Controversy in Meridian Township due to CATA's proposed BRT system

By Riley James
The Meridian Times Staff Reporter

CATA plans on adding two designated bus lanes right down the center of the Grand River Avenue corridor for the Route 1 bus. The bus rapid transit (BRT) system is expected to improve certain aspects of Grand River Avenue including traffic congestion, safety, and attractiveness. “CATA is not changing the entire system to a BRT system. CATA is proposing to change Route 1 to a Bus Rapid Transit line to improve travel for all modes along the corridor,” said Debbie Alexander, the assistant executive director of CATA. “When buses operate in their own lanes and use stations for boarding, the speed of travel for the bus rider is improved by up to 13 minutes, and the flow of auto traffic is improved because buses are not stopping frequently to drop off and pick up passengers along the 8.5-mile corridor,” said Alexander..

Bus Rapid Transit could replace CATA's Route 1 bus

By Griffin Wasik
Ingham County Chronicle Staff Reporter

A $143 million proposed Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system could be finished as soon as 2018. The BRT would run from the Capitol to Meridian Mall via Michigan and Grand River avenues. It would also add a designated bus lane, remove current bus stops, and add traffic signals, according to Meridian Township documents. “The total cost of the BRT is not $133 million,” John R. Veenstra, a Trustee member on the Meridian Township Board of Commissioners, said. “Many people are getting this confused.

Bicycles growing in popularity, says Old Town bike shop owner

By Zachary Swiecicki
Old Town Lansing Times Staff Reporter

While traveling along Grand River Avenue in Old Town Lansing, you can see CATA buses, cars, trucks, bicycles, motorcycles, or pedestrians walking around. Chad Cottom, owner of SPIN Bicycle Shop, has seen the change in transportation in the eight years his store has been open.  Cottom is passionate about bikes and is committed to providing his bikes to the residents of Old Town. “I would say cycling has become a little more popular,” Cottom said.  “I would hope to say that we’ve helped a little bit to adding to that by having a bicycle shop in Old Town.”

Redi-Ride is ready for changes

By Erin Gray
The Meridian Times

Proposals for CATA’s Redi-Ride service could increase taxes for Meridian Township citizens. Former Meridian Township Treasurer Tom Klunzinger said when Redi-Ride was voted into effect in 2000, the board proposed for a .2-mill tax to provide the service on a trial basis. Redi-Ride is a curb-to-curb bus service for citizens to any destination within Meridian, according to Township Manager Frank Walsh. “We have had some concerns raised about the service,” said Walsh, “So we are holding a community meeting to listen and engage the community in what issues have arisen.” The meeting was held on Oct. 27 at the Meridian Township Hall.

No ride created equal: views on Lansing mass transit

By Haywood Liggett
Listen Up, Lansing staff reporter

Local citizens relying solely on public transportation are giving mixed reviews on public transportation in the city. Numerous people have taken the bus at least once. However, a vast amount of the populous have access to a vehicle of their own, or that of a family member, close friend, significant other etc. But there are a large number of Lansing citizens that rely exclusively on public transportation. CATA, Lansing’s only bus system, is one of typical ways those without vehicles get around.

Bus services face rising costs

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By JORDAN TRAVIS
Capital News Service
LANSING – The Ludington Mass Transportation Authority’s demand-response services will continue, despite rising costs but with stable state funding. The operation offers rides on request to residents of Ludington, Scottsville and parts of Amber and Pere Marquette townships. Riders pay a fare, with discounts for senior citizens and people with disabilities. Services won’t be affected because the authority had money set aside to cover funding shortfalls and other financial crises, Director Richard Collins said. The operation is “very, very fortunate” to have what is called a rainy day fund, Collins said.