Aiming at pay equity, Lansing continues the My Brother’s Keeper Community Challenge

By Jaylyn Galloway
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

Sometimes, Abdul Conde worries that even by going to school and doing everything he has to do, he will still be behind in pay. “As a young person of color I want to see a change in the wage gap because right now it is unfair,” Conde, a Lansing resident, said. Helping ensure that Conde gets a fair chance is part of the motivation behind the city of Lansing’s participation in President Barack Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper Community Challenge, now in its second year here. “This year for the challenge we are focusing on closing the racial economic gaps in the community,” Angela Waters Austin, the CEO of One Love Global, said. “We have milestones that goes from a person’s birth to their 25th birthday and this helps to come up with strategies to close gaps of young men of color and other beings left behind.”

Milestone include focusing on closing the opportunity gap in getting youths into the workforce and focusing on violence prevention and helping youths have a second chance to talk to law enforcement, according to the news release.

Debate focuses on ways to close women's wage gap

By WEI YU
Capital News Service
LANSING – Wages for Michigan women remain much lower than for men, the American Community Survey for Equal Pay shows. The state ranks 42nd nationally in its gender-based wage gap. According to the survey, women in Michigan earn 74 cents of every dollar earned by men, less than the national average of 77 cents. The wage disparity has not only stalled, it has widened, according to the American Association of University Women. Bills pending in the legislature would help eliminate the disparity, advocates say.