Traverse City tall building proposal as statewide implications

By CAITLIN DeLUCA
LANSING — Traverse City voters are deciding how to regulate the height of city buildings, in a vote with statewide implications. The local decision is whether to require voters to approve the construction of any city buildings more than 60 feet tall. The proposal is supported by Save Our Downtown, a group  that says citizens should decide when such buildings are allowed. It is opposed by Stand Up TC, a group that says the proposal is illegal. Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette recently bolstered their argument, warning in a letter to Traverse City officials that the proposed amendment to the city charter conflicts with the Michigan Zoning Enabling Act.

Traverse City tall building proposal as statewide implications

By CAITLIN DeLUCA
LANSING — Traverse City voters are deciding how to regulate the height of city buildings, in a vote with statewide implications. The local decision is whether to require voters to approve the construction of any city buildings more than 60 feet tall. The proposal is supported by Save Our Downtown, a group  that says citizens should decide when such buildings are allowed. It is opposed by Stand Up TC, a group that says the proposal is illegal. Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette recently bolstered their argument, warning in a letter to Traverse City officials that the proposed amendment to the city charter conflicts with the Michigan Zoning Enabling Act.

Traverse City tall building proposal as statewide implications

By CAITLIN DeLUCA
LANSING — Traverse City voters are deciding how to regulate the height of city buildings, in a vote with statewide implications. The local decision is whether to require voters to approve the construction of any city buildings more than 60 feet tall. The proposal is supported by Save Our Downtown, a group  that says citizens should decide when such buildings are allowed. It is opposed by Stand Up TC, a group that says the proposal is illegal. Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette recently bolstered their argument, warning in a letter to Traverse City officials that the proposed amendment to the city charter conflicts with the Michigan Zoning Enabling Act.

Traverse City tall building proposal as statewide implications

By CAITLIN DeLUCA
LANSING — Traverse City voters are deciding how to regulate the height of city buildings, in a vote with statewide implications. The local decision is whether to require voters to approve the construction of any city buildings more than 60 feet tall. The proposal is supported by Save Our Downtown, a group  that says citizens should decide when such buildings are allowed. It is opposed by Stand Up TC, a group that says the proposal is illegal. Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette recently bolstered their argument, warning in a letter to Traverse City officials that the proposed amendment to the city charter conflicts with the Michigan Zoning Enabling Act.

Two sites in UP classified as Historic Places

By ERIC FREEDMAN
Capital News Service
LANSING — Two Upper Peninsula sites have been added to the National Register of Historic Places– one culturally important to members of the Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians and the other related to a strike important to labor and women’s history. Rice Bay in Gogebic County is a traditional wild rice-growing area covering a quarter-mile-square on northeastern Lac Vieux Desert, a lake straddling the Michigan-Wisconsin border. And the 128-year-old Braastad-Gossard Building in downtown Ishpeming served as a department store and a factory that manufactured women’s undergarments before being renovated for an interior mall and offices. “The National Register is the official list of the nation’s historic places worthy of preservation,” according to the National Park Service, which administers the program. Lac Vieux Desert is the headwaters of the Wisconsin River, and most Michigan wild rice sites are within 10 miles of the state border.

World Trade Center architect’s Detroit vision

By AMANDA PROSCIA
Capital News Service
LANSING — John Gallagher profiles Japanese-American architect Minoru Yamasaki in his new book Yamasaki in Detroit: A Search for Serenity. Best known for his design of the World Trade Center in New York, a number of Yamasaki’s designs adorn Detroit’s urban landscape, including the One Woodward Avenue building (formerly the Michigan Consolidated Gas building). The city was Yamasaki’s adopted home. He moved from New York to a Detroit suburb in his mid-30s and remained in the area until his death in 1986. “The great irony is Yamasaki is known as the architect of arguably the most gargantuan project in the U.S., but mostly all of his other projects were very modest,” Gallagher said.