22-year-old WMU student Colin Sytsma shoots his AR-15 rifle.

Gun sales for 2016 to topple previous year’s record

American gun company shares are down, but gun sales are up amidst election scares and Black Friday sales. After Donald Trump defeated Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election, popular handgun manufacturer Smith & Wesson saw a 25 percent decrease in their share price in just two days. Similarly, .22 caliber firearm giant, Ruger fell from from a high of $64.40 a share to just $47.50 a share in the same amount of time. This plunge was the result of the end of a period of pre-election uncertainty.  

Market instability is common for unpredictable presidential election years.

Donald Trump does not state how long it will take to build up the Army. The projection is not based on a specific timescale.

How Clinton and Trump stack up as commander-in-chief

With the election coming to a close on Nov. 8, not only will the nation choose the new president, but the new commander-in-chief as well. Donald Trump has made some clear numerical statements as to what his plans will be as the leader of the armed forces, while Hillary Clinton has made some more qualitative statements. Trump has stated that he will increase the size of the U.S. Army to 540,000 active personnel from roughly 473,000. This surge of troops will restore the Army’s size to a level similar to its size back in 2008, the year directly following an armed forces “surge” in Iraq.

Fenton resident Patrice Katrak holds her homemade sign at the Bernie Sanders rally. Katrak said she supported Sanders in the primary and is now unsure if she will vote for Hillary Clinton or a third party candidate. 
Photo/McKenna Ross

At Clinton rally, Sanders supporters weigh pros and cons

Sen. Bernie Sanders spoke at Michigan State University on behalf of the Hillary Clinton presidential campaign. I spoke to Sanders supporters on their feelings on Clinton, Sanders and the Nov. 8 election. [View the story “Sen. Bernie Sanders speaks at MSU on behalf of Clinton campaign” on Storify]

MSU student Joseph Titus, 21, relaxes on his couch after a long day of class. Titus is not registered to vote in the upcoming election and it has a lot to do with his upbringing.

For this MSU student, lack of voting didn’t skip a generation

By Nathaniel Bott

Ann Arbor native and MSU senior Joseph Titus, 21, goes about his busy day with no time to think about politics. He takes his studies and homework to the MSU library or Union, takes to the gridiron in intramural football leagues and plays beer pong with his roommates while tailgating a Spartan football game. According to Circle statistics, an organization that examines youth voting in the United States, Titus is also among the 49.6 percent of people in the state of Michigan from ages 18-29 who didn’t vote in the 2012 presidential election. Only 14.8 percent of people ages 18-29 voted in the 2014 midterm, and Titus wasn’t one of them either. As far as Titus knows, His parents and his 25-year-old sister don’t vote.