Summer Environmental Budget #1, June 9, 2016

June 9, 2016 — Summer Environmental Budget #1

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman & Dave Poulson

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/.

You can email us at cnsmsu@gmail.com

FIRST SUMMER ENVIRONMENTAL COVERAGE: Through our partnership with Great Lakes Echo, this is the first of three summer packages of Michigan environmental stories. The others will come in early July and early August.

ENVIRONMENTAL PODCASTS:
You may also want to use these two Great Lakes Echo Michigan environmental podcasts by Marie Orttenburger on your website:

“Everyone into the (vernal) pool”:  http://greatlakesecho.org/2016/05/27/local-learning-field-trip-to-the-neighborhood-vernal-pool/

“Turning off the lights to see the sky’s stories”: http://greatlakesecho.org/2016/05/20/turning-off-the-lights-to-see-the-skys-stories/

Here is your file:

FERRYRESEARCH: Tourists traveling on the Emerald Isle ferry between Charlevoix and Beaver Island are riding with groundbreaking cargo this summer, equipment to detect changes in Lake Michigan’s temperature and chemistry courtesy of Central Michigan University. Among the benefits, the temperature data may help recreational and commercial anglers predict fish behavior, By Josh Bender. FOR LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, HOLLAND, OCEANA, PETOSKEY, TRAVERSE CITY, CHEBOYGAN, LEELANAU & ALL POINTS.

w/FERRYRESEARCHPHOTO: Don Uzarski, the director of Central Michigan University’s Institute for Great Lakes Research and its biological station on Beaver Island, collects data aboard the Emerald Isle ferry. Credit: Central Michigan University.

SALMONSPORTFISHING: After a half-century of salmon fishing in the Great Lakes, anglers are on edge because numbers of the prized Chinook – or king – salmon have spiraled downward as numbers of native lake trout and whitefish rebound. The tale began in 1966 when first Coho and then Chinook salmon were brought from the Pacific Northwest to the Great Lakes to eat another nonnative fish, the alewife – had invaded the Great Lakes through canals. By Kevin Duffy. For ALCONA, MARQUETTE, SAULT ST. MARIE, BAY MILLS, LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, OCEANA, TRAVERSE CITY, LEELANAU, HARBOR SPRINGS, PETOSKEY, HOLLAND, CHEBOYGAN & ALL POINTS.

w/SALMONSPORTFISHINGPHOTO: Chinook salmon. Credit: Michigan Sea Grant.

CORMORANTS: Cormorants may be getting a bum rap among Great Lakes anglers who claim the birds are devastating the commercial and sports fishery. The first study of cormorants’ diets in southern Lake Michigan found that they’re eating invasive species such as alewives and round goby — not the prized salmon and trout. Similar results have been found in the Beaver Archipelago of northern Lake Michigan and in Saginaw Bay. By Eric Freedman. FOR ALCONA, CHEBOYGAN, SAULT STE MARIE, LUDINGTON, HOLLAND, MANISTEE, TRAVERSE CITY, PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS, LEELANAU, BAY MILLS, MARQUETTE & ALL POINTS.

w/CORMORANTSPHOTO1: Cormorants at a southern Lake Michigan colony. Credit: Patrick. Madura.

w/CORMORANTSPHOTO2: Collecting pellets at a southern Lake Michigan cormorant colony. Credit: Patrick Madura.

ARTIST: Retired MSU zoologist James Atkinson reveals unseen aquatic life through his art. The ex-MSU professor, now living in St. Clair County, collects microscopic fauna from around Michigan to inspire his paintings and provide insights to the public about the natural world. By Josh Bender. FOR LANSING CITY PULSE & ALL POINTS.

w/ARTISTPHOTO1. Artist James Atkinson prepares to video microscopic organisms. Credit: Josh Bender

w/ARTISTPHOTO2: Chaetogaster is a segmented worm that preys on water fleas and, as depicted here, a flatworm. It’s common in lakes and ponds throughout Michigan, including the Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: James Atkinson

CNS

Retired zoologist reveals unseen life through his art

By JOSH BENDER

Capital News Service

LANSING — James Atkinson’s art draws inspiration from a plethora of microscopic life found in a single drop of pond water.

The St. Clair County artist paints from still images taken from videos of organisms that the retired zoologist shoots through a microscope. Filming the critters began as a way to engage students during his teaching career at Michigan State University.

Painting came toward the end of his 43-year academic career, he said. “I wanted to get people in general to realize how beautiful these creatures are, so I decided to start painting.”

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Artist James Atkinson prepares to video microscopic organisms. Credit: Josh Bender

Capturing microscopic fauna in a way that shows their relationship to the larger environment requires a keen eye that blends scientific and artistic skills, he said.
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Can cormorants help control Great Lakes invaders?

By ERIC FREEDMAN
Capital News Service
LANSING — Double-crested cormorants are the bane of many Great Lakes anglers, devouring prize game fish and damaging the sport and commercial fishery.

At least that’s a widely held belief about these birds — and a generally wrong one, Northern Illinois University researchers say.

Cormorants’ fish-stealing rep may be a bum rap — and the truth is more complex, as the first dietary study of cormorants in southern Lake Michigan shows.

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Cormorants at a southern Lake Michigan colony. Credit: Patrick. Madura.

Even better news: The cormorants are chowing down instead on invasive species — mainly alewife, round goby and white perch — which together accounted for 80 to 90 percent of their diet.

“Because this is the first such study to be completed in southern Lake Michigan, its results will help to inform discussion among local stakeholders and will provide valuable data to other researchers studying cormorant diet in the region,” said lead author Patrick Madura, who led the study as a master’s student.
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Fate of popular sport-fishing tradition at risk

By KEVIN DUFFY

Capital News Service

LANSING — After a half-century of salmon fishing in the Great Lakes, anglers are on edge.

As numbers of native lake trout and whitefish rebound, numbers of the prized Chinook – or king – salmon have spiraled downward.

“It’s about finding a balance between prey fish and predators in this changing food web,” said Randy Claramunt, a fisheries research biologist with the Department of Natural Resources (DNR).

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Chinook salmon. Credit: Michigan Sea Grant.

“We don’t want to have a fish community that’s dominated by non-native species,” he said. “But in some cases it can provide a benefit.”

The rise and fall of salmon in the Great Lakes is a cautionary tale that suggests an ecosystem cannot be restored with single-species thinking. It shows how intricate the interactions are among native and non-native species and how that affects a resource economy.
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Researchers get fresh Great Lakes data from aboard Beaver Island ferry

By JOSH BENDER

Capital News Service

LANSING — Tourists traveling by ferry between northwest Michigan and Lake Michigan’s Beaver Island are riding with groundbreaking cargo this summer.

The Beaver Island Boat Co.’s Emerald Isle is fitted with equipment to detect changes in the temperature and chemistry of Lake Michigan, courtesy of researchers from Central Michigan University’s Institute for Great Lakes Research.

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: Don Uzarski, the director of Central Michigan University’s Institute for Great Lakes Research and its biological station on Beaver Island, collects data aboard the Emerald Isle ferry. Credit: Central Michigan University.

The equipment detects this data in real time aboard the ferry and distributes it via a website operated from the CMU Biological Station on the island, something never done before in northern Lake Michigan, said Dave Schuberg, an outreach coordinator and operations assistant at the station.

The equipment can also be turned on and off remotely from the research station, he said.

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Apr. 29th, 2016 Budget

Capital News Service Budget – Week 14 (LAST FILE OF SPRING SEMESTER)

April 29, 2016

To: CNS Editors

From: Dave Poulson and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/. For technical problems, contact CNS tech manager Tanya Voloshina (248-943-8979) voloshin@msu.edu.

You can email us at cnsmsu@gmail.com

BONUS WEEK AHEAD: This week is our last file of the semester. We will move a bonus file next Friday, May 6, that will contain stories already moved this semester but that you may have missed the first time around.

Here’s your file:

Week 14 budget

INCARCERATEDPARENTS: One in 10 Michigan children have had a parent in jail or prison, the third highest rate in the nation. Experts say that’s a traumatic experience equivalent to domestic abuse and one that puts children at risk of depression and anxiety. We talk to officials with the League for Public Policy and the Department of Corrections, the Wexford County prosecutor and an MSU law professor.  By Joshua Bender. FOR CADILLAC AND ALL POINTS.

MOREL: Maps of last year’s forest fires could lead morel hunters to a greater bounty this year. The state Department of Natural Resources is releasing online maps that may help hunters find the elusive fungi with the help of a cell phone. By Jasmine Watts. FOR PETOSKEY AND TRAVERSE CITY ALL POINTS

w/MORELPHOTO: Morel Mushroom by National Morel Mushroom Festival

JURY: Michigan jurors may soon receive their first raise since 2003, a move that’s part of an effort to get more of them to court. Other measures include offering them Uber rides to get them to the jury box and paying them immediately with debit cards so they don’t have to wait for a check. By Jason Kraft. FOR CHEBOYGAN, CADILLAC AND ALL POINTS.

BEVERAGEDEPOSIT: There’s a new bid to expand the state’s beverage container deposit law to cover water, juice, wine, liquor and other non-carbonated drinks, but prospects for legislative approval are dim. All similar efforts to expand the 40-year-old deposit law have failed. We hear from the lead sponsor, from Kalamazoo, MUCC, the Michigan Recycling Coalition, DEQ and the Michigan Retailers Association. By Eric Freedman. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

FORESTS: Participation in a program encouraging private landowners to plan how to harvest their forests has more than tripled in three years, yielding a substantial increase in forest revenue primarily in northern Michigan and unusual agreement between environmentalists and the forest products industry. By David Poulson. FOR MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, ALCONA, CADILLAC, CHEBOYGAN, CRAWFORD COUNTY, GLADWIN, GRAND RAPIDS, LEELANAU, PETOSKEY, ST. IGNACE, TRAVERSE CITY AND ALL POINTS.

NEONATAL: Babies who are born addicted to drugs are a growing problem in Michigan. Some of  the highest rates for what is called neonatal abstinence syndrome are in northern Michigan where health officials are calling for greater public awareness to fight what results in symptoms of drug withdrawal in infants. By Jasmine Watts. FOR ALCONA, MONTMORENCY, MARQUETTE, GLADWIN, ST. IGNACE, SAULT STE. MARIE AND ALL POINTS

GUESTWORKERS The number of foreign seasonal farm workers coming to Michigan and the challenges they face are rapidly growing. They are coming in under a special kind of temporary visa and competing with other migrant workers for jobs. By Joshua Bender. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, OCEANA AND ALL POINTS.

COLLEGEPREP Some lawmakers want to change the standards for preparing students for college in hopes of raising Michigan’s education rankings. But critics say they are lowering them. By Jasmine Watts. FOR ALL POINTS

 

Senate panel passes bill to replace Common Core standards

By JASMINE WATTS
Capital News Service

LANSING – Some lawmakers want to change the standards for preparing students for college in hopes of raising Michigan’s education rankings.

But critics say they are lowering the standards.

The state now falls under the national Common Core standard where schools work with a state’s four-year public university system to certify that students will not need to take remedial coursework in college. Standards are based on what students must know at each grade level to graduate from high school and college to be career-ready.

Some lawmakers are sponsoring legislation that would end the Common Core standard  and move to a new assessment based on one that Massachusetts used to use.

The  Senate Education Committee recently passed the bill by a 4‐1 vote.
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More addicted babies born, go through withdrawal

By JASMINE WATTS
Capital News Service

LANSING— Babies who are born addicted to drugs are a growing problem in Michigan.

The disorder is called neonatal abstinence syndrome and it affects newborns whose mothers were addicted to opiate drugs while they were pregnant. The baby becomes addicted, along with the mother, to substances such as heroin, oxycodone or methadone.

The babies have symptoms of withdrawal that include excessive crying, seizures, trembling, poor feeding, diarrhea and sleep problems, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. And it’s not just a problem in urban areas.

“The opiate drug epidemic in northern Michigan is hurting babies and tearing families apart,” said John Keller, director of the Alpena/Montmorency Department of Health and Human Services. “We’re seeing it in the growing number of babies going to the neonatal intensive care unit with the symptoms and we’re seeing it in the growing caseloads in the courts and Children’s Protective Services.”
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Looking for morels? Find a burn site

By JASMINE WATTS
Capital News Service

LANSING— Forest fires are devastating one year, but can bring a tasty bounty the next.

In hopes of helping morel hunters, the  Department of Natural Resources (DNR) created an online map that highlights the state’s 2015 wildfires and prescribed burns.

“Morel mushrooms are often found in locations where large fires occurred the previous year,” said Jim Fisher, resource protection manager for the DNR Forest Resources Division. “Each spring we get calls from people who are seeking details on those sites to hunt morels.”

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Morel Mushroom Credit: National Morel Mushroom Festival

So the agency created a tool that lets the fungi finders use their cell phones in the woods to track down likely hunting grounds.
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Proposal would increase juror pay rates

By JASON KRAFT

Capital News Service

LANSING – Michigan jurors would soon receive their first pay increase since 2003 if a bill on compensation passes, a representative said.

Rep. Peter Lucido, R-Shelby Township, introduced a bill last year that would increase juror compensation by  $5 per full day and $2.50 per half day. They currently make $25 for a full day and $12.50 for a half day on the first day, then $40 and $20, respectively, on subsequent days.

“Jurors aren’t even making enough to pay for their parking,” Lucido said. “When you look at the economics of it, it’s just not fair. That’s why people have an attitude toward jury duty.”
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