Sleep problems widespread among college students

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Jake Allen

Journalism freshman Kate Buyers poses for a portrait inside the College of Communications Arts and Sciences. Buyers said “It shows students and people in the college age group are able to prioritize what’s important to them even if that means putting these things in front of their health,” regarding sleep and sleep problems.

Journalism freshman Kate Buyers poses for a portrait inside the College of Communications Arts and Sciences. Buyers said “It shows students and people in the college age group are able to prioritize what’s important to them even if that means putting these things in front of their health,” regarding sleep and sleep problems.

Jake Allen

Journalism freshman Kate Buyers poses for a portrait inside the College of Communications Arts and Sciences. Buyers said “It shows students and people in the college age group are able to prioritize what’s important to them even if that means putting these things in front of their health,” regarding sleep and sleep problems.

For journalism freshman Kate Buyers, getting a full-night’s rest is pretty uncommon. She said as a college student she has to balance a social life with homework, among other things.

Student sleep problems

Buyers said she was not surprised to learn that 46 percent of MSU students reported experiencing sleep difficulties, according to the State of Spartan Health 2016.

Prioritizing things like going out with friends or studying for an exam over sleep says a lot about the college culture, Buyers said.

“It shows students and people in the college age group are able to prioritize what’s important to them even if that means putting these things in front of their health,” Buyers said.

Dr. Helena Molero, an assistant professor in the division of pulmonary medicine at the University of Minnesota, studies sleep problems. Molero said she was also not surprised to learn the State of Spartan Health 2016 results.

Molero said the issue with sleep and college students spreads beyond MSU.

“They might be chronically sleep deprived because they have to wake up too early compared to the time they are able to fall asleep,” Molero said. “It’s a very, very common issue we see.”

Molero also said, although college students are busy and a lot of times taking on new responsibilities, sleep is something they need to be better at.

“Sleep is essential. It’s not an option,” Molero said. “We have some work to do in that area when it comes to college-age students.”

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