Rates for some crimes fall in Lansing, but it doesn’t feel that way to all

By Alana Easterling
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

Some things are just not adding up: when it comes to crime, Lansing residents are saying one thing, while data is saying another. Crime rate data for Lansing displays a decrease in some crime rates, but some Lansing residents feel that crimes rates haven’t decreased, but have gotten worse. Lansing crime rate data shows that the crime rates in Lansing have fluctuated since 2002, but they have indeed decreased since then as well. In 2007 there were 14.1 murders for every 100,000 residents, and just six years later in 2013, that rated decreased by half to 7 murders for every 100,000 residents. Though statistics and those behind the scenes say crime has decreased, some Lansing residents feel otherwise.

Low crime rates contribute to Meridian's quality of life

By Chris Hung
The Meridian Times Staff Reporter

Despite having slightly above average violent crime rates compared to townships of similar population, Meridian Township residents report above average living conditions and quality of life. In the 2015 National Citizen Survey on Meridian Township, in which 331 residents were polled, 98 percent of respondents reported feeling safe in the neighborhoods. In downtown or commercial areas, 96 percent of residents felt safe. 92 percent of residents responded that their overall security was rated positively. An integral part to the township’s safety and security are the 39 sworn officers that make up both Meridian’s police force.

Lansing Township keeping a wary eye on neighboring Lansing’s crime rate

By Grant Essenmacher
Lansing Township News Staff Reporter

Lansing Township has been affected by the high crime rates of neighboring Lansing for years. That continues to be the case nowadays, and is a problem that the township must deal with. In 2014, the crime rate in Lansing was 44 percent higher than the national average according to areavibes, a service that provides demographics for cities. For Lansing Township citizen Brian Watkins, the crimes surrounding the area is a major issue. “I think anytime you are discussing crime, especially in a suburb of a bigger city it’s an issue.” Watkins said.

Prostitution more of a local issue than just Stuart Dunnings III allegations

By Zachary Barnes, Emily Elconin and Sakiya Duncan
Old Town Lansing Times Staff Reporters

A secret rose to the surface after Detective Amber Kenny-Hinojosa was investigating Tyrone Smith for involvement with human trafficking activities. This investigation led to the discovery of a case that involves Ingham County Prosecuting Attorney Stuart Dunnings III who is facing 15 charges across three counties, including Ingham County, for allegedly engaging in prostitution. The problem, though, is far more than just of an alleged rogue prosecutor. There were 381 commercialized sex/prostitution offenses reported in 2014 in the state of Michigan according to Michigan Incident Crime Reporting database. In 2013 and 2014, 12 men and 15 women were arrested for such crimes in Lansing.

In the shadow of Kalamazoo, police hope to keep Grand Ledge safe

By Madison Morse
Living in the Ledge Staff Reporter

An act of violence can occur at any moment, place or time. This became all too real on Feb. 20 when a mass shooting in Kalamazoo left six people dead and two injured. This tragedy has the community of Grand Ledge
buckling down to stay one of the safest cities in Michigan. “We can take a lot of information from the shootings,” said Lt. Chris Blievernicht of the Grand Ledge Police Department.

Two recent bank robberies were two rarities for the area

By Stevie Pipis
Holt Journal Staff Reporter

Bank robberies are pretty rare in Mid-Michigan in the first place. Last month, that rare event happened twice. And on the same day. The two banks were the FirstMerit Bank in Delhi Township and Comerica Bank in Lansing, both on Cedar Road and both robbed on the morning of Feb. 20.

Community Center suffered minor damaged after break in

Caitlin DeLuca
The Williamston Post

The Williamston Community Center suffered another break in last week. The building was illegally accessed between the hours of 4:30 p.m. and 9:30 a.m. on Feb. 21-22. The Williamston Community Center is home to the senior center, the library and a food bank. According to the police report, those that broke in damaged doors and security gates and stole a 1949 Williamston High School senior composite.

Parents, beware: prescription drug abuse comes to DeWitt

By Shane Jones
The Bath-DeWitt Connection Staff Reporter

DEWITT — In the quiet town of DeWitt, there is not too much to talk about. Upon your first glance the small city of DeWitt looks just like every small city. A very calming place, with trees, parks, and houses that sit way back on driveways as long as a football field. But, just like everywhere else in the world, there is crime. Flash back to last month when three Michigan residents were arrested for prescription drug abuse.

Credit card fraud an ongoing problem locally, nationally

By Xin Wen
Ingham County Chronicle Staff Reporter

Ten percent of Americans have been victims of credit card fraud, according to the Statistic Brain Web. Some of those victims are from Ingham County. “I have twice” been a victim, Ted Johnson, a bus driver, said. Johnson said he got the verification from his bank first, but he did not report it to the police. Thomas Holt, an assistant professor in the School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University, said fraud can manifest itself in different ways.

Alert system at Michigan State University makes students more aware of East Lansing crime

By Tori Zackery
Entirely East Lansing

When a crime occurs on or near Michigan State University’s campus, the university issues an alert to more 50,000 people

During the 2015-2016 school year, a local Pizza Hut, apartment complex and MSU residence hall were among establishments in the East Lansing area victim to armed robbery. Each incident prompted a message alert to be sent to the phones and emails of students and faculty, including accounting freshman Alonja Wilson.  

“I feel like I get these alerts once a week,” said Wilson. The MSU Police Department is mandated by the Clery Act, a consumer protection law passed in 1990, to make students, faculty and the public aware of crime occurring on campus. Part of this requirement includes issuing timely warnings and notifications in potential emergency situations.