sustaining such a large community is something that presents a much more difficult challenge for city government. “You’re going to need to have multiple actions going on to ensure that the community that is growing is the community that people want,” said Rex LaMore, the director of the MSU Center for Community Economic Development, who has 35 years of experience in the field. “There’s a number of important elements to consider.

Old Town could see the effects of the shift back into the urban core

By Zachary Barnes
Old Town Lansing Times Staff Reporter

Old Town is subject to the population shift of millennials moving back into the urban core, after so many years of sprawl, because of its walkability and number of things to do. “What we seem to be observing is that young millennials seem to have different interests and life style choices,” said Rex LaMore, a member of Michigan State University’s Urban and Regional Planning faculty. “They want to be in interesting places where there are a lot of opportunity and things to do. So they are moving back into central cities.” Old Town offers an array of unique festivals, an assortment of different styles of restaurants, and many niche shops as well as shops for basic necessities.

Fall to see sidewalk improvements for DeWitt

By Skyler Ashley
Bath-DeWitt Connection Staff Reporter

DEWITT — During a meeting on Oct. 13, the DeWitt City Council approved an initiative to improve several sections of sidewalk across town. The six locations marked for improvement were determined to not meet ADA standards, which cities are expected and required to meet under federal law to allow for easy access by the disabled. DeWitt City Administrator Daniel Coss outlined the plan concisely. “The project did get approved, Moffitt was awarded the contract and construction should begin within the next week or so.” Coss said.