Political awareness spreads throughout Okemos High School

Walking into Okemos High School you see the typical high school culture, students exiting the gymnasium, faculty clearing the hallways and lockers closing, but conversation is much more complex than some could ever imagine in class room A207. A diverse group of seniors take their seats, just before the bell rang. Bookbags are settled and lips are sealed. This is the fourth hour AP government senior classroom taught by Danielle Ives. Ives classroom walls is covered by campaign signs from elections decades ago and others that took place last month.

Less religion, more astrology – part II: The stars say you’re a loser

For young people struggling to embrace their identity, online astrology forums can be a safe space. The use of social media has taken astrology to new heights. Quizzes, guides and other articles written around the Zodiac signs tend to be a running theme on young media sites like Buzzfeed, babe and Refinery29, which are widely circulated on social media platforms.

Facebook groups are popular for users interested in a particular topic, and some of the more dedicated groups can foster a sense of community. Enter “the stars say you’re a loser,” one of the largest and most active astrology communities on Facebook. With 7,000+ members and thousands more added each month, it’s hard to believe that it has only been around for a year.

Backpacks and diaper bags: affording student life and parenthood

AUDIO: Full-time student and full-time parent. Being a college student is already expensive, but imagining being a parent as well. With the rising cost of tuition averaging $12,000 a year, housing, books, along with diapers, baby formula and more, it can be financially overwhelming. For some it can seem impossible to live a balance like that. Yet there’s some that can make it work.

More than a non-registered voter

Marisa Lipcaman, a 20-year-old dietetics major at Michigan State, enjoys dancing and spending time with her friends and family. She minors in dance and is really interested in healthcare. “I feel that we over prescribe and rely on drugs heavily, which often have unpleasant side effects, so I want to use food as medicine,” said Lipcaman. Lipcaman, a junior who lives off campus, said her long-term goal is to work in a private practice and counsel people with clinical illnesses, or anyone that wants to start eating better. When she graduates, she’ll do a one-year internship and then take her exam to become a registered dietician.