July 13, 2016 Summer Budget

JULY 14, 2016 — Summer Environmental Budget #2

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman & Dave Poulson

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/.

You can email us at cnsmsu@gmail.com

SECOND SUMMER ENVIRONMENTAL COVERAGE: Through our partnership with Great Lakes Echo, this is the second of three summer packages of Michigan environmental stories. The third set will come in August.

ENVIRONMENTAL PODCASTS:
You may also want to use this Great Lakes Echo Michigan environmental podcast on your website: “Anthology editor discusses art of being happy anyway in Flint at http://greatlakesecho.org/2016/07/06/anthology-editor-discusses-art-of-being-happy-anyway-in-flint.

HERE’S YOUR FILE:

UNDERWATERRESEARCH: Scientists are using satellite technology to spot submerged Great Lakes shipwrecks that may jeopardize navigation and release oil and toxic pollutants into the water. We hear from experts at the Great Lakes Shipwreck Historical Society, Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary and NASA. By Colleen Otte. FOR ALCONA, CHEBOYGAN, ST. IGNACE, SAULT STE. MARIE, MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, TRAVERSE CITY, LEELANAU, PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS, MANISTEE, LUDINGTON, OCEANA & ALL POINTS.

w/UNDERWATERRESEARCHPHOTO: A diver investigates the wheel from the sunken schooner “FT Barney” in Lake Huron. Credit: Joe Hoyt/NOAA, Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary.

WOLVES&DEER: Grey wolves, resurgent in the U.P., are good for wildflowers and young red maples and sugar maples. That’s because one of their favorite prey, white-tailed deer, are adapting their grazing behavior to avoid high wolf-use areas, says a study done in the Western U.P.by DNR and Notre Dame scientists. That increases the chances for survival of such wildflowers as nodding trillium and the Canada mayflower, as well as young maples that otherwise would be on the deer’s menu. By Eric Freedman. FOR MARQUETTE, BAY MILLS, SAULT STE MARIE, CHEBOYGAN, ST. IGNACE & ALL POINTS.

W/WOLVESDEERPHOTO: White-tailed deer. Credit: Department of Natural Resources.

PARKVISITORS: Michigan’s state park system is trying to expand its visitor base, including attracting first-time campers, and strengthen its environmental protection efforts. We also look at similar efforts in neighboring Ontario and Ohio and hear about the Wisconsin state parks’ financial woes.  By Josh Bender. FOR ALL POINTS

WATER&TOURISM: It’s too early to know if national and international attention on Flint’s municipal water crisis may tarnish the Great Lakes region’s image of pure water, but there is a tie between the perceived quality of water and its value. We hear from experts from Travel Michigan — which works with 42 local partners, such as Alpena, Charlevoix, Grand Rapids, Michigan Wines and Detroit, and whose Pure Michigan campaign marks its 10th anniversary — MSU, DNR and water-related companies in Detroit and Plymouth. By Kelly vanFrankenhuyzen. FOR ALL POINTS.

w/WATER&TOURISMPHOTO: Lake Michigan sunset near Petoskey. Credit: Kelly vanFrankenhuyzen.

HOPEFORASH: Researchers at MSU and Wayne State say the devastation wrought by the emerald ash borer in Michigan may not be total. Studies done in areas where a single ash species — green ash — grows found that dying trees made room for new ash seedlings rather than other species. Meanwhile, a facility in Brighton is breeding and releasing the Asian wasp which preys on the borer, By Colleen Otte. FOR ALLPOINTS.

LOOKINGATFLINT:  Former Flint Journal reporter Scott Atkinson, who now teaches at the University of Michigan-Flint, has compiled an anthology of stories about America’s industrial Outback. “Happy Anyway: A Flint Anthology” contains some of the first non-news stories published about Flint since that city gained international attention for lead in its water. But these are stories that refuse to treat that crisis as the city’s defining moment. They barely mention it. The story of Flint is deeply nuanced. The water disaster is just another challenge to overcome for people who remain defiantly happy. Commentary. By Dave Poulson. FOR ALL POINTS.

w/LOOKINGATFLINTCOVER: “Happy Anyway: A Flint Anthology.” Credit: Belt Publishing.

CNS

 

Should tourism support environmental protection?

By KELLY vanFRANKHUYZEN
Capital News Service
LANSING — It’s too early to know if national and international attention on Flint’s municipal water crisis may tarnish the Great Lakes region’s image of pure water.

But there is a tie between the perceived quality of water and its value, experts say.

“I hope that the tourist industry gives back funding for protection and remediation,” said Joan Rose, Homer Nowlin Endowed Chair of Water Research at Michigan State University. That’s a worldwide approach “we have to do in the future,” she said. For example, there should be a tie between tourism and Peru’s challenges with sewage treatment and water reclamation at Machu Picchu.

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Lake Michigan sunset near Petoskey. Credit: Kelly vanFrankenhuyzen

Some countries are planning or seeking partners to make such connections, she said.

The $33 million-a-year “Pure Michigan” promotion campaign features well-known state landmarks and scenes. Water plays a critical role in that campaign. And it’s critical to Michigan’s top three industries: automotive, agriculture and tourism.
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Anglers enlisted in water fight

By COLLEEN OTTE

Capital News Service

LANSING — Alert anglers are to the Great Lakes what the military is to the United States: the last line of defense against invaders.

“Anglers are kind of the eyes and ears on the water for us,” said Seth Herbst, aquatic invasive species coordinator for the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Fisheries Division.

A recent study by researchers at Cornell University found that anglers in the Great Lakes region are aware of and concerned about the threat of aquatic invasive species.

Already such invaders have significantly altered the ecological makeup of the Great Lakes.
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Of wolves, deer, wildflowers and maples

By ERIC FREEDMAN

Capital News Service
LANSING — Grey wolves are good for wildflowers like the nodding trillium and the Canada mayflower in the Great Lakes region.

They’re also good for young red maples and sugar maples.

That’s because white-tailed deer are bad for both wildflowers and maple saplings.

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White-tailed deer. Credit: Department of Natural Resources

And wolves are bad for deer.

With the resurgence of wolves in the region, smart deer are learning to keep away from areas with many of the predators, meaning that wildflowers and young maples there have a better chance of survival, according to a recent study by scientists from the University of Notre Dame and the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR).
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Flint through different lenses

By DAVID POULSON

Capital News Service

LANSING — I got to know Scott Atkinson in a Land Rover rattling through the Australian Outback.

That was in 2004 when he was a student in my study abroad class.  I figured him for Hemingway-like aspirations. Within days of our arrival, he bought a kangaroo-hide hat that rocked an Indiana Jones vibe.

He wrote about our Aboriginal guide, a man who sought his ancient roots – connections that had been severed by a government policy that produced what is now called Australia’s Stolen Generation.

“He may not yet be Hemingway, but the kid knows a good story,” I thought.

Still does.

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“Happy Anyway: A Flint Anthology.” Credit: Belt Publishing

A dozen years later, Atkinson, a former Flint Journal reporter who now teaches writing at the University of Michigan-Flint, has compiled an anthology of stories about America’s industrial Outback.
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Eye in the sky looks at Great Lakes wrecks

By COLLEEN OTTE

Capital News Service

LANSING — When spotting submerged shipwrecks proved difficult, researchers oddly looked to the sky.
Shipwrecks can threaten the Great Lakes environment if remaining onboard fuel leaks or they harbor invasive species that like to stick to them.

A recent study in the Journal of Archaeological Science suggests that satellite imagery can be used to locate these potentially hazardous wrecks that may otherwise go unnoticed.

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A diver investigates the wheel from the schooner “FT Barney” in Lake Huron. Credit: Joe Hoyt/NOAA, Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary.

Shipwreck searchers rely on sonar in deep waters and airborne laser systems in clear waters. But neither method is as effective for near shore areas with cloudy, shallow waters, according to the study.
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Hope for ash?

By COLLEEN OTTE

Capital News Service

LANSING —

Experts used to say the number of ash lost in Michigan was tens of millions.

Now they say hundreds of millions, according to Deborah McCullough, a professor of entomology and forestry in Michigan State University. Still, there’s hope for the ash’s survival.

“In a nutshell, what I found is that ash seems to be holding on quite well,” said Dan Kashian, who studies ash tree regeneration.
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State parks vie for new campers

By JOSH BENDER

Capital News Service

LANSING — To attract new visitors and save money, many state parks in Michigan and across the Great Lakes region are updating utilities and campsites and creating programming for less traditional visitors.

That includes seek growth in usership by trying to attract non-campers.

For example, those participating in Michigan’s First Time Camper program and Ontario’s Learn to Camp program arrive to a fully set-up campsite with park employees to guide them.
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Summer Environmental Budget #1, June 9, 2016

June 9, 2016 — Summer Environmental Budget #1

To: CNS Editors

From: Eric Freedman & Dave Poulson

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/.

You can email us at cnsmsu@gmail.com

FIRST SUMMER ENVIRONMENTAL COVERAGE: Through our partnership with Great Lakes Echo, this is the first of three summer packages of Michigan environmental stories. The others will come in early July and early August.

ENVIRONMENTAL PODCASTS:
You may also want to use these two Great Lakes Echo Michigan environmental podcasts by Marie Orttenburger on your website:

“Everyone into the (vernal) pool”:  http://greatlakesecho.org/2016/05/27/local-learning-field-trip-to-the-neighborhood-vernal-pool/

“Turning off the lights to see the sky’s stories”: http://greatlakesecho.org/2016/05/20/turning-off-the-lights-to-see-the-skys-stories/

Here is your file:

FERRYRESEARCH: Tourists traveling on the Emerald Isle ferry between Charlevoix and Beaver Island are riding with groundbreaking cargo this summer, equipment to detect changes in Lake Michigan’s temperature and chemistry courtesy of Central Michigan University. Among the benefits, the temperature data may help recreational and commercial anglers predict fish behavior, By Josh Bender. FOR LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, HOLLAND, OCEANA, PETOSKEY, TRAVERSE CITY, CHEBOYGAN, LEELANAU & ALL POINTS.

w/FERRYRESEARCHPHOTO: Don Uzarski, the director of Central Michigan University’s Institute for Great Lakes Research and its biological station on Beaver Island, collects data aboard the Emerald Isle ferry. Credit: Central Michigan University.

SALMONSPORTFISHING: After a half-century of salmon fishing in the Great Lakes, anglers are on edge because numbers of the prized Chinook – or king – salmon have spiraled downward as numbers of native lake trout and whitefish rebound. The tale began in 1966 when first Coho and then Chinook salmon were brought from the Pacific Northwest to the Great Lakes to eat another nonnative fish, the alewife – had invaded the Great Lakes through canals. By Kevin Duffy. For ALCONA, MARQUETTE, SAULT ST. MARIE, BAY MILLS, LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, OCEANA, TRAVERSE CITY, LEELANAU, HARBOR SPRINGS, PETOSKEY, HOLLAND, CHEBOYGAN & ALL POINTS.

w/SALMONSPORTFISHINGPHOTO: Chinook salmon. Credit: Michigan Sea Grant.

CORMORANTS: Cormorants may be getting a bum rap among Great Lakes anglers who claim the birds are devastating the commercial and sports fishery. The first study of cormorants’ diets in southern Lake Michigan found that they’re eating invasive species such as alewives and round goby — not the prized salmon and trout. Similar results have been found in the Beaver Archipelago of northern Lake Michigan and in Saginaw Bay. By Eric Freedman. FOR ALCONA, CHEBOYGAN, SAULT STE MARIE, LUDINGTON, HOLLAND, MANISTEE, TRAVERSE CITY, PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS, LEELANAU, BAY MILLS, MARQUETTE & ALL POINTS.

w/CORMORANTSPHOTO1: Cormorants at a southern Lake Michigan colony. Credit: Patrick. Madura.

w/CORMORANTSPHOTO2: Collecting pellets at a southern Lake Michigan cormorant colony. Credit: Patrick Madura.

ARTIST: Retired MSU zoologist James Atkinson reveals unseen aquatic life through his art. The ex-MSU professor, now living in St. Clair County, collects microscopic fauna from around Michigan to inspire his paintings and provide insights to the public about the natural world. By Josh Bender. FOR LANSING CITY PULSE & ALL POINTS.

w/ARTISTPHOTO1. Artist James Atkinson prepares to video microscopic organisms. Credit: Josh Bender

w/ARTISTPHOTO2: Chaetogaster is a segmented worm that preys on water fleas and, as depicted here, a flatworm. It’s common in lakes and ponds throughout Michigan, including the Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: James Atkinson

CNS

Retired zoologist reveals unseen life through his art

By JOSH BENDER

Capital News Service

LANSING — James Atkinson’s art draws inspiration from a plethora of microscopic life found in a single drop of pond water.

The St. Clair County artist paints from still images taken from videos of organisms that the retired zoologist shoots through a microscope. Filming the critters began as a way to engage students during his teaching career at Michigan State University.

Painting came toward the end of his 43-year academic career, he said. “I wanted to get people in general to realize how beautiful these creatures are, so I decided to start painting.”

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Artist James Atkinson prepares to video microscopic organisms. Credit: Josh Bender

Capturing microscopic fauna in a way that shows their relationship to the larger environment requires a keen eye that blends scientific and artistic skills, he said.
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