August 17, 2016 Budget

Aug. 16, 2016– Summer Environmental Budget #2

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman & Dave Poulson

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/.

You can email us at cnsmsu@gmail.com

THIRD SUMMER ENVIRONMENTAL COVERAGE: Through our partnership with Great Lakes Echo, this is our third summer packages of Michigan environmental stories. We will resume our regular weekly feeds in September.

ENVIRONMENTAL PODCASTS:
You may also want to use this Great Lakes Echo Michigan environmental podcast on your website: http://greatlakesecho.org/2016/08/12/solar-powered-brewing.

HERE’S YOUR FILE:

BATZONE: You can step up to the plate at the newly renovated Bat Zone in Bloomfield Hills, North America’s only sanctuary and education center for bats and other nocturnal creatures. It’s run by the Organization for Bat Conservation at the Cranbrook Institute of Science and has nearly 20 nocturnal species, including a two-toed sloth, striped skunk, three species of owls and 12 species of bats. By Eamon Devlin. FOR ALL POINTS.

SLEEPINGBEAR: Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore has dedicated a new segment of its heritage trail for bicyclists and hikers but work won’t be done until next spring. By Hannah Brenner. FOR LEELANAU, TRAVERSE CITY, PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS, CHEBOYGAN & ALL POINTS.

MICHIGANHOPS: The boom in Michigan microbreweries is fueling an expansion of hops production in the state, now the nation’s fourth-largest producer. Michigan’s climate is also a factor. The leading counties are Grand Traverse, Leelanau, Barry and Kent. We hear from an Atlas Township grower and experts from MSU Extension, New Holland Brewery and the Michigan Brewers Guild. By Josh Bender. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, TRAVERSE CITY, LEELANAU, HOLLAND & ALL POINTS.

w/MICHIGANHOPSPHOTO: Credit: MSU Extension

HISTORICLIGHTHOUSES: Three Lake Superior lighthouses, including the Presque Isle Harbor Breakwater Light in Marquette, have been added to the National Register of Historic Places, We hear from Coast Guard, National Park Service and National Register historians and the Great Lakes Lighthouse Keepers Association based in Mackinaw City. By Josh Bender. FOR MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, SAULT STE. MARIE, ST. IGNACE, CHEBOYGAN, LEELANAU & ALL POINTS.

w/HISTORICLIGHTHOUSEPHOTO: The Presque Isle Harbor Breakwater Light was built in 1941 to guide vessels shipping iron ore mined in the Upper Peninsula. Credit:  U.S. Coast Guard

TRIBES&WATER: Michigan tribes are actively engaged in protecting the waters of the Great Lakes. Among their concerns is the Enbridge pipeline under the Straits of Mackinac. We talk about their efforts with members of the Sault Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians and Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, and with the Center for Native Peoples and the Environment. By Kelly vanFrankenhuyzen FOR BAY MILLS, HARBOR SPRINGS, TRAVERSE CITY, LEELANAU, CHEBOYGAN, ST. IGNACE, SAULT STE. MARIE, MARQUETTE, ALCONA, LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, HOLLAND, PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS & ALL POINTS.

BUYALIGHTHOUSE? In the market for some truly unique property? Four Lake Michigan lighthouses are up for auction by the federal government. The North Manitou Offshore Lighthouse near the Manitou Islands, the Minneapolis Shoal Lighthouse at the entrance to Little Bay de Noc in the Upper Peninsula and the White Shoals and Grays Reef lighthouses, both between Emmet County and Beaver Island. By Josh Bender. FOR TRAVERSE CITY, PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS, BAY MILLS, MARQUETTE, SAULT STE. MARIE, LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, HOLLAND, ALCONA & ALL POINTS.

w/BUYALIGHTHOUSEPHOTO1: Lake Michigan’s Grays Reef Lighthouse near Beaver Island. Credit: U.S. General Services Administration.

w/BUYALIGHTHOUSEPHOTO2: The Minneapolis Shoal Lighthouse began operations in 1936 and became automated in 1979. Credit: U.S. General Services Administration.

POKEMANGO: If you want to see wildlife, go outside. The same is true for the critters in Pokémon Go. So while people chase the virtual wildlife in that popular new game, they’re getting a taste of real nature. State and local parks, including North Higgins Lake, Belle Island, Heritage Park in Farmington Hills and the Detroit News are seeing an uptick in player-visitors. By Eamon Devlin. FOR ALL POINTS,

CNS

Craft beer fuels Michigan hops binge

By JOSH BENDER

Capital News Service

LANSING — Michigan’s hop industry has exploded into the nation’s fourth-largest, according to a Michigan State University study.

Renewed hop production in the state began in response to a crop shortage elsewhere between 2007 and 2008 and to the growing popularity of Michigan’s craft beer, said Rob Sirrine, a MSU Extension expert.

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Credit MSU Extension

Michigan is home to between 60 and 90 commercial hop farms, Sirrine said.
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Want to buy a Great Lakes lighthouse?

By JOSH BENDER

Capital News Service

LANSING — If you’re in the market for some truly unique property, four Lake Michigan lighthouses are up for auction by the federal Government Services Administration.

For sale: The North Manitou Offshore Lighthouse near the Manitou Islands, the Minneapolis Shoal Lighthouse at the entrance to Little Bay de Noc in the Upper Peninsula and the White Shoals and Grays Reef lighthouses, both between Emmet County and Beaver Island.

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Lake Michigan’s Grays Reef Lighthouse near Beaver Island. Credit: U.S. General Services Administration.

The North Manitou Offshore Lighthouse began operating in 1935. It was one of the last lighthouses run by an actual crew until it became automated in 1980, according to Great Lakes lighthouse historian Kraig Anderson’s Lighthouse Friends database.
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Hunt for virtual wildlife leads to real nature encounters

By EAMON DEVLIN

Capital News Service

LANSING — If you want to see wildlife you go outside.

The same is true for the critters in Pokémon Go.

So while people chase the virtual wildlife in that popular new game, they’re getting a taste of real nature.
One group of Pokémon hunters even pooled their money to rent a boat to chase after the creatures on Lake Michigan, said Maia Turek, a recreation programmer with the Department of Natural Resources (DNR).
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Conservation in the Bat Zone

By EAMON DEVLIN

Capital News Service

LANSING — Michigan – Bat-ter up!

You can step up to the plate at the newly renovated Bat Zone in Bloomfield Hills.

We’re not talking new batting cages at a fun park. This is North America’s only sanctuary and education center for bats and other nocturnal creatures.  It is run by the Organization for Bat Conservation at the Cranbrook Institute of Science.

The building recently got a $35,000 facelift: new floors, heating and cooling systems and lighting thanks to about 300 small donations and the Organization for Bat Conservation’s board of directors, said Philip Garofalo, the group’s communications manager.
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Sleeping Bear trail system expands

By HANNAH BRENNER
Capital News Service

LANSING — A ribbon-cutting ceremony has marked the opening of a new segment of the Sleeping Bear Heritage Trail at the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore on the Leelanau Peninsula.

But a delay in delivering parts for a boardwalk over Narada Lake means that it is not yet fully in use, said Lee Jameson, the facility manager at the lakeshore park.

Work on the segment is expected to continue through the fall and possibly into next spring.
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Tribal communities strive to protect water quality

By KELLY vanFRANKENHUYZEN

Capital News Service

LANSING — Water warriors from tribes across the Great Lakes region are preserving an important relative.

It’s water – a resource so important that tribes refer to it in such personal terms.

“Water is a living resource, and we share an interdependent relationship with it,” said Daugherty Johnson III, environmental services manager at the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, in Harbor Springs.

Native Americans in the U.S. and First Nations in Canada believe water plays an important role historically, economically, politically, geographically and culturally.
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Shining lights on Great Lakes history

By JOSH BENDER

Capital News Service

LANSING — Three Lake Superior lighthouses, including one in the Upper Peninsula, were recently added to the National Register for Historic Places.

The Presque Isle Harbor Breakwater Light was built in 1941 to assist in shipping out iron ore mined in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, according to U.S .Coast Guard historian Daniel Koski-Karell, who applied to get the lighthouses added to the register.

Standing in Presque Isle Harbor, the light is still used for this purpose today.

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The Presque Isle Harbor Breakwater Light was built in 1941 to guide vessels shipping iron ore mined in the Upper Peninsula. Credit: U.S. Coast Guard

The harbor is the ninth-busiest in the Great Lakes, according to the National Register application. In addition to shipping out iron ore, the harbor receives freighters bearing coal to fuel the Presque Isle Power Plant.
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July 13, 2016 Summer Budget

JULY 14, 2016 — Summer Environmental Budget #2

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman & Dave Poulson

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/.

You can email us at cnsmsu@gmail.com

SECOND SUMMER ENVIRONMENTAL COVERAGE: Through our partnership with Great Lakes Echo, this is the second of three summer packages of Michigan environmental stories. The third set will come in August.

ENVIRONMENTAL PODCASTS:
You may also want to use this Great Lakes Echo Michigan environmental podcast on your website: “Anthology editor discusses art of being happy anyway in Flint at http://greatlakesecho.org/2016/07/06/anthology-editor-discusses-art-of-being-happy-anyway-in-flint.

HERE’S YOUR FILE:

UNDERWATERRESEARCH: Scientists are using satellite technology to spot submerged Great Lakes shipwrecks that may jeopardize navigation and release oil and toxic pollutants into the water. We hear from experts at the Great Lakes Shipwreck Historical Society, Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary and NASA. By Colleen Otte. FOR ALCONA, CHEBOYGAN, ST. IGNACE, SAULT STE. MARIE, MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, TRAVERSE CITY, LEELANAU, PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS, MANISTEE, LUDINGTON, OCEANA & ALL POINTS.

w/UNDERWATERRESEARCHPHOTO: A diver investigates the wheel from the sunken schooner “FT Barney” in Lake Huron. Credit: Joe Hoyt/NOAA, Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary.

WOLVES&DEER: Grey wolves, resurgent in the U.P., are good for wildflowers and young red maples and sugar maples. That’s because one of their favorite prey, white-tailed deer, are adapting their grazing behavior to avoid high wolf-use areas, says a study done in the Western U.P.by DNR and Notre Dame scientists. That increases the chances for survival of such wildflowers as nodding trillium and the Canada mayflower, as well as young maples that otherwise would be on the deer’s menu. By Eric Freedman. FOR MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, SAULT STE MARIE, CHEBOYGAN, ST. IGNACE & ALL POINTS.

W/WOLVESDEERPHOTO: White-tailed deer. Credit: Department of Natural Resources.

PARKVISITORS: Michigan’s state park system is trying to expand its visitor base, including attracting first-time campers, and strengthen its environmental protection efforts. We also look at similar efforts in neighboring Ontario and Ohio and hear about the Wisconsin state parks’ financial woes.  By Josh Bender. FOR ALL POINTS

WATER&TOURISM: It’s too early to know if national and international attention on Flint’s municipal water crisis may tarnish the Great Lakes region’s image of pure water, but there is a tie between the perceived quality of water and its value. We hear from experts from Travel Michigan — which works with 42 local partners, such as Alpena, Charlevoix, Grand Rapids, Michigan Wines and Detroit, and whose Pure Michigan campaign marks its 10th anniversary — MSU, DNR and water-related companies in Detroit and Plymouth. By Kelly vanFrankenhuyzen. FOR ALL POINTS.

w/WATER&TOURISMPHOTO: Lake Michigan sunset near Petoskey. Credit: Kelly vanFrankenhuyzen.

HOPEFORASH: Researchers at MSU and Wayne State say the devastation wrought by the emerald ash borer in Michigan may not be total. Studies done in areas where a single ash species — green ash — grows found that dying trees made room for new ash seedlings rather than other species. Meanwhile, a facility in Brighton is breeding and releasing the Asian wasp which preys on the borer, By Colleen Otte. FOR ALLPOINTS.

LOOKINGATFLINT:  Former Flint Journal reporter Scott Atkinson, who now teaches at the University of Michigan-Flint, has compiled an anthology of stories about America’s industrial Outback. “Happy Anyway: A Flint Anthology” contains some of the first non-news stories published about Flint since that city gained international attention for lead in its water. But these are stories that refuse to treat that crisis as the city’s defining moment. They barely mention it. The story of Flint is deeply nuanced. The water disaster is just another challenge to overcome for people who remain defiantly happy. Commentary. By Dave Poulson. FOR ALL POINTS.

w/LOOKINGATFLINTCOVER: “Happy Anyway: A Flint Anthology.” Credit: Belt Publishing.

CNS

 

Should tourism support environmental protection?

By KELLY vanFRANKHUYZEN
Capital News Service
LANSING — It’s too early to know if national and international attention on Flint’s municipal water crisis may tarnish the Great Lakes region’s image of pure water.

But there is a tie between the perceived quality of water and its value, experts say.

“I hope that the tourist industry gives back funding for protection and remediation,” said Joan Rose, Homer Nowlin Endowed Chair of Water Research at Michigan State University. That’s a worldwide approach “we have to do in the future,” she said. For example, there should be a tie between tourism and Peru’s challenges with sewage treatment and water reclamation at Machu Picchu.

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Lake Michigan sunset near Petoskey. Credit: Kelly vanFrankenhuyzen

Some countries are planning or seeking partners to make such connections, she said.

The $33 million-a-year “Pure Michigan” promotion campaign features well-known state landmarks and scenes. Water plays a critical role in that campaign. And it’s critical to Michigan’s top three industries: automotive, agriculture and tourism.
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