Oct. 31, 2014 Budget

Oct. 31, 2014 – Week 8
To: CNS Editors
From: Eric Freedman & Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/. For technical problems, contact CNS tech manager Tanya Voloshina (248-943-8979) voloshin@msu.edu.

You can email us at cnsmsu@gmail.com.

All articles ©2014, Capital News Service, Michigan State University School of Journalism. Nonmembers cannot reproduce CNS articles without written permission.

CORRECTION: A story about the reuse of former newspaper buildings should have said that Dan Gilbert, the chair of Quicken Loans Inc., bought the former Detroit News building. We have corrected the story on the CNS website.

HERE’S YOUR FILE:

HATCHERIES: DNR reports record-low numbers of salmon eggs gathered at state collection sites this year, meaning fewer will be released into the wild before the start of next year’s fishing season. In Manistee County, just 2,700 chinook salmon returned to the collection site on the Little Manistee River. The Traverse City site also experienced a sharp decline. Experts blame competition from invasive species for food in Lake Michigan. This season’s eggs have been transferred to hatcheries in Schoolcraft, Van Buren and Benzie counties. By Ian K. Kullgren. FOR CADILLAC, PETOSKEY, TRAVERSE CITY, HARBOR SPRINGS, MARQUETTE, SAULT STE. MARIE, BAY MILLS, LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, BIG RAPIDS, STURGIS, THREE RIVERS, HOLLAND & ALL POINTS.

CONSORTIUM: A state Education Department-led consortium is providing new opportunities, including a tuition incentive, to prepare more teachers to work with students who are blind, visually impaired, deaf or hard of hearing. Saginaw Valley, Western Michigan and Eastern Michigan universities and Aquinas College are part of it. We hear from Education Department, Grand Valley and Ottawa Intermediate School District experts. By Jordan Bradley. FOR HOLLAND, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, GREENVILLE, MICHIGAN CITIZEN, STURGIS, THREE RIVERS & ALL POINTS.

HEALTHTESTS: Health authorities are awaiting results of tests for elevated levels of chemicals and metals in people who eat lots of Great Lakes fish. Blood and urine from volunteers in Michigan, Minnesota and New York were tested for PCBs, pesticides, mercury, lead and cadmium. Michigan tested anglers along the Detroit River and Saginaw Bay. By Danielle Woodward. FOR MICHIGAN CITIZEN, ALPENA, ALCONA, PETOSKEY, TRAVERSE CITY, HARBOR SPRINGS, CHEBOYGAN, LUDINGTON, HOLLAND, MANISTEE, ST. IGNACE, SAULT STE. MARIE, BAY MILLS & ALL POINTS.

BEES: Bee pollination is necessary for crop production, including apples, blueberries, grapes and leafy greens, but bees, crucial to food security in the Great Lakes region, are declining. Pesticides, a parasite and shrinking habitat are blamed. A $69 million grant to MSU will help develop sustainable pollination strategies for specialty crops. We hear from USDA and a Jackson beekeeper. For news and farm pages. By Ruth Krug. FOR HOLLAND, LUDINGTON, CADILLAC, STURGIS, THREE RIVERS, GREENVILLE, CRAWFORD COUNTY, CHEBOYGAN, BIG RAPIDS, MANISTEE, ALPENA, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, ALCONA & ALL POINTS.
w/BEESPHOTO: Honeybee. Credit: U.S. Department of Agriculture.

JOBDISCRIMINATION: Federal courts have dealt two blows to the state in job discrimination-related suits by former employees. A judge in Detroit ruled that a former legal secretary supervisor assigned to the Unemployment Insurance Agency can pursue her hostile workplace claim. An appeals court granted a new trial to a retired State Police sergeant who claims she was targeted for retaliation and reassigned from Newaygo to Rockford to Detroit after she complained of sexual harassment. By Eric Freedman. FOR MICHIGAN CITIZEN, DEADLINE DETROIT, LUDINGTON, BIG RAPIDS, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS & ALL POINTS.

WILDNERNESSFUTURE: The National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Fish & Wildlife Service and two other agencies have launched a five-year study of the federal wilderness preservation system. Michigan has 16 federal wildernesses, ranging from giant Isle Royale Wilderness in Lake Superior to tiny Michigan Islands Wilderness in Lake Huron. By Eric Freedman. FOR CADILLAC, CRAWFORD COUNTY, GLADWIN, ALPENA, ALCONA, CHEBOYGAN, TRAVERSE CITY, LUDINGTON, LAKE COUNTY, HARBOR SPRINGS, HERALD STAR, BAY MILLS, GREENVILLE, SAULT STE. MARIE, HOLLAND, MANISTEE, BIG RAPIDS, MARQUETTE & ALL POINTS.
w/ WILDERNESSFUTUREBEAVERBASINPHOTO: Beaver Basin Wilderness in Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore. Credit: National Park Service
w/ WILDERNESSFUTURENORDHOUSEPHOTO: Nordhouse Dunes Wilderness in Huron-Manistee National Forest. Credit: U.S. Forest Service
w/WILDERNESSFUTURELIST: 16 federal wildernesses in Michigan. Credit: www.wilderness.net.

CNS

State, schools reduce special ed teacher shortage

By JORDAN BRADLEY
Capital News Service

LANSING – As the Michigan Consortium for Teacher Endorsement for Deaf/Hard of Hearing and Visually Impairment gains interest, more teachers will be prepared for jobs in high-shortage areas.

To address shortages in specific areas of special education, the Department of Education partnered with 14 colleges and universities across the state and country to create the consortium in 2012.

It offers classes online and seminars for teachers to earn an additional endorsement for education students in grades K-12. The endorsement would take an average of two years to complete.
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Salmon fishing outlook steady despite fewer eggs collected

By IAN K. KULLGREN

Capital News Service

LANSING — Natural resources officials are reporting record-low numbers of salmon eggs gathered at state collection sites this year, evidence that could have implications for future fishing seasons.

In Manistee County, just 2,700 chinook salmon returned to the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) collection site on the Little Manistee River, down from a previous low of about 5,800 in 2010.

The same is true in Traverse City, where 1,300 fish returned, a notable drop from the 1993 low of 2,300. DNR workers trap the salmon in weirs throughout the summer season, and then harvest their eggs in the fall to be bred at hatcheries across the state
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State workers get go-ahead in job discrimination cases

By ERIC FREEDMAN

Capital News Service

LANSING – Federal courts have dealt a double defeat to the state in job discrimination-related suits by former employees.

In one newly decided case, a judge in Detroit ruled that a legal secretary for the Unemployment Insurance Agency can pursue her allegation of a racially and sexually hostile workplace.

U.S. District Judge Gershwin Drain said Sonya Bradley, who is African American, presented enough evidence of harassment by supervisors and co-workers to let the claim against three white supervisors to proceed. Continue reading

U.S. wilderness areas study includes 16 in Michigan

By ERIC FREEDMAN

Capital News Service

LANSING – The federal government has launched a five-year study of the National Wilderness Preservation System, but public land agencies say they have no plans for major changes in Michigan’s 16 designated wilderness areas.

The project involves five public agencies. Three of them – the National Park Service, Fish & Wildlife Service and Forest Service – manage land in Michigan.

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Nordhouse Dunes Wilderness in Huron-Manistee National Forest. Credit: U.S. Forest Service


The best known Michigan sites are Sleeping Bear Dunes Wilderness – the state’s newest – and Nordhouse Dunes Wilderness in the Lower Peninsula. In the Upper Peninsula, Isle Royale Wilderness, the largest in the state, is part of Isle Royale National Park.
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Intensified efforts, MSU research project to save bees underway

By RUTH KRUG

Capital News Service

LANSING – Bees are declining in the northeastern United States and southern Canada, according to a recent study by the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently awarded Michigan State University a $6.9 million grant to develop sustainable pollination strategies for specialty crops.

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U.S. Department of Agriculture


Bee pollination is necessary for the production of many crops, including apples, blueberries, grapes and leafy greens.
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Folks who eat fish tested, show high mercury levels

By DANIELLE WOODWARD

Capital News Service

LANSING – Health authorities in Michigan are waiting for the results of tests for elevated levels of chemicals and metals in people who eat lots of Great Lakes fish.

Blood and urine from volunteers in Michigan and two other states were tested for PCBs, pesticides, mercury, lead and cadmium.

Each state focused on a community. Michigan tested anglers along the Detroit River and Saginaw Bay.
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October 24, 2014 Budget

Oct. 24, 2014 – Week 7
To: CNS Editors
From: Eric Freedman & Sheila Schimpf
http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/. For technical problems, contact CNS tech manager Tanya Voloshina (248-943-8979) voloshin@msu.edu.

You can email us at cnsmsu@gmail.com.

All articles ©2014, Capital News Service, Michigan State University School of Journalism. Nonmembers cannot reproduce CNS articles without written permission.
COMMUNITY COLLEGES AHEAD: We will interview Michael Hansen, president of the Michigan Community College Association, next Monday, Oct. 27. Potential topics include tuition trends, preparing students for “green economy” jobs, student debt patterns, legislative priorities and international student enrollment trends.
HERE’S YOUR FILE:

COMMISSION: Two legislators from Canton and Muskegon want the state to set up a commission that would focus on equal pay. The bill has been stalled in committee for months but it has the support of the Michigan AFL-CIO. We talk to the AFL-CIO’s Karla Swift and the Department of Civil Rights. By Jordan Bradley. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS JOURNAL & ALL POINTS.

WOLVESMICHIGANCANADA: Hunting isn’t the only issue in the debate about wolves in Michigan. Other factors include population size, public attitudes toward the animal and management of wolves on both sides of the international border. By Anthony Cepak. FOR MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, SAULT STE. MARIE, CHEBOYGAN, ST. IGNACE & ALL POINTS.
w/WOLVESMICHIGANCANADAGRAPHIC: Michigan’s wolf population, 1998-2013. Source: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.
w/WOLVESMICHIGANCANADAPHOTO: Credit: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

NATIONALGUARDWIND: The National Guard is spending $1.5 million on two new machines to generate electricity from wind at Camp Grayling and the Fort Custer Training Center. Unlike traditional windmills, the system captures wind from all directions and will be built by a Roscommon County company. We hear from the manufacturer, the National Guard and a wind funnel skeptic. By Qing Zhang. FOR CRAWFORD COUNTY, STURGIS, THREE RIVERS, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS & ALL POINTS.
w/NATIONALGUARDWINDGRAPHIC: Design of the wind funnels to be installed at Camp Grayling and Fort Custer. Credit: Sheerwind Co.

FALLCOLORS: Fall colors are slower to peak this year than usual, and last winter’s extreme cold is to blame. About 2 million people traveled in Michigan to see fall colors last year, and fall color tours contributed about $294 million to the economy. Pure Michigan and an MSU horticulturalist explain. By Juliana Moxley. FOR MARQUETTE, SAULT STE. MARIE, CHEBOYGAN, TRAVERSE CITY, HARBOR SPRINGS, ALCONA, ALPENA, CADILLAC, LUDINGTON, GLADWIN, CRAWFORD COUNTY, MANISTEE, LAKE COUNTY, PETOSKEY, HERALD STAR, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS & ALL POINTS.
w/FALLCOLORSPHOTO: This tree has turned a brilliant red at a Michigan state park. Credit: Pure Michigan.

CEMETERY: Old cemeteries contain the history, the fashions and the hopes of generations now gone, Thomas Dilley says in his new book, “The Art of Memory: Historic Cemeteries of Grand Rapids, Michigan,” a new book published by Wayne State University Press ($39.99). Dilley is the expert on Grand Rapids cemeteries, leading tour groups, researching markers and linking them to people and national trends. The thing is, Dilley says, almost every old town that once had a flourishing industry also had a cemetery of note, and the stories are there for the taking. We talk about touring cemeteries with Dilley and someone from the Marquette Regional History Center and add Elmwood Cemetery in Detroit for good measure. By Sheila Schimpf. FOR GREENVILLE, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, MARQUETTE, DEADLINE DETROIT, MICHIGAN CITIZEN & ALL POINTS.
w/CEMETERYCOVER: Credit: Wayne State University Press.

VOTERID: Courts in other states are wrestling with challenges to voter ID laws but Michigan’s law remains firmly in place. Supporters argue they prevent fraud, while critics counter they discourage citizen participation. Michigan is more restrictive than many other states on absentee ballots, early voting and vote-by-mail. It’s an issue in the secretary of state contest. We hear from the AFL-CIO president, ACLU and Mecosta and Crawford county clerks. By Eric Freedman: FOR MICHIGAN CITIZEN, BIG RAPIDS, CRAWFORD COUNTY, DEADLINE DETROIT, LANSING CITY PULSE & ALL POINTS.

WILDFIRES: Michigan had an unusually small number of wildfires this year. Credit an unusually large amount of rain. Meanwhile, a small number of counties have developed DNR-approved community wildfire protection plans, including Oceana, Newaygo, Lake, Crawford, Manistee, Baraga, Marquette, Alger and Luce. We talk to the DNR, the Huron-Manistee National Forest and fire chiefs in Alpena and Grand Traverse counties. By Eric Freedman. FOR MANISTEE, ALPENA, LUDINGTON, CRAWFORD COUNTY, ALCONA, MARQUETTE, SAULT STE. MARIE, CHEBOYGAN, PETOSKEY, GLADWIN, TRAVERSE CITY, LAKE COUNTY, CADILLAC & ALL POINTS.
w/WILDFIREPHOTO: Credit: Department of Natural Resources.
CNS

Pay equity commission stuck in committee

By JORDAN BRADLEY
Capital News Service

LANSING – A bill to create a commission on pay equity is stalled in the House Government Operations Committee, but it might get a chance in December.

The Commission on Pay Equity, as it would be known, would “develop definitions of comparable wages, using the criteria of composite skills, responsibility, effort, education or training, and working conditions,” according to the bill.

Karla Swift, president of the Michigan AFL-CIO, said she would like to see the bill passed in the lame-duck session in December.
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For an uplifting walk in a park, find a cemetery

By SHEILA SCHIMPF

Capital News Service

LANSING – The idea of graveyard as park, with landscaping designed to aid contemplation and to encourage the illusion that the visitor had left the regular world behind, is a surprisingly modern one.

In fact, in this country it goes back only to the 1830s, says Thomas Dilley, author of “The Art of Memory: Historic Cemeteries of Grand Rapids, Michigan,” a new book published by Wayne State University Press ($39.99).

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The Art of Memory: Historic Cemeteries of Grand Rapids, Michigan by Thomas Dilley


Before the 1830s, graves were in or near churches, clustered in tight places. But then, as churches ran out of room, cities dedicated large empty tracts, either within the city or just outside, as burial places. The vacant space had to be structured for the dead and the living who came to bury and visit them.
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