Pink School restoration connects Mason to its past

Mason’s Pink School is located on Mason parkland at 707 W. Ash St. When you walk into The Pink School on Mason parkland on West Ash Street, you can immediately feel the history in the 720-square-foot one-room schoolhouse. An old piano sits next to an American flag in the corner. Wall cases display old documents such as attendance records and homework assignments from the late 1800s. The desks are a hodgepodge of different designs, yet they all sit three feet off the ground with the old-fashioned bench seat that connects to the desktop.

Spring has sprung at Mason Community Garden

The Mason community garden is one of Mason’s kindest acts for its community. Local residents can grow their own produce in designated plots they apply for. For previous years, residents would go to the Mason City Council, but starting March this year they’ll be going to a different board. 

Madison NorfleetThe Mason community garden that’s ready for its 2022 gardeners. The City Council voted unanimously March 21 to have a licensing agreement with Mason Community Services. Community services will now  maintain the garden. 

 Linda Hughson with community services said, “The garden is something we can help with.

Rock and Roll: Former teacher spreads joy throughout Mason

You see rocks practically everywhere you go: the beach, a playground, Mount Rushmore. But, have you ever seen a rock painted like a pickle or a sunset? 

The Facebook group, MasonRocks!, has more than  1,700 followers who share the adventures and discoveries of painted rocks all around Mason or some that have traveled across state lines. 

Andrea Cecil

Andrea Cecil

Lorri McCalla

Lorri McCalla
Few of many rocks that Cecil and McCalla have painted over the years. This shows a small impact that the Facebook group has on the community. Former teacher Andrea Cecil started the group seven years ago after she found a ladybug rock while traveling in Northern Michigan and the corresponding Facebook group to go with it. 

“I started it in Mason while I was still teaching. So, I put a bunch out and I had students at the school I was working at paint them.

A volunteer firehouse provides Mason safety and protection with a family touch

Chief Kerry Minshall at his desk at the City of Mason Fire Department

Mason Fire Chief Kerry Minshall has lived in Mason his entire life. He knows what the town has been through and what it needs from a fire department. A family atmosphere is what he has created at the City of Mason Fire Department, Mason’s local volunteer fire department located in the heart of downtown on West Ash Street. 

The department is made up of nearly 30 volunteer paid-on-call firefighters. These volunteers have full-time jobs and commitments but give back to a community they love. “If you take the oath to put the pager on your hip, you have a community to protect,” said Powless, 29, who has been volunteering at Mason for five years. 

Powless, who has lived in Mason her entire life, was impacted by some fires that took place in Mason when she was younger.

Men set up their table

Ashes to go: Mason church puts on drive-thru Ash Wednesday 

Gabriella LopezPastor Johnson and Vlasic carry out the supplies needed to serve their congregation. This includes ashes, hand sanitizer and packets with information about the Lenten season. Everyone has heard of a fast food drive-thru or coffee drive-thru, but All Saints Lutheran Church in Mason is bringing ashes to the drive-thru world. You even get a packet to take home! 

The second Ashes To Go event began last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic and the church’s limited in-person opportunities. 

All Saints Lutheran Church is active in the community, participating in Mason’s Down Home Days which brings companies and organizations to downtown Mason. Each vendor gets a booth; the church decided to advertise a CROP Hunger Walk. 

About 30 people from the churches around Mason (including All Saints Lutheran Church) participated in the walk that raised awareness to end world hunger. 

Gabriella LopezPastor Erick Johnson prepares to give blessings on Ash Wednesday at All Saints Lutheran Church in Mason.

Artist tries to get Mason to warm up to ice sculptures

With winter nearing an end, Mason residents want to see the return of an old idea: an ice sculpture festival. 

Scott MillerThe ice sculpture Scott Miller made for Halloween at Pi Kappa Alpha in 2019. Twelve to 15 years ago, Mason used to hold an ice sculpture festival. Some Mason residents said it was similar to the Lansing festival and even had the same ice sculptor, Scott Miller. 

Miller stopped the ice sculptures for Mason because businesses lost interest. However, Miller said, “If they are interested, so are we” 

Recently, Lyle Johnson made a Facebook post asking if the residents of Mason would enjoy an ice sculpture festival downtown. Johnson received 28 likes and 9 comments from  people showing their support for the idea.

Men set up their table

Ashes to go: Mason church puts on drive-thru Ash Wednesday 

Everyone has heard of a fast food drive-thru or coffee drive-thru, but All Saints Lutheran Church in Mason is bringing ashes to the drive-thru world. You even get a packet to take home! 

Gabriella LopezOesterle receives her ashes and blessing from pastor Johnson with her friend Barbra Wilhem. Gabriella LopezPastor Johnson and Vlasic carry out the supplies needed to serve their congregation. This includes ashes, hand sanitizer, and packets with information about the Lenten season. Gabriella LopezMember and Chairperson Pete Vlasic stands in his place of worship before the start of the Ashes To Go event.