Feb. 5, 2016 Budget

Capital News Service Budget – Week 3

Feb. 5, 2016

To: CNS Editors

From: David Poulson and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/. For technical problems, contact CNS tech manager Tanya Voloshina (248-943-8979) voloshin@msu.edu.

You can email us at cnsmsu@gmail.com

Here’s your file:

NETPEN:  A proposal to farm fish in Michigan’s Great Lakes may violate the rights of some Native American tribes in the state, according to representatives from several of Michigan’s five  tribes. By Joshua Bender. FOR BAY MILLS, LEELANAU, MARQUETTE, SAULT ST. MARIE, ST. IGNACE, TRAVERSE CITY, CHEBOYGAN, LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, HOLLAND, PETOSKEY, ALCONA AND ALL POINTS.

LINE5: Local communities are getting in on the controversy over an aging oil pipeline connecting Michigan’s upper and lower peninsulas. Even though they have little say in the matter, they are increasingly passing resolutions opposing them. By Jasmine Watts. FOR CHEBOYGAN, ST. IGNACE, SAULT STE. MARIE, TRAVERSE CITY, PETOSKEY AND ALL POINTS.

TEACHERSTRIKE: Teachers could lose their teaching certificate and have a fine deducted from their annual salaries if they participate in a sickout to stop schools from operating, if bills proposed in the legislature pass. We hear from the MEA and Michigan Association of School Admnistrators. Legislayors from St. Clair, Hamburg and Grand Blanc are sponsors. A Dearborn Heights lawmaker is opposed. By Jason Kraft. FOR ALL POINTS.

BIRDCRASHES: You hear an unpleasant thud; unsettled and surprised you investigate. The culprit is a bird, dead on arrival. Like a scene out of an Alfred Hitchcock movie, birds are crashing into windows at alarming rates. You may say, “Birds crash into windows, who gives a cluck?” Actually, quite a few people do. For example, the Kalamazoo Nature Center built a preschool with windows that are easier for birds to see.  By Kayla Smith. FOR STURGIS, THREE RIVERS & ALL POINTS.

w/BIRDCRASHESPHOTO: Cities are dangerous for migrating birds. Credit: Fatal Light Awareness Program

HISTORICSITESLOWERPENINSULA: Sites in Elk Rapids, Saugatuck, Alpena and Detroit have been added to the National Register of Historic Places. Two of them also now serve as local history museums. By Eric Freedman, FOR HOLLAND, PETOSKEY, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, ALCONA, MONTMORENCY & ALL POINTS.

w/HISTORICSITESPUMPHOUSEPHOTO: Saugatuck Pump House. Credit: Saugatuck-Douglas Historical Society

w/HISTORICSITESELKRAPIDSCHURCHPHOTO: Former First Methodist Episcopal Church of Elk Rapids. Credit: Michigan State Housing Development Authority.

w/HISTORICSITESALPENAODDFELLOWSPHOTO: IOFF Centennial Building in Alpena. Credit: Flickr.

ASIANCARP – A new study says that Asian carp could decimate walleye and other native species if they invade Lake Erie. Another study is evaluating the economic impact. We speak with researchers at Michigan State University and the University of Michigan. By Kevin Duffy. FOR ALL POINTS.

Some Native American tribes in Michigan battle fish farming proposal

By JOSHUA BENDER
Capital News Service

LANSING — A proposal to farm fish in Michigan’s Great Lakes may violate the rights of some Native American tribes in the state, according to representatives from several of Michigan’s five Native American tribes.

This new method, called net pen aquaculture, raises fish in enclosed areas within the Great Lakes. Separate bills promoting and banning commercial net pen aquaculture were recently debated in the House committees on natural resources and agriculture,

Opponents of commercial net pen aquaculture in the Great Lakes say the method threatens the lakes’ water quality and fish by creating new opportunities for the spread of disease and invasive species.
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Bills would penalize teacher sick-outs

By JASON KRAFT

Capital News Service

LANSING – Teachers who strike illegally –or participate in sick outs– could lose their teaching certificate or be fined a day’s pay for each day that they didn’t teach, under recently proposed legislation.

The bills, sponsored by Sen. Phil Pavlov, R-St. Clair, Sen. David Robertson, R-Grand Blanc, and Sen. Joe Hune, R-Hamburg, would change the definition of a strike to include a situation when multiple teachers call in sick.

The bills were approved by the Committee on Education and await action by the full Senate.
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Opposition to pipeline spreading across state

By JASMINE WATTS
Capital News Service

LANSING — Some Michigan communities are calling on state officials to shut down an aging oil pipeline between the state’s Upper and Lower peninsulas, even though they lack jurisdiction in the matter.

Line 5 is a 63-year-old oil pipeline owned by Enbridge Inc., a private Canadian company, at the bottom of the Straits of Mackinac where Lake Michigan and Lake Huron meet.

Line 5 now operates at more than 80 percent of its original design capacity. Environmentalists say they are afraid it will rupture.
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Asian carp would change fish species in Lake Erie

By KEVIN DUFFY

Capital News Service

LANSING — A new study by researchers based in Ann Arbor suggests that Asian carp would disrupt the food web and decimate native species like walleye if they invade Lake Erie.

And that could blunt the economic impact anglers have on nearby communities.

A second study by a Michigan State University economics researcher will compare the study’s predicted changes in fish population and the number of fishing trips taken in the region.

Invasive silver and bighead carp are already abundant in nearby Great Lakes watersheds . They devour microscopic plants called phytoplankton and animals called zooplankton, the first food of popular fish like walleye and Chinook salmon.
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Michigan gets four Historic Place designations

By ERIC FREEDMAN

Capital News Service

LANSING — The roster of Lower Peninsula sites on the National Register of Historic Places has grown by four with new designations in Saugatuck, Elk Rapids, Alpena and Detroit.

Among them are a 1904 pump house and a turn-of-the-20th-century church, both now serving as local history museums.

detroitriverfront

Former First Methodist Episcopal Church of Elk Rapids. Credit: Michigan State Housing Development Authority.


“The National Register is the official list of the nation’s historic places worthy of preservation,” according to the National Park Service (NPS), which administers the program.
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Bird-safe glass helps birdbrains avoid windows

By KAYLA SMITH

Capital News Service

LANSING — You hear an unpleasant thud; unsettled and surprised you investigate. The culprit is a bird, dead on arrival.

Like a scene out of an Alfred Hitchcock movie, birds are crashing into windows at alarming rates.

detroitriverfront

Cities are dangerous for migrating birds. Image: Fatal Light Awareness Program


Between 365 million and 988 million birds die annually from window collisions in the U. S. and Canada, according to a recent study.
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Jan. 29, 2016 Budget

Capital News Service Budget – Week 2

Jan. 29, 2016

To: CNS Editors

From: David Poulson and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/. For technical problems, contact CNS tech manager Tanya Voloshina (248-943-8979) voloshin@msu.edu.

You can email us at cnsmsu@gmail.com

Here’s your file:

HISTORIC: Some state lawmakers are seeking to give people living in historic districts a bigger say on regulations that determine what they can do to their homes. There are 78 historic districts in Michigan including ones in Cadillac, Grand Rapids, Holland, Manistee, Three Rivers and Traverse City. A list is on the Michigan State Housing Development website http://www.michigan.gov/mshda/0,4641,7-141-54317_19320_62049_62050-57490–,00.html. By Jasmine Watts. FOR CADILLAC, GRAND RAPIDS, BUSINESS HOLLAND, MANISTEE, THREE RIVERS, STURGIS, LUDINGTON, TRAVERSE CITY AND ALL POINTS.

SYRIANREFUGEES: Michigan nonprofit organizations are preparing for an influx of Syrian refugees after the U.S. Senate declined to approve a bill to bar them from the country. That includes  meeting with refugees and community members to dispel misconceptions. About 11 Michigan communities and counties are working on their  resettlement, including Lansing, Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo County, Detroit and Clinton County. By Edara Rohitha. For CITY PULSE, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS

JUVENILELIFERS: About 350 Michigan inmates serving life sentences for crimes committed as juveniles could get a chance at parole under a U.S. Supreme Court ruling.  The recent ruling came too late for one inmate from Gaylord convicted in 1988 of murdering a Cheboygan man and who killed himself when he thought parole impossible, according to a  friend. We hear from the Lake County prosecutor, Corrections Department and Attorney General’s office. from By Jason Kraft. For CHEBOYGAN, LAKE COUNTY, LUDINGTON, MANISTEE, CITY PULSE, PETOSKEY AND ALL POINTS

ABORTIONFUNDING:  Some  lawmakers are trying to transform last year’s ban on state funding for abortion providers into a state law permanently preventing it. We hear from Right to Life, Planned Parenthood and a Byron Center lawmaker By Joshua Bender. FOR HOLLAND, CITY PULSE AND ALL POINTS

ENVIRONMENTALJUSTICE: Flint’s water crisis and Detroit’s air quality problems both represent environmental challenges faced by low-income urban communities with large minority populations, some experts say. We hear from the Sierra Club, an MSU engineering professor and Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice. By Courtney Bourgoin. FOR LANSING CITY PULSE & ALL POINTS.

PASTUREDPOULTRY: Poultry farmers are increasingly raising chickens, turkeys, ducks and geese in environmentally greener and healthier habitats, with lower fuel and fertilizer costs and vet bills, the American Pastured Poultry Producers Association says. Among them is Corinne Carpenter of Webberville. An MSU report says the Salatin system of moveable cages for pastured poultry is inexpensive For agriculture and news pages: Top-producing counties include Allegan, Oceana, St. Joseph, Montcalm, Mecosta and Ingham. By Kelly vanFrankenhuyzen. FOR HOLLAND, GREENVILLE, BIG RAPIDS, LUDINGTON, STURGIS, THREE RIVERS, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, LANSING CITY PULSE & ALL POINTS.

            w/PASTUREDPOULTRY1: Salatin tractor for meat birds. Credit: Caitlin Carpenter.

            w/PASTUREDPOULTRY2: The Isa Brown breed is known for brown eggs. Credit: Caitlin Carpenter.

            w/PASTUREDPOULTRYTABLE: Top 10 poultry-producing counties in Michigan. Credit: National Agricultural Statistics Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.

DOGSHOT: A federal judge has cleared the way for the owners of a dog shot by a Corrections Department investigator to collect emotional distress, mental anguish and punitive damages from the state if they win at a jury trial scheduled to begin Feb. 16. The investigator went to the wrong house in Flint in search of a fugitive when he shot Clohe, a 15-year-old pit bull mix in the face. She lost part of her tongue and tooth and underwent three operations. By Eric Freedman. FOR ALL POINTS

 

Michigan prepares for Syrian refugees

By ROHITHA EDARA
Capital News Service

LANSING — Michigan nonprofit organizations are preparing for an influx of Syrian refugees after the U.S. Senate rejected a bill that would stop them from entering the country.

“We are expecting a new wave of refugees, especially that of Syrians,” said Ken Fouty, community outreach coordinator at Lutheran Social Services of Michigan based in Detroit. “We anticipate that it will happen in the summer.”

About 100 Syrian refugees were resettled by his organization in 2015. It is prepared to take about 300 more in response to the refugee crisis in Syria, he said.
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Lawmakers seek to ease restrictions on historic districts

By JASMINE WATTS
Capital News Service

LANSING— State lawmakers are pushing to change a law that preserves historic districts so that residents will have a greater say in how they can modify their homes.

A coupleof  Republican legislators want to rewrite the 45-year-old Historic Districts Act so that the people it affects will be able to modify their homes without being easily denied by the historic preservation committees in charge of them.

Historic districts are areas with buildings deemed significant to a city’s cultural history. They allow communities to preserve the richness of the past, while providing continuity for the present and future, according to the National Trust for Historic Preservation.
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