July 2015 Budget

Capital News Service Budget – July 20, 2015

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman & Dave Poulson

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/. For technical problems, contact CNS tech manager Tanya Voloshina (248-943-8979) voloshin@msu.edu.

You can email us at cnsmsu@gmail.com

CNS WEBSITE: We are close to resolving problems with the CNS website (and other Journalism School news websites) with our switch to a new server and will try to upload these stories and photos. To be on the safe side, however, we are attaching the budget, stories and visuals for this file to this email. We apologize for the inconvenience. Please let us know (freedma5@msu.edu and poulson@msu.edu) if you have any questions.

2nd SUMMER ENVIRONMENTAL FILE: This is the 2nd of three planned summer files of Michigan environmental stories in collaboration with Great Lakes Echo, the Journalism School’s environmental news service. Of course, CNS subscribing news organizations are free to continue using any of our other archived stories and visuals. The next will come in mid-August.

WOLF STORIES: The two parts of our arsonist-to-wolf-protection-activist package can be run together or as separate stories.
HERE’S YOUR FILE:

BIRCHBARKCANOES: The tradition of the birch bark canoe remains alive, thanks to the efforts of Native American artisans such as a member of the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians in Sault Ste. Marie. His instructional booklet includes pictures from a workshop with the Little River Band of Odawa Indians in Manistee. A member of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi who grew up in Southwest Michigan, explains the canoe’s historical role in the region. By Holly Drankhan. FOR BAY MILLS, SAULT STE. MARIE, MARQUETTE, STURGIS, THREE RIVERS, ST. IGNACE, CHEBOYGAN, TRAVERSE CITY, PETOSKEY, MANISTEE, LUDINGTON & ALL POINTS.
w/BIRCHBARKCANOESPHOTO1: Tom Byers uses spruce roots to lash together two sides of a birch bark canoe. Credit: Tom Byers.
w/BIRCHBARKCANOESPHOTO2: Curved ribs made of white cedar are added to the full length of the canoe to provide support and shape. Credit: Eric Mase.

GOBYGUTS: Few creatures can survive being chewed up and pooped out by the invasive round goby – but Great Lakes ostracods, or seed shrimp, can. That’s important because if non-native and invasive prey survive being eaten by gobies, they could be spread as far as the fish swim. We hear from a DNR fisheries biologist, as well as researchers studying the situation. By Mollie Liskiewicz. FOR LUDIGNTON, MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, SAULT STE. MARIE, ALCONA, CHEBOYGAN, TRAVERSE CITY, HOLLAND, MANISTEE, TRAVERSE CITY, HARBOR SPRINGS, LEELANAU & ALL POINTS.
w/GOBYGUTSPHOTO: Round goby are invasive to the Great Lakes. Credit: Flikr

WOLFACTIVISTPART1: Rod Coronado, now of Grand Rapids, drew national attention–and a two-year manhunt–after torching MSU research labs. Now out of prison, he’s a vocal wolf protection activist. The first part of this two-story package focuses on his transition from arsonist to non-violent animal rights activist. By Holly Drankhan. FOR BAY MILLS, CADILLAC, LUDINGTON, CHEBOYGAN, CRAWFORD COUNTY, GLADWIN, ALCONA, BAY MILLS, GREENVILLE, MARQUETTE, ST. IGNACE, SAULT STE. MARIE, MANISTEE, BIG RAPIDS, HOLLAND, LEELANAU, TRAVERSE CITY & ALL POINTS.
w/WOLFACTIVISTPHOTO: After spending six years in prison for violent animal rights activism, Rod Coronado now protests about public policies on recreational wolf hunting. Credit: Joe Brown

WOLFACTIVISTPART2: Convicted arsonist Rod Coronado has founded Great Lakes Wolf Patrol, a group that opposes wolf hunting in Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota, as well as Montana. We look at the group’s activities and talk to the U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance and a filmmaker who is making a documentary about Coronado’s organization. By Holly Drankhan. FOR BAY MILLS, CADILLAC, LUDINGTON, CHEBOYGAN, CRAWFORD COUNTY, GLADWIN, ALCONA, BAY MILLS, GREENVILLE, MARQUETTE, ST. IGNACE, SAULT STE. MARIE, MANISTEE, BIG RAPIDS, HOLLAND, LEELANAU, TRAVERSE CITY & ALL POINTS.
CNS

Meet the goby guts survivors

By MOLLIE LISKIEWICZ

Capital News Service

LANSING – Not many of the Earth’s creatures can say that they’ve survived being chewed up and pooped out – but the ostracods of the Great Lakes can.

Ostracods – also known as seed shrimp – can survive getting eaten by the round goby, an invasive fish that comes from central Eurasia, according to a recent study.

detroitriverfront

Round goby are invasive to the Great Lakes. Image: Flickr.


The study, published in the “Journal of Great Lakes Research,” suggests that the round goby can eat small freshwater mussels, but are less well-adapted to feeding on other hard-bodied prey such as ostracods. In the study, 16.6 percent of the ostracods eaten by gobies were found alive after they were excreted.
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Birch bark canoe artists keep Native American tradition afloat

HOLLY DRANKHAN

Capital News Service

LANSING — When Tom Byers first laid eyes on a birch bark canoe, it wasn’t what he saw that captivated him most.
It was what he heard.

“I hesitate to say the canoe spoke to me, but that’s what happened,” said Byers of Whitefish, Ontario, who has built 74 of the vessels. “It was almost as if there was a spirit that was communicating telepathically with me from this birch bark canoe that I saw. It was really a powerful experience for me.”

detroitriverfront

Tom Byers uses spruce root to lash together two sides of a birch bark canoe. Image: Courtesy Tom Byers


Byers, a descendant of the Canadian aboriginal group Métis, is part of a movement to revive a craft once key to traveling the Great Lakes region.
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Dawn of the Great Lakes Wolf Patrol

Editors note: This is the second of a two-part story about Rod Coronado, a convicted eco-terrorist now working to protect wolves in the Great Lakes region.

By HOLLY DRANKHAN
Capital News Service

LANSING — One of the Great Lakes Wolf Patrol’s first actions after it was established in 2013 was photographing a wolf killed in Michigan and posting the pictures on its website to inspire others to take up the cause.

The group has since established chapters in Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota. Founder Rod Coronado of Grand Rapids also organized a patrol in Montana to oppose hunting wolves as they leave the protection of Yellowstone National Park. In each location, the group sticks to public lands and roads, and avoids infringing on hunters under the guidelines of hunter harassment laws, Coronado said.
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Convicted eco-terrorist pursues legal protection of Great Lakes wolves

Editor’s note: This is the first of a two-part story about the evolution of an animal activist now working in the Great Lakes region.

By HOLLY DRANKHAN

Capital News Service

LANSING — In the past three decades, Rod Coronado says he’s gone from an eco-terrorist on the FBI’s most wanted list to a law-abiding advocate for the protection of gray wolves in the Great Lakes region.

Now living in Grand Rapids, Coronado’s past includes destroying whaling vessels in Iceland, torching a Michigan State University research lab and demonstrating how to assemble bombs at a public rally.

His extreme activism began at age 19 when he joined the Sea Shepard Conservation Society, an international marine wildlife conservation group. As part of that group, Coronado helped sabotage a whaling station in Reykjavik, Iceland, destroying computers, generators and refrigerators and sinking two whaling vessels.

detroitriverfront

After spending six years in jail for his radical activism, Rod Coronado is legally protesting public policies on recreational wolf hunting. Image: Joe Brown


Although Coronado and his accomplices admitted responsibility for the acts, none were charged and the statute of limitations has since passed.
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June 2015 Budget

Capital News Service Budget – June 18, 2015

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman & Dave Poulson

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/. For technical problems, contact CNS tech manager Tanya Voloshina (248-943-8979) voloshin@msu.edu.

You can email us at cnsmsu@gmail.com

CNS WEBSITE: Due to problems with the CNS website (and other Journalism School news websites), we are switching servers. Until the website is operational again, we are attaching the budget, stories and visuals for this file to this email. We apologize for the inconvenience. Please let us know (freedma5@msu.edu and poulson@msu.edu) if you have any questions.

1st SUMMER ENVIRONMENTAL FILE: This is the 1st of three planned summer files of Michigan environmental stories in collaboration with Great Lakes Echo, the Journalism School’s environmental news service. Of course, CNS subscribing news organizations are free to continue using any of our other archived stories and visuals.

HERE’S YOUR FILE:

COUGARHABITAT: Call it a potential comeback. Habitat is suitable for cougars to recolonize the Upper Great Lakes region, especially in the U.P. and eventually the Northern Lower Peninsula, say Michigan Technologic researchers. An increasing cougar population in the West is pushing the wild cats to expand eastward. We also hear from the DNR and Michigan Wildlife Conservancy. By Logan Clark. FOR MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, SAULT STE. MARIE, ST. IGNACE, CHEBOYGAN, TRAVERSE CITY, ALPENA, MONTMORENCY, LEELANAU, LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, CADILLAC, CRAWFORD COUNTY, GLADWIN, HARBOR SPRINGS & ALL POINTS.

w/COUGARHABITATMAP: Study found best potential places for cougars to live. Credit: Habitat Capacity for Cougar Recolonization in the Upper Great Lakes Region, Michigan Technological University

TRAINROUTES: Transportation organizations are studying the feasibility four possible new passenger train routes that could benefit commuters and vacation travelers, provide environmental advantages and provide an economic boost to Michigan. They are a Howell-Ann Arbor commuter route, a Detroit-Ann Arbor commuter route, and longer Ann Arbor-Traverse City and Detroit-Lansing-Grand Rapids-Holland routes. We hear from the Michigan Environmental Council, Southeast Michigan Council of Governments, Ann Arbor Area Transportation Authority and Michigan Land Use Institute. By Colleen Otte. FOR HOLLAND, TRAVERSE CITY, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, LANSING CITY PULSE, CADILLAC, PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS & ALL POINTS.

w/TRAINROUTESMAP: Proposed passenger train routes in the Northern Lower Peninsula. Credit: Michigan Land Use Institute.

EARTHWORMINVADERS: The last Ice Age wiped out earthworms in the Great Lakes region. Now, after composting and fishing reintroduced them to the region, they’re wreaking havoc on northern forest soil nutrients, contributing to algal blooms, smaller trilliums and shrinking hummingbird populations. We talk about the implications with experts from Michigan Tech, U.S. Forest Service and University of Michigan. By Chris Symons. FOR CADILLAC, CHEBOYGAN, CRAWFORD COUNTY, GLADWIN, MONTMORENCY, ALCONA, MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, SAULT STE. MARIE, PETOSKEY, BIG RAPIDS, LUDINGTON, HOLLAND, LEELANAU, GREENVILLE, LAKE COUNTY, HERALD STAR & ALL POINTS.

ARTIFICIALREEFS: Artificial reefs in all five Great Lakes and some tributaries are intended to improve sport-fishing, enhance fish habitats and reduce the impact of current and waves. But it’s uncertain whether they’ve been as successful as hoped in achieving those goals, according to the U.S. Geological Service’s Great Lakes Science Center in Ann Arbor. Among the reefs cited in their study are ones in the Detroit and St. Clair rivers, near the Cook Nuclear Plant in Bridgman and J.H. Campbell Power Plant in Ludington, Hamilton Reef in Muskegon and ones in Thunder Bay and Port Huron. By Eric Freedman. FOR LUDINGTON, HOLLAND, MANISTEE, TRAVERSE CITY, PETOSKEY, LEELANAU, CHEBOYGAN, HARBOR SPRINGS, ST. IGNACE, BAY MILLS, MARQUETTE, ALCONA, SAULT STE. MARIE & ALL POINTS.

w/ARTIFICIALREEFSDIAGRAM: Diagram of spawning reefs in the Detroit and St. Clair rivers. Credit: Michigan Sea Grant

FARMLANDEASEMENT: A Bankruptcy Court judge has cleared the way for a debtor to sell her Washtenaw County farm property despite a conservation easement owned by a local land conservancy. However, the purchaser must comply with the easement that bans non-farming use of part of the land. Legacy Land Conservancy, which bought the easement in 2003 with U.S. Agriculture Department financial support, unsuccessfully challenged the proposed sale of the property. By Eric Freedman. FOR ALL POINTS.

DETROITREFUGE: What was once considered the ultimate paradox is now setting a precedent for urban development – a Detroit-area wildlife refuge along what was once one of North America’s most polluted rivers.  We talk to the international refuge’s first manager, who has just written a book about the innovative project. By Kevin Duffy. FOR ALL POINTS.

w/DETROITREFUGECOVER: Bringing Conservation to Cities: Lessons from Building the Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Michigan State University Press.

 

CNS

Earthworm Invaders

By CHRIS SYMONS

Capital News Service

LANSING – Compost box heroes, or the root of all ecological evil? Earthworms in Great Lakes forests are not what they seem.

Trilliums are smaller, algal blooms are more common and hummingbird populations are decreasing.

All of these are worsened by non-native earthworms in Great Lakes soil, according to a new study that identified four key minerals that earthworms remove from soil and that native plants need to grow.
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Artificial Reefs

ARTIFICIALREEFS

By ERIC FREEDMAN

Capital News Service

LANSING — Artificial reefs in all five Great Lakes and some of their tributaries are intended to improve sport-fishing, enhance fish habitats and reduce the impact of current and waves.

But it’s uncertain whether they’ve been as successful as hoped in achieving those goals, according to a new study by scientists at the U.S. Geological Service’s Great Lakes Science Center in Ann Arbor.

The problem is a shortage of long-term monitoring data on the region’s expanding number of artificial reefs.
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Detroit Refuge

By KEVIN DUFFY

Capital News Service

LANSING – What was once considered the ultimate paradox is now setting a precedent for urban development – a wildlife refuge along the Detroit River.

“Bringing Conservation to Cities: Lessons from Building the Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge” (Michigan State University Press, $39.95) is a new book about a public-private success story written by inland water scientist John Hartig. It traces the establishment of the country’s first international wildlife refuge.

“The next generation of conservationists will come from urban areas,” said Hartig, who is the refuge’s manager. “An area, like Detroit, with 7 million people in the combined watershed, should be engaging them.”
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Farmland Easement

By ERIC FREEDMAN

Capital News Service

LANSING — A Bankruptcy Court judge in Detroit has cleared the way for a debtor to sell farm property despite a conservation easement owned by a local land conservancy.

However, the purchaser must comply with the easement that bans non-farming use of part of the land and is intended to “protect the property’s natural resource and watershed values; to protect the property’s prime agricultural soils and to maintain and enhance the natural features of the property,” Judge Mark Randon ruled.

In 2003, Legacy Land Conservancy paid Carolyn Strieter $195,000 for a conservation easement on 77 of her 96.6 acres of farmland in Freedom Township near Ann Arbor. Such easements limit how property can be used.
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