More than 40 years after the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision, abortion remains a hot-button political topic in the United States. According to a March 2016 survey by the Pew Research Center, 56 percent of U.S. adults think abortion should be legal in all or most cases while 41 percent say it should be illegal all or most of the time.

Abortion remains key issue 40 years after Roe v. Wade

More than 40 years after the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision, abortion remains a hot-button political topic in the United States. According to a March 2016 survey by the Pew Research Center, 56 percent of U.S. adults think abortion should be legal in all or most cases while 41 percent say it should be illegal all or most of the time. But despite attention on the topic, American’s views haven’t shifted in the 10 years Pew has surveyed on the topic.

“Whether we realize it or not we have so much political power in general. I always say how we are living history,” says Daniel Eggerding, a member of the Michigan State University College Democrats. “Right now is history in the making and we’re on the verge for electing the first female president. The millennial generation has become the largest demographic of electorate in American politics. We have more power than any other group."

Student activists add to campus dialogue

Daniel Eggerding says his proudest moment is when he was at a Donald Trump rally in Grand Rapids this year. He got up on his best friend’s shoulders and screamed as Trump walked onto the stage: “You’re a racist bigot!”

With a campus of more than 50,000 students, Michigan State University students have a diverse set of viewpoints. And with more than 600 registered student organizations, there may be a student group to cover most of those views. “What’s so important is getting people organized and having people out who want to see that change happen,” said Joseph Herbst, secretary for Greenpeace and director of grassroots organizing activism for The Climate Reality project. Claire Bogrow is the president of Greenpeace at Michigan State.

First-year Michigan State University osteopathic medicine student Heba Osman poses for a portrait on April 9, 2016, at the Islamic Center of East Lansing. Osman says that her personal choice to wear the hijab makes her feel powerful.

Muslim medical students take pride in wearing hijab

For many Muslim women, a hijab is more than a simple headscarf. It’s a representation of their faith and a point of pride. “For me, the hijab exemplifies your inner beauty rather than your outer beauty,” said Heba Osman, an Osteopathic medicine student at Michigan State University. The fact that I have the choice to put the hijab on makes me feel more powerful.” “It’s my choice to put it on every day.

Tensions rise as unregulated medical marijuana dispensaries continue to grow in Lansing

By Emily Elconin
Old Town Lansing Times Staff Reporter

Co-owners Brian Hamilton and Ronnie Sartain of Puff N’ Stuff dispensary located at 229 W. Grand River Ave. in Old Town share a passion for the legalization of medical marijuana. After sustaining personal injuries from a motorcycle accident and a broken ankle, Hamilton and Sartain made a decision to stop using opiates to alleviate pain and start using cannabis as an alternative painkiller. Although medical marijuana is considered by some experts to be a viable alternative to traditional painkillers, tensions continue to rise in Lansing regarding a new ordinance that addresses regulation and zoning for medical marijuana facilities. As dispensaries surrounding the outskirts of Old Town still remain unregulated, the amount of dispensaries open raises concern for public safety in the community.

Creative energy in Old Town is fueling growth for community

By Emily Elconin
Old Town Lansing Times Staff Reporter

From the beginning, the neighborhood of Old Town has been a creative, kooky, and eccentric place that vibrates with a colorful and inviting energy. From the moment you walk down Turner Street, it is evident there is a new chapter being written here in Old Town. There is a story to be shared on every corner. As Old Town continues to grow, so do the people who are helping Old Town come back stronger than ever before. Old Town is in the process of planning exciting summer festivals and a new event called Arts Night Out, where four neighborhoods in Lansing including Old Town, East Lansing,REO Town, and Downtown Lansing will feature all different kinds of art to draw in the younger community and help the arts community thrive all over Lansing, beginning in Old Town.

Elderly Instruments helps develop sense of community and arts culture in Old Town

By Emily Elconin
Old Town Lansing Times Staff Reporter

The arts play an important role in small neighborhood of Old Town. Elderly Instruments located at 1100 N. Washington Ave., plays a significant role in the development of the arts culture in Old Town. The power of art and music has helped create a sense of community for people in Old Town and people who are just visiting or passing through. “Elderly has been a staple and anchor here in Old Town which has been really important because they’ve been here for a really long time,” Program Director for Michigan Institute of Contemporary Art Katrina Daniels said. “They are a really important cornerstone here in Old Town.

A DeWitt chiropractor makes his office a family affair

By Emily Elconin
Clinton County Chatter Staff Reporter

DEWITT — For Dr. Randy Chambers, there isn’t much difference between work and home. After all, he sees his family all day at 203 S. Bridge St., where Chambers runs Chambers Chiropractic & Nutritional Healing Center. His wife Rebecca Chambers, daughter Austin Chambers, 4, and dog Ginger all join him at work there. “It allows us to spend time with our kids and work at the same time. It’s important to us that we are able to spend as much time with our kids as possible.

Small-town pharmacies battling mail-order competition in Clinton County

By Emily Elconin
Clinton County Chatter Staff Reporter

Small-town pharmacies like Hometown Pharmacy located at 128 S. Bridge St. in DeWitt are facing challenges with demand from growing mail-order pharmacies and larger insurance companies. In the process, face-to-face consultations between pharmacists and patients are being replaced with a technology-based service that eliminates any personal connections. But proponents of the change claim an ability to provide drugs at cheaper costs, something one study did not agree with. “What I’ve been told is that it’s a claim that’s it’s cheaper for the insurance companies to go mail-order,” Patty Wagner, pharmacy manager at Hometown Pharmacy said.

Health Performance Institute goes beyond the gym to create a healthier community

By Emily Elconin
Clinton County Chatter Staff Reporter

DEWITT — Making healthy choices and staying physically active is a constant battle in today’s society. Michigan now has the 17th-highest adult obesity rate in the nation, according The State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America. Inside Clinton County, a team of supportive and encouraging trainers at The Human Performance Institute, a personal training studio located in downtown DeWitt are partnering with local restaurants in the community to promote healthy living beyond its fitness center. It is teaming up with different restaurants to implement healthier options including Relli’s Italian Restaurant and Lansing Brewing Company in DeWitt and even an Austin, Texas-based company called Onnit that focuses on the sale of health and nutrition-related products including supplements, foods, and fitness equipment. “It’s unique for a training studio to partner with other restaurants,” said institute founder Justin Hartig.

Growing use of The Basic Needs Center points to Clinton County poverty

By Emily Elconin
Clinton County Chatter Staff Reporter

For the families in Clinton County who have nowhere else to turn, The Basic Needs Center is there to provide food, clothes, and other vital necessities for a basic household.  Married couple Adele MacCoy and Pastor Russ MacCoy started this non-profit organization six years ago out of their compassion for helping people in their community. “When we first just started out, we only thought we would be helping about 100 families.  Now, we’re up to 1,666 families over the course of six years,” Adele MacCoy said. The Basic Needs Center is located at 105 N. Clinton Ave. in St. Johns.