Grand Ledge looks to keep roads and sidewalks clear through winter

By Madison Morse
Living in the Ledge Staff Reporter

Michigan took another beating this winter, Grand Ledge being no exception. The city has received 23 inches of snow already this calendar year, according to wunderground.com. The snow plows and salt trucks were put to great use this season with back-to-back snowstorms in February. To ensure residents of how soon they can expect their roads to be cleared The City of Grand Ledge has developed a snowfall plan. “We summarized it into the public service announcement flyer for the general public to have a better understanding of our preplanned snow event response,” said Grand Ledge City Administrator, Adam Smith.

County prepares for snowy roads, ice, potential salt shortages

By Cameron Billes
The Ingham County Chronicle

Last winter gave Michigan drivers many problems, including icy roads, potholes and traffic delays. With a few snowstorms already hitting the mitten’s capital and the heart of winter fast approaching, Ingham County residents can only wait and see how the 2014-2015 winter pans out. Due to the heavy amounts of snowfall and ice last winter, Neil Sheridan, president of Bluegrass Lawn and Landscape, says salt could become a hard commodity to get this year. “There is a huge shortage of salt this year so if we do get the same kind of winter we had last year, salt will become a very big issue,” Sheridan said. “Even with county roads and city roads and things like that, people’s budgets just won’t allow them to spend the big money on the salt like they have to.”

Sheridan says the state and county road departments have “locked down” the salt shipments, making it very hard for contractors to get salt of their own.

Ready or not? Residents are stocking up on salt and shovels

By Daniel Hamburg
Mason Times staff writer

At Ace Hardware on Cedar Street, Manager Chris Iott says if you wait too long, it’s too late. That’s the case for hundreds of residents in Mason, who have snow- and ice-covered sidewalks and roadways. Part of the problem is people not adequately prepared, according to Iott. “People will prepare for summer because they know they’re going to have to mow the lawn,” Iott said. “People don’t prepare as much for winter because you may or may not get big snow.