#OurVoteCounts: Getting millennial women registered this election

If every millennial woman voted, there would be a huge voting bloc in this election, said Katherine Mirani, news editor at Her Campus. According to the Center for American Women and Politics, 64 percent of women reported voting in the 2012 election. But of those voters, only 45 percent of women age 18-24 voted, compared to 61 percent of voters age 24-44, 70 percent of voters age 45-64 and 73 percent of voters age 65-74. “We have a lot of power as young women,” said the editor, 24, from Boston, “but we have to actually use it.”

On Sept. 27, Her Campus – a new-media brand for empowered college women based in Boston, Mass.

Millennials "Feel the Bern"

By Danielle Chesney
Entirely East Lansing

Millennial students are creating clubs to show their dedication to Bernie Sanders, such as the #FeelTheBern MSU group at Michigan State University. While older Democrats may favor Hillary Clinton as their prospective presidential candidate, a poll by NBC News in October 2015 shows that millennials are instead “feeling the Bern” with Bernie Sanders. The poll shows that 54 percent of those between the ages of 18 and 30 would choose to elect Sanders, outweighing Clinton’s 26 percent. “I think that millennials, because they’re young, are idealistic,” said Republican Merri Cullen, 60. “It’s probably one of the coolest ages to be, because you’ve got your whole life ahead of you and you haven’t been jaded yet.

Focal Point Fall 2014 [Show 2]

A fire at Chandlers Crossing in East Lansing has displaced dozens of residents. Michigan elections are right around the corner, and voters need to be aware of polling changes. And, Batman and Superman recently made a visit to MSU’s campus. Some students got to be extras in the movie. Focal Point is an Emmy awarding winning, student produced newscast from the School of Journalism at Michigan State University.

Election Day for Young Voters

With the November Election less than a month away, many students are gearing up to vote. Some vote absentee in their home districts, while others choose to vote here in East Lansing. Either way, it can get confusing, especially for first-time voters. For students who plan on voting, East Lansing City Clerk Marie Wicks’ message is simple. “I don’t care where you vote, I care that you vote,” Wicks said.

Proposal would let military, civilians cast electronic absentee ballots

By ANJANA SCHROEDER
Capital News Service
LANSING – A Detroit senator says it should be easier for military and overseas citizens to vote in November after 150 voters received absentee ballots late for the August primaries. But there’s virtually no chance the law will be changed in time for this year’s election. Sen. Coleman Young II, D-Detroit, said he was upset when 70 city and township clerks missed state and federal deadlines to provide military and overseas voters with their absentee ballots in time for the August primaries. Young’s bill would allow overseas military and voters to electronically submit their absentee ballots. He said, “If these brave young men and women are out there for us, it is about time that we stand up for them.”
The bill would also apply to Michigan non-military citizens who are out of the country on Election Day.

Senate approves changes for voter registration

By JON GASKELL
Capital News Service
LANSING — Legislation that would place new restrictions on voter registration has passed the Senate. The bills, aimed at stopping potential voter fraud, would require a photo ID or birth certificate to register to vote. It would also create rules for groups that register voters. Senate Republicans say the measure is necessary to combat voter fraud, but Democrats and some advocacy groups argue it could block voters’ access to the polls. “There is a concern about voter fraud and registration issues,” said Erika Farley, chief of staff to Grand Blanc Republican Sen. David Robertson.