Less religion, more astrology – part II: The stars say you’re a loser

For young people struggling to embrace their identity, online astrology forums can be a safe space. The use of social media has taken astrology to new heights. Quizzes, guides and other articles written around the Zodiac signs tend to be a running theme on young media sites like Buzzfeed, babe and Refinery29, which are widely circulated on social media platforms.

Facebook groups are popular for users interested in a particular topic, and some of the more dedicated groups can foster a sense of community. Enter “the stars say you’re a loser,” one of the largest and most active astrology communities on Facebook. With 7,000+ members and thousands more added each month, it’s hard to believe that it has only been around for a year.

#OurVoteCounts: Getting millennial women registered this election

If every millennial woman voted, there would be a huge voting bloc in this election, said Katherine Mirani, news editor at Her Campus. According to the Center for American Women and Politics, 64 percent of women reported voting in the 2012 election. But of those voters, only 45 percent of women age 18-24 voted, compared to 61 percent of voters age 24-44, 70 percent of voters age 45-64 and 73 percent of voters age 65-74. “We have a lot of power as young women,” said the editor, 24, from Boston, “but we have to actually use it.”

On Sept. 27, Her Campus – a new-media brand for empowered college women based in Boston, Mass.

Old Town could see the effects of the shift back into the urban core

By Zachary Barnes
Old Town Lansing Times Staff Reporter

Old Town is subject to the population shift of millennials moving back into the urban core, after so many years of sprawl, because of its walkability and number of things to do. “What we seem to be observing is that young millennials seem to have different interests and life style choices,” said Rex LaMore, a member of Michigan State University’s Urban and Regional Planning faculty. “They want to be in interesting places where there are a lot of opportunity and things to do. So they are moving back into central cities.” Old Town offers an array of unique festivals, an assortment of different styles of restaurants, and many niche shops as well as shops for basic necessities.

Millennials "Feel the Bern"

By Danielle Chesney
Entirely East Lansing

Millennial students are creating clubs to show their dedication to Bernie Sanders, such as the #FeelTheBern MSU group at Michigan State University. While older Democrats may favor Hillary Clinton as their prospective presidential candidate, a poll by NBC News in October 2015 shows that millennials are instead “feeling the Bern” with Bernie Sanders. The poll shows that 54 percent of those between the ages of 18 and 30 would choose to elect Sanders, outweighing Clinton’s 26 percent. “I think that millennials, because they’re young, are idealistic,” said Republican Merri Cullen, 60. “It’s probably one of the coolest ages to be, because you’ve got your whole life ahead of you and you haven’t been jaded yet.

Millennials face obstacles registering to vote

By Chloe Kiple

EAST LANSING, Mich. – Political disinterest, tricky voting laws and registration processes may stand between millennials and the February 8th deadline to register to vote in the upcoming Michigan presidential primary. “I don’t want to vote in the presidential primary,” said Michigan State senior journalism major Kelsey Banas. “I’m really just not into it, I hate politics.”

Less than 50 percent of millennials, or people ages 18 to 35, say that they will not vote in the presidential primary according to a January 2016 USA Today survey. For many young voters like Banas, feeling disengaged or uninterested in politics is a major deterrent to civic engagement and voter registration.

Millennials' message: we drive less

By BECKY McKENDRY
Capital News Service
LANSING- The Millennial Generation is shying away from the driver’s seat, according to a new report. “Moving Off The Road,” published by the nonprofit Public Interest Research Group, suggests working from home, economic factors and urban population contributed to less driving nationwide. In 2013, Michigan drivers traveled almost 6.7 percent fewer miles than in 2005 and 7.6 percent fewer miles than in 2007, the peak driving year. Those in their late teens to early 30s strongly lead the trend. And as the trend is expected to continue, many Millennials are transporting themselves in different ways.