Detroit ice cream stores face obstacles amid pandemic, keep moving forward

Courtesy of Zahra Saad of The Custard HutHot Waffle Sandwiches sold by The Custard Hut of Dearborn Heights, Michigan

Zahra Saad was startled by the reactions when she announced the opening of her business, the Custard Hut. “When we opened on April 10, I received multiple death threats, multiple threats on my business and actually had people calling the cops to try to shut me down, but we were allowed to be open,” said Saad. For many people, ice cream is the go-to staple of the summer. But during a global pandemic that limits face-to-face interaction and differing opinions by the public and business owners alike about when the appropriate time is to open a store, the sweet treat has undergone a lot of changes these past few months. Several Detroit ice cream stores were forced to close down because of the shelter in place order that was effective March 24.

Can Trump or Clinton bolster Michigan manufacturing?

Michigan has experienced six years straight of automotive sector growth, according to an analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics data. After plummeting to a 21st century low in 2009, the 2015 rate again marked improvement in employment, with about 122,400 Michigan workers in the field compared to 117,600 the year before. In the Nov. 8 election, both major-party candidates have promised to preserve the boom. When in Michigan, both Republican nominee Donald Trump and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton keyed in on the issue of manufacturing strength as a point of persuasion for undecided voters.

World Trade Center architect’s Detroit vision

By AMANDA PROSCIA
Capital News Service
LANSING — John Gallagher profiles Japanese-American architect Minoru Yamasaki in his new book Yamasaki in Detroit: A Search for Serenity. Best known for his design of the World Trade Center in New York, a number of Yamasaki’s designs adorn Detroit’s urban landscape, including the One Woodward Avenue building (formerly the Michigan Consolidated Gas building). The city was Yamasaki’s adopted home. He moved from New York to a Detroit suburb in his mid-30s and remained in the area until his death in 1986. “The great irony is Yamasaki is known as the architect of arguably the most gargantuan project in the U.S., but mostly all of his other projects were very modest,” Gallagher said.

Detroit’s comeback might leave some residents behind

By CHEYNA ROTH
Capital News Service
LANSING – Persistent poverty and a focus on commercial developments in Detroit are raising concerns that efforts to revitalize the city are ignoring its low-income population. “We don’t talk enough about how Detroiters who grew up in the city and are now in their 20s and 30s are concerned they won’t be able to participate in the revival of the city that made them,” said Aaron Foley, a Detroit writer whose book, “How to Live in Detroit Without Being a Jackass,” published by Rust Belt Chic, is due out this fall. Detroit’s economic and cultural health are tied directly to Michigan’s overall fortunes. Gov. Rick Snyder has said a strong Detroit is central to revitalizing the state. Millions of dollars have been invested in moving the city through bankruptcy and rebuilding parts of the city, such as refurbishing the David Whitney Building into luxury apartments and office space.

Despite Setbacks, Michigan Tourism Remains Pure

By Ian Wendrow
Listen Up, Lansing

LANSING-As news of Wayne County’s financial trouble spreads across Michigan and Detroit continues to pick up the pieces from its historic bankruptcy case, one would be fair in believing that the spirit of travel had fallen in recent years. Looking at basic economic figures, the future for Michigan’s vast tourism industry looked dire even before the recession or the bankruptcy hit. “Things started to bottom out near the end of [Former Governor Jennifer] Granholm’s term,” said David Lorenz, Manager of Industry Relations and International Marketing for the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC). The economic draw-down overall hit Michigan harder than most, since much of the state’s finances derives from manufacturing, specifically cars. “We weren’t diversified well enough, so under our philosophy under the Granholm administration we really started taking this diversification thing seriously,” said Lorenz.

Haslett High School awarded $1,800 for broadcast equipment

By Cayden Royce
The Meridian Times

The Detroit Sports Broadcasters Association awarded $1,800 to Haslett High School for the broadcast program. DSBA is a nonprofit organization, which promotes sporting activities and educational broadcasting programs around metro Detroit. The nonprofit generates funding from its annual summer golf outing to provide applicants with grants. Nearly 20 years ago, the organization shifted its focus to education and began promoting broadcast curriculums in Southeast Michigan up to East Lansing, said Marketing Director Bill Harrington. Harrington is on the DSBA executive board and said he looks at the grant applications to decide how the funds will be distributed.