More than a non-registered voter

Marisa Lipcaman, a 20-year-old dietetics major at Michigan State, enjoys dancing and spending time with her friends and family. She minors in dance and is really interested in healthcare. “I feel that we over prescribe and rely on drugs heavily, which often have unpleasant side effects, so I want to use food as medicine,” said Lipcaman. Lipcaman, a junior who lives off campus, said her long-term goal is to work in a private practice and counsel people with clinical illnesses, or anyone that wants to start eating better. When she graduates, she’ll do a one-year internship and then take her exam to become a registered dietician.

Medina Osmanagic: How immigrant status can affect voter identity

Medina Osmanagic is a child of Bosnian immigrants — an identity that has drastically influenced her participation in American politics. “My family is not very Americanized and barely speaks English,” said the junior studying neuroscience and Spanish at Michigan State University. “They feel like they are less than everyone else.”

While her parents have lived in the United States for 19 years – after seeking refuge from the Bosnian War – they continue to hold a strong connection to their home country. This relationship with Bosnia has specifically affected Osmanagic’s willingness to participate in U.S. elections. “My parents have never voted a day in our (family’s) lives, so they never pushed it on us,” said Osmanagic.