Lansing Township makes recovery from wind storm

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National Weather Service released graphics identifying the areas under a wind advisory. Graphic courtesy of National Weather Service

The tumultuous windstorm that swept through Michigan on March 8 left Susan Flores feeling as if it was ‘just a normal day.” But her workplace’s neighbors may beg to differ.

“The whole strip with Little Caesars, McDonald’s and all the way down to Taco Bell lost power,” said Flores, who works at the Subway located on the corner of Saginaw Highway and Waverly Road. “Our restaurant was okay and it hasn’t impacted us so far … It was just a normal day.”

At the storm’s peak, there were more than 20,000 outages in the area, according to Board of Water & Light.

Board of Water & Light provided updates throughout the storm on the number of customers without power. Image by Madison Job

Board of Water & Light provided updates throughout the storm on the number of customers without power.
Image by Madison Job

Board of Water & Light provided updates throughout the storm on the number of customers without power. Image by Madison Job

Board of Water & Light provided updates throughout the storm on the number of customers without power.
Image by Madison Job

BWL Spokeswoman Amy Adamy said that BWL worked to restore the critical outages first in hospitals, water pumping facilities, police and fire departments.

“From there, we started with bringing restoration to lines that would restore a couple thousand customers power at a time,” Adamy said. “We also have a resource center on our website that allows residents to report their outages.”

Full restoration for BWL was reached on the evening of Saturday, March 11.

Katie Carey who is the director of media relations for Consumers Energy said that their customers’ power was out for just over two days.

“We don’t have a ton of customers in Lansing Township,” Carey said. “But 890 of them were restored on Friday, March 10 at 12:30 p.m.”

Nation Weather Service released graphics identifying the areas under a wind advisory. Graphic courtesy of Nation Weather Service

Nation Weather Service released graphics identifying the areas under a wind advisory.
Graphic courtesy of Nation Weather Service

Information provided by the National Weather Service confirmed the high wind event was a result of a strong low pressure system over the Hudson Bay bringing a cold front across the area.

NWS stated, “The colder air being brought in combined with sunshine allowed for surface heating to occur clear skies allowed for the sun to heat the surface which served to deepen the mixed layer.”

Jim Geyer, who is a meteorologist at WLNS-TV, said the storm was not rooted in climate change or climate.

“This was not a ‘normal’ event. For many people, this will be a once-in-a-lifetime event,” Geyer said. “It is also NOT due to our climate or climate change. This was a meteorological event, not climatological.”