Coronavirus cuts final year short for MSU seniors

Seniors at Michigan State University are coping with having
their final year cut short. The spread of the Coronavirus has caused universities across
the nation to switch to online teaching for the remainder of the semester. Kelsey Nickerson, a senior at MSU said it was so abrupt. “I was so confused for like a second I was happy and
then I was like I don’t know if I’m ever going back to class,” Nickerson
said. Campus looks like a ghost town as many students have packed
up their things and returned to their permanent homes.

‘It was so sad’: How coronavirus pandemic impacts students studying abroad

“The whole reason why I went to MSU was solely based on the Korean program.” 

Yvonne Phillips felt lucky. She was one of four students accepted to a study abroad program in South Korea. She planned to finish her undergraduate minor in Korean. 

Phillips couldn’t take enough pictures or videos during her first week in Korea. She figured it was going to be a great 4 months. And then…

“It was so sad,” said Phillips.

COVID-19 is causing chaos in grocery stores

It’s like the holiday rush, shoppers in a frenzy. 

COVID-19 has created chaos all over the world, including a place you might not expect: grocery stores. Shoppers have been scrambling to buy whatever is left, but there isn’t much. “I’m here ‘til like 10 and I don’t see it slowing down that much,” Meijer employee Dylan S. said. But the hot commodity isn’t a run on turkeys, it’s toilet paper. “Every store you go to, it seems like everyone’s bought toilet paper,” Jean Schlicklin said.  “They’re trying to restock them, but they can’t get them restocked quick enough.”

Toilet paper isn’t the only thing people have stocked up on.

20th Annual Mid-Michigan Women’s Expo

The 20th annual Mid-Michigan Women’s Expo was a celebration of women, entrepreneurs and bringing people together. There were over 300 businesses with products catered to women, including healthy eating. One of the businesses at the event was Vitamix, a company that manufactures blenders for restaurants and every day consumers. Every booth at the event showcased their products, ranging from cakes, hair styling tools and jewelry, but Vitamix promoted something bigger. 

“Love hearing stories about how we changed people’s lives, that they’ve gotten healthier, they’ve beat their healthy obstacles etc.,” said Nancy Spruiell, a Vitamix demonstrator. Spruiell said the blender also helps parents get their kids to eat fruits and vegetables. 

“Raising healthier kids, that’s a huge thing these days, especially with the way they make our food these days,” Spruiell said.