12/6/19 CNS Budget

To: CNS Editors

From: David Poulson and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841; cepak@msu.edu. For other matters, contact Dave Poulson at (517) 432-5417 or (517) 899-1640; poulson@msu.edu. Editors: This is our last weekly file of the semester. Next Friday, Dec. 13, we will move our traditional end-of-semester bonus week package of still-timely stories you may not have had space for earlier.

Michigan farmers struggle to stay afloat

Michigan’s farm economy and exports are suffering due to a perfect storm of adverse factors, including bad weather and trade conflicts with China, Mexico and Canada. Dairy and soybean farmers are especially hard hit. We talk to Farm Bureau experts and a Sanilac County farmer. For news, business and agriculture sections. By Katrianna Ray.

Export controls, U.S.-China trade relationship, affect Michigan technology goods

Michigan high-tech exports — which make up 1.1% of the U.S. total— may be subject to government controls partly due to international trade conflicts with the state’s third-biggest export market, China. Congress passed the Export Control Reform Act last year to regulate the transfer of specified technologies, information and services from the U.S., including artificial intelligence and machine learning technology, robotics, advanced computing technology and advanced surveillance technologies. A U-M economist and a Lansing trade lawyer explain. For business and news sections. By Mila Murray.

More beach litter means fewer tourists

More litter means fewer Great Lakes tourists, according to a recent federal study. And that means less jobs and less money for the local economy. The study found that doubling the litter along Lake Erie would discourage more than a third of visitors from coming back. By Indri Mauladar.

Michigan communities fail to benefit from recession recovery

A new report quantifies how much cities failed to recover from the recession even while Michigan’s economy improved. From 2002 to 2017, Michigan cities lost 12% in total revenue, 37% in state revenue sharing and 15-percent in property taxes, according to the Michigan Municipal League. We talk to officials in Marquette, the league and a Michigan State University economist.

11/27/19 CNS Budget

To: CNS Editors

From: David Poulson and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841; cepak@msu.edu. For other matters, contact Dave Poulson at (517) 432-5417 or (517) 899-1640; poulson@msu.edu. Here is your file:

BITTER HARVEST: What do sick Chinese pigs, a rainy spring, limits on ethanol production and tariff wars have in common? Each are part of the recipe for what experts say is shaping up as Michigan’s worst year ever for agriculture. By Evan Jones.

For one butterfly, Michigan may be its last, best hope

Going! Going! Soon gone? That may be the plight of the endangered, awkwardly named Poweshiek skipperling butterfly, now known to survive in the wild in only two places on earth, Oakland County and Manitoba. A new study estimates that only 231 adults survive in Michigan, all in three prairie fens – a type of biologically diverse wetland community – and the “last remaining stronghold” for the species in the world. A Central Michigan University plant biologist and a Minnesota Zoo butterfly conservation biologist explain the crisis and an effort to rebuild the populations. By Eric Freedman.

Some Michigan universities earn very sustainable label

Three Michigan universities were recently ranked among the U.S. and Canada’s greenest colleges by two organizations. The Princeton Review listed Michigan State University (19th) and Grand Valley State University (38th) among its top 50. The Sierra Club ranked Grand Valley State University (59th), Michigan State University (66th) and the University of Michigan (71st) among its top 100. By Helen Korneffel.