In 2013, an infographic titled “Teachers Don’t Work Hard Enough? Think Again!” created by BusyTeacher.org made waves when it suggested the “real teaching day” encompasses more than class time. In total, the infographic estimates the teaching day to be 12 to 16 hours in length.

Unpaid overtime and the social expectation for teachers

In 2013, an infographic titled “Teachers Don’t Work Hard Enough? Think Again!” created by BusyTeacher.org made waves when it suggested the “real teaching day” encompasses more than class time. In total, the infographic estimates the teaching day to be 12 to 16 hours in length. The graphic attributes eight hours per day to standard teaching time, one hour to helping students outside of school, and three to five hours to planning, grading, answering emails and attending regular meetings. According to Katie Huber-Welty, an elementary school teacher at Three Fires Elementary in the Howell Public School District, and Merlinda Emerson, a retired principal with 26 years of teaching experience in the East Lansing Public School District, these numbers are accurate.

MSU senior fuses education and social relations

Abigail Harrington is a senior at Michigan State University. After studying social relations and policy at James Madison College, she decided to add education to her list of majors. In October, I was given the opportunity to speak with Abigail to discuss her story and her future plans as a potential educator. Read Abigail’s thoughts on unpaid teaching hours in Unpaid overtime and the social expectation for teachers. CB: Let’s start with the story.

With the continual increase of online education offerings, teachers must tackle the inevitable: transferring a traditionally face-to-face course to the internet. Photo Credit: Pixabay.com

Translating education from the classroom to the internet

A 2017 study from Inside Higher Education showed online teaching is gaining popularity. In 2013, just 30 percent of respondents reported they taught an online course. This year, 42 percent reported teaching an online course. With the continual increase of online education offerings, teachers must tackle the inevitable: Transferring a traditional face-to-face course to the internet. From the teacher’s side of the screen

“The first time I taught a course with an online component was before the World Wide Web existed,” said Professor William Hart-Davidson, an associate professor and associate dean of graduate studies in MSU’s College of Arts and Letters.

Dr. Patricia Edwards is a professor of education at Michigan State University. She accepted her role as a teacher at a young age, and now teaches college students at various points throughout their education.

MSU professor of education shares advice, experience

Dr. Patricia Edwards is a professor of education at Michigan State University. She accepted her role as a teacher at a young age, and, now, teaches college students who go on to teach. In October, I was given the opportunity to speak with Edwards to discuss her experience as a professor and the future of educators. Read Dr. Edwards’ thoughts on teachers choosing school districts here. CB: How did you choose your career?

Nearly two decades after a published study showed teachers factor in proximity to their hometown, job availability and district financial resources before choosing a school district, the results hold true, according to a handful of teachers in Michigan, Oklahoma and Virginia.

Why teachers choose and stay at their school district

Nearly two decades after a published study showed teachers factor in proximity to their hometown, job availability and district financial resources before choosing a school district, the results hold true, according to a handful of teachers in Michigan, Oklahoma and Virginia. In the early 2000s, Harvard Professor Susan Moore Johnson and Doctoral Student Sarah E. Birkeland set out to discover why teachers choose certain districts to begin their careers. After following 50 teachers for four years, Johnson and Birkeland found several factors were important, including basic support and respect from administration, opportunities to work with other professionals, the ability to improve skills and general school culture. These findings from Massachusetts underscore trends still present today. Returning home

For Katie Alsup, a seventh-grade geography teacher at Belle Isle Enterprise Middle School in the Oklahoma City Public School District, choosing a school was as simple as going home.

Residents, employees and business owners share their view of Lansing’s future

Every city has its stakeholders – men, women and children who want to see the community grow, businesses thrive, education improve and popularity skyrocket. The collective viewpoint of these individuals in the City of Lansing could determine the future of Michigan’s capital city. Ariniko O’Meara – Vice President of the REO Town Commercial Association

Ariniko O’Meara is no stranger to the Lansing area. She spends much of her time in REO Town, a Lansing district in the middle of an impressive comeback. “I was born and raised in Lansing until I was 22,” she said.

Some local college students steer clear of City of Lansing; why?

Do local college students spend a significant amount of time in the City of Lansing? It depends on who you ask. “I commuted to and from LCC (Lansing Community College) but never stopped and visited the City of Lansing,” said Sarah Baylis, a Michigan State University transfer student. “As an MSU student, I stay in the East Lansing area.” Baylis attended LCC for two years before transferring to MSU.

Outdoor recreation thrives in the City of Lansing

Ask a resident or visitor about recreational activities in the City of Lansing. You’ll likely hear more than you expected. Lansing is home to numerous parks, bodies of water and non-motorized trails, making it a popular place for outdoor recreational activities during all seasons. One commonly visited park is Hawk Island Park, located on Cavanaugh Road. At Hawk Island Park, visitors can rent rowboats and peddle boats, swim on the beach, enjoy picnic areas and splash parks, play horseshoes or snow tube in the winter.

Flea market, antique stores continue to flourish in Lansing

In the City of Lansing, residents can find numerous flea market and antique stores, including Capitol City Pickers Vintage Marketplace, Dicker & Deal Second Hand Store, The Mega Mall and Vintage Junkies. Each of these stores has something in common – they cater to the same community. “When it comes to flea markets and antique stores, you can find different types of consumers,” said Ayalla Ruvio, an assistant professor of marketing at Michigan State University. “There are the ones that are generally interested in antiques. There are those people that do it for professional reasons.

REO Town community finds its post-industrial place in the world

 

REO Town, a Lansing district located south of downtown, is considered the United States birthplace of the commercial automobile. The district is named after Ransom Eli Olds, an entrepreneur who founded the REO Motor Car Company in 1905. From 1905 to 1975, a major manufacturing plant for the REO Motor Car Company was located in REO Town. The plant gave a significant financial boost to the district, supplying both jobs and outside interest. Since production ceased in 1975, the automotive industry has remained the major employer in REO Town, with more than 2,000 workers employed by the Lansing Grand River Assembly plant.