August 2015 Environmental Budget

Capital News Service Budget – August 19, 2015

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman & Dave Poulson

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/. For technical problems, contact CNS tech manager Tanya Voloshina (248-943-8979) voloshin@msu.edu.

You can email us at cnsmsu@gmail.com

CNS WEBSITE: The CNS website (and other Journalism School news websites) is back and working, but please let us know if you encounter access problems. We appreciate your patience this summer.

3rd SUMMER ENVIRONMENTAL FILE: This is the last of three summer files of Michigan environmental stories in collaboration with Great Lakes Echo, the Journalism School’s environmental news service. Of course, CNS subscribing news organizations are free to continue using any of our other archived stories and visuals. Our regular weekly files will resume on Friday, Sept. 11.

HERE’S YOUR FILE:
ECOLOGICALDEBT: The nation hit Ecological Deficit Day, thanks in part to states like Michigan that use more resources than they can regenerate. Global Footprint Network and Earth Economics details resource availability and the environmental footprint of all 50 states. That footprint includes the unsustainable practices that broke Michigan’s ecological budget. Michigan is among the top three states for resource abundance. By Kevin Duffy. FOR ALL POINTS.

LAMPREYCONTROL: Can a combination of sex and violence help control the Great Lakes’ entrenched invasive sea lampreys that threat other fish species? We hear about the latest research from experts at MSU and the Great Lakes Fishery Commission. By Kevin Duffy. FOR LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, CHEBOYGAN, PETOSKEY, CADILLAC, HOLLAND, TRAVERSE CITY, ALCONA, MARQUETTE, ST. IGNACE, SAULT STE. MARIE, MONTMORENCY, BAY MILLS & ALL POINTS.
w/LAMPREYCONTROLPHOTO: Sea lamprey from a trap site on the Cheboygan River. Credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

COMPANYTOWNS: A new book by an Escanaba writer chronicles the history and fate of mining, logging and quarrying company towns across the Upper Peninsula. By Eric Freedman.
FOR SAULT STE. MARIE, MARQUETTE, ST. IGNACE, BAY MILLS, CHEBOYGAN & ALL POINTS.
w/COMPANYTOWNSCOVER: Cover of “Company Towns of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula” by Christian Holmes. Credit: History Press.

BOATWASH: A grant from the Department of Environmental Quality and the U.S. Forest Service is paying for an MSU project to combat the state’s worst aquatic invaders, such as Eurasian watermilifoil with mobile lakeside education and free boat washes. The “Clean, Drain, Dry” initiative is underway this summer in 32 inland lakes. By Kevin Duffy. FOR ALL POINTS.

CNS

Book explores mining, logging company towns of the Upper Peninsula

By ERIC FREEDMAN

Capital News Service

LANSING — They were shaped by the mines, forests and quarries of the Upper Peninsula — and by the companies that owned those resources.

They were communities that drew workers to the UP from across the globe in search of jobs and opportunities.
And today they’re largely gone. Some, like Ford River, Nahma and Pequaming, still rate a pinprick on the official Michigan Department of Transportation highway map. Some, like Simmons, Shelldrake and Emerson are nowhere to be found on that map, even with a magnifying glass.

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Photo Credits: History Press

Less than a handful — Sault Ste. Marie, Newberry and Kingsford — have populations large enough to be listed on the map.
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Free boat wash targets Michigan invaders

By KEVIN DUFFY

Capital News Service

LANSING — Michigan State University is fighting the state’s worst aquatic invaders with mobile lakeside education and free boat washes.

A grant from the Department of Environmental Quality and U.S. Forest Service supports the portable project, which has already landed in 32 inland lakes as part of the “Clean, Drain, Dry” initiative.

“Boats and boat trailers are the number one means of lake-to-lake transport for invasive species,” said Sarah Plantrich, a project outreach volunteer.
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Sex and violence may control sea lamprey

By KEVIN DUFFY
Capital News Service

LANSING — For the first time, researchers have combined the smell of death with the lure of sex to better target a parasitic invader that has feasted on Great Lakes fish for decades.

Their target is the sea lamprey, an invasive species that uses its toothy sucker-like mouth to feast on Great Lakes trout, salmon, sturgeon, walleye and whitefish.

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Sea lamprey from a trap site on the Cheboygan River in northern Michigan. Image: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Before lamprey were managed, they cost the Great Lakes 110 million fish annually. The cost of control is about $20 million a year, saving about 100 million fish annually, said Marc Gaden of the Great Lakes Fishery Commission, the agency responsible for managing the sea lamprey.
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Michigan faces ecological debt

By KEVIN DUFFY
Capital News Service

LANSING — The nation hit Ecological Deficit Day recently, thanks in part to states like Michigan that use more resources than they can regenerate.

A report by the California-based Global Footprint Network and the Tacoma, Washington, nonprofit group Earth Economics details resource availability and the environmental footprint of all 50 states. That footprint includes the unsustainable practices that broke Michigan’s ecological budget.

It’s not just the fault of the Great Lakes State. In fact, only 16 states can boast that they use fewer resources than they renew each year.
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July 2015 Budget

Capital News Service Budget – July 20, 2015

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman & Dave Poulson

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/. For technical problems, contact CNS tech manager Tanya Voloshina (248-943-8979) voloshin@msu.edu.

You can email us at cnsmsu@gmail.com

CNS WEBSITE: We are close to resolving problems with the CNS website (and other Journalism School news websites) with our switch to a new server and will try to upload these stories and photos. To be on the safe side, however, we are attaching the budget, stories and visuals for this file to this email. We apologize for the inconvenience. Please let us know (freedma5@msu.edu and poulson@msu.edu) if you have any questions.

2nd SUMMER ENVIRONMENTAL FILE: This is the 2nd of three planned summer files of Michigan environmental stories in collaboration with Great Lakes Echo, the Journalism School’s environmental news service. Of course, CNS subscribing news organizations are free to continue using any of our other archived stories and visuals. The next will come in mid-August.

WOLF STORIES: The two parts of our arsonist-to-wolf-protection-activist package can be run together or as separate stories.
HERE’S YOUR FILE:

BIRCHBARKCANOES: The tradition of the birch bark canoe remains alive, thanks to the efforts of Native American artisans such as a member of the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians in Sault Ste. Marie. His instructional booklet includes pictures from a workshop with the Little River Band of Odawa Indians in Manistee. A member of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi who grew up in Southwest Michigan, explains the canoe’s historical role in the region. By Holly Drankhan. FOR BAY MILLS, SAULT STE. MARIE, MARQUETTE, STURGIS, THREE RIVERS, ST. IGNACE, CHEBOYGAN, TRAVERSE CITY, PETOSKEY, MANISTEE, LUDINGTON & ALL POINTS.
w/BIRCHBARKCANOESPHOTO1: Tom Byers uses spruce roots to lash together two sides of a birch bark canoe. Credit: Tom Byers.
w/BIRCHBARKCANOESPHOTO2: Curved ribs made of white cedar are added to the full length of the canoe to provide support and shape. Credit: Eric Mase.

GOBYGUTS: Few creatures can survive being chewed up and pooped out by the invasive round goby – but Great Lakes ostracods, or seed shrimp, can. That’s important because if non-native and invasive prey survive being eaten by gobies, they could be spread as far as the fish swim. We hear from a DNR fisheries biologist, as well as researchers studying the situation. By Mollie Liskiewicz. FOR LUDIGNTON, MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, SAULT STE. MARIE, ALCONA, CHEBOYGAN, TRAVERSE CITY, HOLLAND, MANISTEE, TRAVERSE CITY, HARBOR SPRINGS, LEELANAU & ALL POINTS.
w/GOBYGUTSPHOTO: Round goby are invasive to the Great Lakes. Credit: Flikr

WOLFACTIVISTPART1: Rod Coronado, now of Grand Rapids, drew national attention–and a two-year manhunt–after torching MSU research labs. Now out of prison, he’s a vocal wolf protection activist. The first part of this two-story package focuses on his transition from arsonist to non-violent animal rights activist. By Holly Drankhan. FOR BAY MILLS, CADILLAC, LUDINGTON, CHEBOYGAN, CRAWFORD COUNTY, GLADWIN, ALCONA, BAY MILLS, GREENVILLE, MARQUETTE, ST. IGNACE, SAULT STE. MARIE, MANISTEE, BIG RAPIDS, HOLLAND, LEELANAU, TRAVERSE CITY & ALL POINTS.
w/WOLFACTIVISTPHOTO: After spending six years in prison for violent animal rights activism, Rod Coronado now protests about public policies on recreational wolf hunting. Credit: Joe Brown

WOLFACTIVISTPART2: Convicted arsonist Rod Coronado has founded Great Lakes Wolf Patrol, a group that opposes wolf hunting in Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota, as well as Montana. We look at the group’s activities and talk to the U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance and a filmmaker who is making a documentary about Coronado’s organization. By Holly Drankhan. FOR BAY MILLS, CADILLAC, LUDINGTON, CHEBOYGAN, CRAWFORD COUNTY, GLADWIN, ALCONA, BAY MILLS, GREENVILLE, MARQUETTE, ST. IGNACE, SAULT STE. MARIE, MANISTEE, BIG RAPIDS, HOLLAND, LEELANAU, TRAVERSE CITY & ALL POINTS.
CNS

Meet the goby guts survivors

By MOLLIE LISKIEWICZ

Capital News Service

LANSING – Not many of the Earth’s creatures can say that they’ve survived being chewed up and pooped out – but the ostracods of the Great Lakes can.

Ostracods – also known as seed shrimp – can survive getting eaten by the round goby, an invasive fish that comes from central Eurasia, according to a recent study.

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Round goby are invasive to the Great Lakes. Image: Flickr.


The study, published in the “Journal of Great Lakes Research,” suggests that the round goby can eat small freshwater mussels, but are less well-adapted to feeding on other hard-bodied prey such as ostracods. In the study, 16.6 percent of the ostracods eaten by gobies were found alive after they were excreted.
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Birch bark canoe artists keep Native American tradition afloat

HOLLY DRANKHAN

Capital News Service

LANSING — When Tom Byers first laid eyes on a birch bark canoe, it wasn’t what he saw that captivated him most.
It was what he heard.

“I hesitate to say the canoe spoke to me, but that’s what happened,” said Byers of Whitefish, Ontario, who has built 74 of the vessels. “It was almost as if there was a spirit that was communicating telepathically with me from this birch bark canoe that I saw. It was really a powerful experience for me.”

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Tom Byers uses spruce root to lash together two sides of a birch bark canoe. Image: Courtesy Tom Byers


Byers, a descendant of the Canadian aboriginal group Métis, is part of a movement to revive a craft once key to traveling the Great Lakes region.
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Dawn of the Great Lakes Wolf Patrol

Editors note: This is the second of a two-part story about Rod Coronado, a convicted eco-terrorist now working to protect wolves in the Great Lakes region.

By HOLLY DRANKHAN
Capital News Service

LANSING — One of the Great Lakes Wolf Patrol’s first actions after it was established in 2013 was photographing a wolf killed in Michigan and posting the pictures on its website to inspire others to take up the cause.

The group has since established chapters in Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota. Founder Rod Coronado of Grand Rapids also organized a patrol in Montana to oppose hunting wolves as they leave the protection of Yellowstone National Park. In each location, the group sticks to public lands and roads, and avoids infringing on hunters under the guidelines of hunter harassment laws, Coronado said.
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Convicted eco-terrorist pursues legal protection of Great Lakes wolves

Editor’s note: This is the first of a two-part story about the evolution of an animal activist now working in the Great Lakes region.

By HOLLY DRANKHAN

Capital News Service

LANSING — In the past three decades, Rod Coronado says he’s gone from an eco-terrorist on the FBI’s most wanted list to a law-abiding advocate for the protection of gray wolves in the Great Lakes region.

Now living in Grand Rapids, Coronado’s past includes destroying whaling vessels in Iceland, torching a Michigan State University research lab and demonstrating how to assemble bombs at a public rally.

His extreme activism began at age 19 when he joined the Sea Shepard Conservation Society, an international marine wildlife conservation group. As part of that group, Coronado helped sabotage a whaling station in Reykjavik, Iceland, destroying computers, generators and refrigerators and sinking two whaling vessels.

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After spending six years in jail for his radical activism, Rod Coronado is legally protesting public policies on recreational wolf hunting. Image: Joe Brown


Although Coronado and his accomplices admitted responsibility for the acts, none were charged and the statute of limitations has since passed.
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