Adult coloring sales still booming as it helps people therapeutically

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Mason Public Library holds it monthly adult coloring night.

Mason Public Library holds it monthly adult coloring night.

Coloring is no longer just for kids.  Adult coloring, which once seemed unorthodox, is still an ongoing trend.  Sales for adult coloring books are in the millions of dollars and one reason might be because it has been shown to help people therapeutically.

Mason Public Library held its monthly adult coloring night on Oct 13, and it was packed for such a small library.  This event brought out nine people of an older crowd and they enjoyed tea and hot cocoa as they colored the night away.

Joann DePeel, a 67 year old woman who came out to the event said, “I love coloring.  I used to do it when I was younger.  My husband is going through chemotherapy, so it’s something I can focus on and it’s relaxing.  When he’s doing chemotherapy I can do this because people keep coming in and out.  It’s something I can do and I can stop if somebody has to ask me questions.  I think it’s very cathartic and I really enjoy it.”

Joann DePeel and Judy Fogle coloring their sheets and talking.

Joann DePeel and Judy Fogle coloring their sheets and talking.

DePeel said, “I was showing my sons some coloring I did and they were like ‘You did that mom?  That’s really cool.  How did you pick out the colors?’  They were just shocked that I could do it.  In fact, my one son was doing it as well.”

“I think sales are high because coloring brings the inner child out.  You can go anywhere now and find a coloring book.  My husband was reading in the paper that the sales of coloring books have more than quadrupled since last year,” said DePeel.

Kayla Castro, a senior at Michigan State University studying psychology said, “Adult coloring is really fun.  I do it in my spare time to help myself relax and release some stress that school causes me to have.  I think people are starting to do it because it is therapeutic for the older people that have a lot to worry about.”

Adult coloring books

Adult coloring books


Castro said, “When you’re a kid, you don’t have to worry about paying bills, supporting a family, getting through a week of miserable college finals, or anything at all for that matter.  When kids color, it is simply for fun and to show their creativity.  When adults color, it is more to help them relax and stay sane.  It has been shown to help improve people’s’ health.  I know for a fact it helps me.”

Judy Fogle, a Mason local who used to work at Michigan State, said “I’m working on giving this out to young people.  I volunteer at a home for young mothers 13 to 17 in Mason, and I bring these sheets to them.  It’s to help calm them and soothe them because a lot of girls have been neglected or have post-traumatic stress disorder.  I encourage them to color and it’s amazing to watch the creativity of the young people.  It’s something for them to do besides being angry.”

A postcard that was colored at the event.

A postcard that was colored at the event.

“A lot of adults today are now coloring.  I almost call it the ‘new adults’ because we can do things now that we didn’t do when we were 40,” said Fogle who is 67 years old.

Fogle said, “Everybody wanted adult coloring books and when I started seeing them and buying them, there was a waiting list for them.  Two years ago they weren’t available, and now they’re everywhere.  I’ve seen calendars, postcards, and I wouldn’t be surprised if they have greeting cards you can color now.”

Katie Phillips, one of the youngest women who attended at 38, came with her mother and said, “I think adults like to color because everyone has an inner child.  My mother is 79 years young and she hardly ever concentrates on things.  She doesn’t get out much or move around a lot, but she likes this coloring.  I don’t know if this trend will continue, but we like it.”

Jim Evans, a Mason local, as he colors in some tropical flowers.

Jim Evans, a Mason local, as he colors in some tropical flowers.

Jim Evans, a Mason resident said “I just like the satisfaction of seeing and creating something.  This is my first time coloring since I was like 10.  I’m pretty sure I colored with crayons when I was young, but some of those memories have faded.”   Jim Evans is now 69 years old.

“We have more time to do things now.  At my age, I can only speak for myself, but I just don’t want to sit at home and be bored.  Plus, I realize life is not getting any longer, so I can’t afford to wait around too much,” said Evans.