School sports programs focus on safety as participation in football dips

Spurred in part by fears about contact sports and concussions, state and national youth sports programs are pushing new strategies to protect student-athletes from injury. Those strategies include encourage athletes to participate in more than one sport and putting new rules in place to reduce contact between students and better respond to athletes who suffer concussions. Officials from the Michigan High School Athletic Association are among those advocating for students to play multiple sports. Advocates say that can reduce the chance of repetitive injuries. According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, 45 percent of all athletes specialize in just one sport.

Lacrosse sticks hang on display in a sporting goods store.

Game rules remain different for women, men in some sports, raising gender equality questions

Regardless of the gender of the player of the field, lacrosse is a physical game. But the rule book for men’s and women’s teams differ — one of several examples of sports that create different rules of play based on gender. Some lacrosse players think it’s time for that to change. “In my mind it is a bit sexist,” Ryleigh McGregor, a women’s club lacrosse player at Michigan State University. Unlike hockey, where players on men’s and women’s can have full contact, lacrosse has different rules for contact for men and women players.

Nonprofit organizations serve purpose in every community, including Holt

By Roya Burton
Holt Journal Staff Reporter

HOLT — Rainbow Homes which is located off of Adelpha Avenue is a Christian nonprofit housing corporation that supports living for adults with cognitive and physical disabilities. It is currently one of many nonprofit organizations in Holt.

The Christian nonprofit was originally opened up to people who wanted a place for their children, and didn’t want them living independently. Danielle Miller who is currently employed by Rainbow Homes expressed how she has always been passionate about working with people with disabilities. “I lived in a place similar to Rainbow Homes before I started working here, the fact that it was a nonprofit meant a lot,” said Miller. The function of a community would not be possible without its nonprofit sector.

Delhi Parks and Recreation made for children of all income

By Roya Burton
Holt Journal Staff Reporter

Delhi Parks and Recreation programs continues offer not only various seasonal sports and activities to children of all skill levels, but opportunities for children of different household incomes. Recreation Coordinator Tim Tilma knows just how important it is for any child to be able to participate in local recreation programs.

“We welcome children and families of all incomes a waived fee. We want everyone to get the opportunity to get out there and experience different sports and activities; the affordable prices benefit everyone,” said Tilma. The recreational fee is just $25 per child, however families with multiple children or families who may not be able to afford it, the fee is waived. While in the age of iPads and iPhones, parks and recreation programs are more crucial than ever. According to The State of Obesity 14.7 percent of 10- to 17-year-olds and 13.2 percent of two- to four-year-olds from low-income families are obese in the state of Michigan.

Holt Road reconstruction project OKd by township, scheduled for this fall

By Roya Burton and Jalen Smith
Holt Journal Staff Reporters

In order to improve traffic circulation on Holt Road between Grovenburg Road and Aurelius Road, Delhi Township officials have approved plans to resurface and repave that 3.1 mile stretch of road this fall. Throughout Holt Road west of Eifert Road to Aurelius Road, and Grovenburg Road four-lane segments will soon be converted to three lanes, with a lane going each direction, and the middle designated as a left-turn lane. The proposed project will also stretch down to Holt High School on the intersections of Washington and Eifert. They will replace the three light traffic signal with a traffic light that includes a left hand arrow. At the beginning or end of a school day turning left or right out of the high school is difficult when the when the traffic is the most congested.

Curriculum educates youth on decision-making and drug abuse

By Roya Burton
Holt Journal Staff Reporter

Ingham County has seen a gradual increase in drug arrests since 2014. According to statistics collected by the Michigan State Police, 67 percent of all drug arrest in Ingham County were marijuana-related. And the illicit drug is most commonly seen around young age groups. In a 2015 survey, statistics revealed that 15 percent of all eighth-graders and 44 percent of 12th-graders have been exposed to the drug at least once in their lifetime, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Hope Middle School has taken a different approach to educate their students.

Arrest of Ingham Country prosecutor shows that sex crimes know no boundaries

By Anna Shaffer, Roya Burton, Jalen Smith, and Stevie Pipis
Holt Journal Staff Reporters

While the arrest of Ingham County Prosecutor came as a shock to most residents, it shed light on the harsh reality that sex crimes do happen in Mid-Michigan and that a stereotypical criminal isn’t always the suspect. Dunnings was arrested on March 14 after a year-long investigation. He is facing charges for a total of 15 criminal counts including pandering, engaging in the services of prostitution, and willful neglect of duty, according to a press release issued by the State of Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette. The arrest has gained widespread attention, partly due to Dunnings being an outspoken advocate for ending human trafficking and prostitution. And these crimes have hit close to home for many local residents regarding a problem many didn’t realize was there.

Home is where your corner bar is

By Roya Burton
Holt Journal Staff Reporter

Ron Heady remembers the first time he stepped into what is now known as Darb’s Crystal Bar. What was originally known as “Crystals” in the mid 1970s would later be bought by the Darbis family, and restored into what it is today. Even then he knew it was someplace special, that you couldn’t find just anywhere.  

“When I was a little boy my Dad and I would come to this bar. I remember him giving me change for pinball and I would just come and sit while he played cards with the boys,” said Heady.

Holt offers low-income families a crack at farmer's market products

By Roya Burton
Holt Journal Staff Reporter

Fresh is the word many of us like to hear when it comes to our nutrition. Questions of our food being organic or processed can be a frequent concern. However, no matter how you like your food, many of us can rely on our local farmers markets to supply locally-owned and grown produce year round. In Holt, that includes low-income customers. The Holt Farmers Market, which is owned and operated by the Delhi Downtown Development Authority (DDA), has been supplying local residents of every income the last couple of years.