Kasich: 2016’s wildcard candidate

Print More

Jeff Litten, chair of MSU College Republicans

Jeff Litten, chair of MSU College Republicans

By Sheena Marvin and Shannon Kelly
MI First Election

Gov. John Kasich won his home state of Ohio on March 15. As a result, Kasich has slowed Donald Trump’s quest for the 1,237 delegates needed to win the Republican nomination outright.

Currently, Kasich has 143 delegates compared to the 681 delegates Donald Trump has and the 425 delegates that Ted Cruz has. Despite the celebration of winning Ohio, there are not enough delegates at stake for any candidate to come out on top in the GOP field ahead of the Republican National Convention this July.

Jeff Litten, Chair of Michigan State University’s College Republicans, had previously organized the Kasich on campus rally on Feb. 15.

“The possibility of Kasich getting the Republican nomination is not likely,” Litten said,“Kasich is a great candidate who has done a lot for Ohio, but it is not plausible for him to win the nomination.”

Kasich would need to secure more than 100 percent of the remaining delegates to secure the nomination without going to a contested convention. Kasich’s team is left with hopes that Trump fails to acquire enough delegates to seal the nomination before the convention.

Though Kasich has a small chance of winning the nomination, he is rapidly gaining the support of Republicans and Democrats alike.

Michigan State University International Relations professor, Kristen Brathwaite is in full support of Kasich’s campaign. Kasich’s track record as governor of compromising to find solutions instead of arguing makes him stand out as the best candidate, Brathwaite said.

Kirstin Brathwaite

Kirstin Brathwaite


“He has not called for committing war crimes, he’s reasonable, and most importantly does not play on the fear of the public,” Brathwaite said.“I appreciate his positive campaign and his track record with compromising on policy in Ohio.”

To Bridget Bush, political theory junior, Kasich’s home-state win barely gives him the chance for the Republican nomination. Kasich has been out of the race for a long time, Trump and Cruz are the only ones with a chance, Bush said.

“I liked him (Kasich) a lot more after the rally. He seemed genuine and honest in the way he spoke, but I’m a Trump supporter,” said Bush.“I like how he (Trump) speaks bluntly, he’s the same person now as he was 20 years ago. Trump puts his money where his mouth is.”

Bridget Bush, junior political theory and constitutional democracy major

Bridget Bush, junior political theory and constitutional democracy major


Though Kasich is a likable candidate he doesn’t deserve to win the nomination, Bush said.

“If it went up to the Republican convention they would have to chose Trump for the Republican nomination. He’s consistently won states and I would be fuming with anger if he didn’t win.”said Bush. “He knows how to bring jobs back to America and he’s not a politician and he’s financing his own campaign, so he’s not bought.”

Tyler Silvestri, political theory junior, disagrees with Bush and said he could not be less of a Trump supporter.

Even though he does not agree with the majority of Kasich’s ideas, he can still respect him as a politician,said Silvestri.

Tyler Silvestri, political theory and constitutional democracy major.

Tyler Silvestri, political theory and constitutional democracy major.


“Some of the other candidates like Trump and Sanders think only their views are right,” said Silvestri.“Kasich tends to approach issues with possible solutions rather than only believing his way is right. I respect that and that is what sets him apart from the Republican candidates.”

Donald Trump has won many states throughout his campaign, while Kasich has only won Ohio. Although many may think it would be unfair if Kasich wins the nominee due to the lack of states won, Silvestri thinks this is no problem.

“It’s fair because primary voting is conducive to extreme politics, either way they play on people who come out and vote” Silvestri said.

MSU International students Apoorva Dhingra and John Elias are experiencing American politics for the first time. Though they cannot vote this election, they are staying as involved as possible with the process.

MSU student from India, Apoorva Dhingra.

MSU student from India, Apoorva Dhingra.


“The narrative for the Republican party is still the same and has the same prejudices as it always has in previous elections,” said Dhingra. “I don’t really identify with the Republican party. I support Bernie, I think he’s the best candidate, from my perspective. I don’t know much about Kasich, but he seems better than the other Republican candidates.”

Despite the many losses for Kasich there is a slight chance he could win the Republican nominee. Politics like this and the freedom to vote is what fascinates junior international relations major John Elias.

John Elias, MSU student from Syria.

John Elias, MSU student from Syria.


“Having that freedom is so magnificent about this country,”said Elias. “People in this country take that for granted, that’s why it’s so important to follow politics. If you want to have the right to vote, then vote.”

Comments are closed.